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1080p vs 1080i vs 720p

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by bikspk, Aug 5, 2007.

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  1. Aug 5, 2007 #1 of 23
    bikspk

    bikspk AllStar

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    Rather than rely on subjective opinions I decided to do some research on the internet (disinformation superhighway) and came up with this:

    http://www.tvtechnology.com/features/Tech-Corner/Hoffner_features.shtml

    At some point, lets say, increasing the number of pixels just doesn't make a difference since the human eye, given a fixed viewing distance, just can't distinguish between two points once the distance between them becomes small enough.

    My conclusion from the article was that, unless you are sitting really close to the TV (less than 3 times the height of the "tube") then the current 720p and 1080i are entirely sufficient.

    The biggest benefit to 1080p is being able to represent a computer screen on the television where the number of vertical pixels is greater than 720 but, realize, that most of the time, when you are staring at a computer screen, you are actually much closer than 3 picture heights and are actually concentrating on one portion of the screen rather than the whole picture.

    If you believe that you need 1080p to get a good picture and you sit 10 feet away from your 42 inch, 720p hdtv then I highly recommend that you go to Best Buy and pick up the most expensive HDMI cables you can buy since the sales people have seen the difference between the "monster" cables and the cheap ones.
     
  2. Aug 5, 2007 #2 of 23
    MIAMI1683

    MIAMI1683 New Member

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    I have two TV"S one with both and one that wtill only go 720P one is 46" and one 42" I really can't see much difference, and I was one of those stupid consumers and run monster brand cables HDMI to both. I want a new TV for my living room again but I will only buy one that goes 1080i I have see 1080p and its nice but not worth the $ to me.
     
  3. Aug 5, 2007 #3 of 23
    MrHorspwer

    MrHorspwer New Member

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    Personally, I think the whole 1080p vs. other debate is beginning to get tired. It basically amounts to a group of people who already own a 720p/1080i display whining that 1080p makes no difference.

    Honestly... who cares? Is it an inferiority complex thing? 1080p guys have more pixles so I must point out that my set looks just as good :nono2:

    Bottom line, it's a television. It's not an object that requires skill to operate and it's not a collectors item, nor is it a priceless piece of art. It has no value other than what you pay at the counter. Why do people constantly have to defend their purchases like it's worth something more than their neighbors?

    If you really feel this way, or you feel that soembody shouldn't buy a new TV because they sit to far away from their current one... you need to take your entertainment less seriously.
     
  4. Aug 5, 2007 #4 of 23
    davring

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    I bought my set long before I fully knew the differences in the resolutions. I bought it based on what I thought was a really good picture. My sister has my set's twin, but in 720p, I think it looks great. To me, I see a difference. Would I spend the extra money again, probably would. I guess I am a bit of a geek, but you are right, it is only a TV.
     
  5. Aug 5, 2007 #5 of 23
    chopperjc

    chopperjc Godfather

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    All depends on what you are using it for. Gaming, sports, computer not sure one "size" fits all regarding resolutions or tv.
     
  6. Aug 5, 2007 #6 of 23
    VeniceDre

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    Unlike LCD most Plasma displays aren't 1080x1920, the new 1080p ones by Panasonic are full rez, so yes, you are getting a better picture in that respect.
     
  7. Aug 5, 2007 #7 of 23
    JeffBowser

    JeffBowser blah blah blah

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    Frankly, there's so much emotion in this particular subject (resolution), I have quit arguing it. Hey, VOS - see this - I am managing to stay out of it :lol:
     
  8. Aug 5, 2007 #8 of 23
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    !rolling
    Yeah, we seem to have a poster or two that can really take the fun out of it. :)

    I hope everyone has a TV that they like to watch. :D
     
  9. Aug 5, 2007 #9 of 23
    bikspk

    bikspk AllStar

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    My point was not to defend my televisions endowment, it was to inform people about resolution.

    If you let the people at Best Buy guide your decisions with their information then maybe you should wait for 1440p, "Super HDMI" and platinum coated cable ends.
     
  10. VeniceDre

    VeniceDre Hall Of Fame

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    As someone who is in the business of selling and installing Displays and Home Theaters I can honestly tell you there are differences between display types, manufacturers and resolutions... You can have better overall picture quality with a lower resolution set than one with a higher resolution... I find a lot of 720p Plasma have an overall better PQ than LCD 1080p flat due to the tech differences (black levels, response time).
     
  11. mcbw

    mcbw Mentor

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    Jul 23, 2007
    VOS:
    I am considering buying another HDTV. If all other things are equal (picture quality, etc), is there any reason to buy a HDTV with 1080p versus 1080i? If I buy a TV that has 1080p, will it revert to another resolution such as 1080i or 720p as needed? From what I have read here, there is nothing being sent out now or in the near future on the satellite or OTA at 1080p. Is that correct?

    My current five year old rear projection TV has a beautiful picture, but has burn in lines due to the pillar box setting that I use mostly. Are any of the LCD, plasma, or rear projection types of TV less prone to burn in?
     
  12. VeniceDre

    VeniceDre Hall Of Fame

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    mcbw:

    If you are currently looking to upgrade I would consider a 1080p set over a 1080i set. There is no OTA or Satellite transmissions that are 1080p but the next generation dvd formats, Blu-Ray and HD-DVD can output 1080p and have a an amazing pic if encoded correctly. Game sysems such XBOX 360 & PS3 also go up to 1080p.

    When it comes to display types LCD Flat, LCD RP, and DLP RP do not have the image rentention/burn-in problems that Plasmas do.

    Plasmas are not as bad as they used to be with IR but if you prefer pillar box for non HD 4:3 pics be sure your contrast is not too high and you should have no problems.

    Personally I prefer the color and black levels of a Plasma flat screen over a LCD screen... I can usually also spot response time issues with LCD flats and RP when it comes to live sport events.

    For a long time I've held onto my CRT RPTVs as main displays but now I've never been happier than I am now with my full resolution 1080p Plasma from Panasonic. I might eventually change out the other sets with the same line.
     
  13. mcbw

    mcbw Mentor

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    Jul 23, 2007
    Thanks for your input. I realize that each person has his own preferences, and I like hearing other's views.

    The size of a rear projection TV is not a problem in my TV room's set up. I was disappointed to see the burn-in, and want to avoid that problem in the future if possible. I used pillar box because the distortions of the other choices bothered me when watching non-HD. Most of the things I will watch in the future will come from the new set of HD channels, and the need for pillar box will lessen greatly. Although my present picture is great, when I am watching HD my eyes go directly to those burned in lines even if they are quite faint.
     
  14. cygnusloop

    cygnusloop Hall Of Fame

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    Doesn't it stand to reason that as time goes on, that there will be fewer and fewer 720p/1080i options? When I bought my Sammy 1080p DLP, the 720p version was still available, but my understanding was that it was being phased out.

    That, plus the fact that the cost difference for the 1080p version was really quite minimal (about $300 at the time for a 56") While I understand that this may not really apply to the flat panels now, it seems indicative of where the manufacturers are headed.

    That said, there is certainly more to a good picture than just raw resolution (as Venice Dre said). There is no substitute for at least a minimum of calibration, as most all sets kinda suck out of the box. IMHO, you can get a long way with just the HDNET test patterns. The AVIA type calibration disks can get you almost all the way there. And if your really picky, professional ISF calibration is always an option.

    It can't be said enough, if it looks good enough to you, it's, well, good enough. Don't let anyone bully you into making changes or purchases that don't really look better to you just because they are more "technically accurate".

    I use two basic setups on my TV, one for nighttime/dark room viewing, which is probably pretty close to technically accurate. I have another custom setup for daytime/bright room viewing that would probably make a professional calibrators eyes bleed :D . But, it looks good to me.
     
  15. VeniceDre

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    Contrast levels on CRT RPTV are key to avoid burn-in. Most sets come from the factory at 100%. Lowering the level is key for your future purchase and will lengthen the set's life... I currently have 2 Toshiba HD CRT HDTVs that are over 2 years old... I use pillar box for SD content with black bars on the side instead of grey but I have no burn on either set because the contrast levels are set correctly.

    However on my new Plasma I have SD content set to stretch or crop because I'm so paranoid of uneven picture wear.
     
  16. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I had the same experience as you do. My RPTV [CRT based] started to show burn-in.
    The more I read about TVs and the more places I went to see them, the more confused I got.
    See my sig line for what I bought. It is so much better than the HD RPTV I had before, that I'm almost glad the old one failed.
     
  17. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I ran my contrast settings very low [old time CRT fan]. Mine didn't start to show the problem until 3.5 years. The service tech & Sony was surprised that it happened. What bothered me even more was Sony no longer has replacement parts for it. I doubt very much I will ever buy a CRT [based set] again.
    Plasmas do look nice, but once burned with burn-in, I'm very hesitant to buy something that works like a CRT anymore.
     
  18. machavez00

    machavez00 Hall Of Fame

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    Phoenix,...
    Samsung is still selling new 720P sets <50"
     
  19. VeniceDre

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    I had a 40 inch table top Sony CRT RPTV that got the fox news symbol burned in during the 9/11 coverage... There was no such thing as a commercial break during the first few days and as a transplanted NYer I laid in front the set... An ex-girlfriend eventually ended up with the set... I was careful with the 65 inch once I got it... I hope it doesn't burn in soon... :(
     
  20. cnmsales

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    I have a 52 inch LG Plasma and my folks have a brand new aquios LCD. The picture difference between mine and theres is staggering. There are variables there that im sure make a difference but Plasma for me is the best. Unless you own a PS3 or XBOX360 or plan on getting a BRDVD or HD-DVD player in the coming months I would go with a 1080i set. If you mainly use your set for watching TV it will be more than enough as TV providers dont and will not be broadcasting in this format for any time to come.
     
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