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1080P

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by 325xia, Jun 14, 2009.

  1. Aug 2, 2009 #101 of 146
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    :lol:
    Gee, this seems like it wasn't that long ago that "I was here".
    I wonder what's in common? ;)
     
  2. Aug 2, 2009 #102 of 146
    DeanS

    DeanS Legend

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    Thanks for the response regarding component cables carrying 1080p/24 content. My specific issue is the purchase of a new receiver with HDMI connections for my home theatre and an issue I ran into playing back 1080p/24 content from D*. Specifically, there is a lip synching error. I attribute this to the fact that I do not currently have a digital optical audio connection between the LCD TV and the new amplifier. I ran into the same problem with my old amplifier, and by making this connection, rectified it.

    Now, however, with the HDMI output from the HR-20 routed through the receiver, how do I correct this issue? The receiver (Yamaha RX-V65) needs to be on "HDMI2" input since that is the input used by the HR-20. There is an "AV1" input on the receiver that is potentially available (currently occupied by an older standard-def DVD player with component and optical digital output). Would simply removing this component and connecting the HR-20's component and optical audio output to "AV1" on the back of the new receiver fix this issue? I think somehow the optical audio output from the LCD TV to the receiver is what is really needed to address this issue, but I am at a loss on how to do this with this new receiver.
     
  3. Aug 3, 2009 #103 of 146
    dhkinil

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    Not sure this is the appropriate thread, but what content besides ppv or d* cinema is available through d* at 1080p. I am getting a new tv which supports 1080p 60, 30 and 24. I plan to have it hooked up to an h20 which does not support 1080p but can move some things around so that it would be available.

    Thanks, and if this is not the right thread, which is?
     
  4. Aug 3, 2009 #104 of 146
    LarryFlowers

    LarryFlowers New Member

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    There are no other sources... no broadcaster or cable channel uses 1080p/24 so at this time it is limited to movies. I wouldn't look for that to change anytime in the near future.
     
  5. Aug 3, 2009 #105 of 146
    dhkinil

    dhkinil Icon

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    I assume your response was aimed at me, so thanks,
     
  6. Aug 4, 2009 #106 of 146
    pinegein

    pinegein Cool Member

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    I am looking to get a new TV how would I know if it supports 1080/24. Thanks
     
  7. Aug 4, 2009 #107 of 146
    Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I think the listed specs and maybe a search here or google are about all there is.

    I can't think of anything else.

    FWIW, my TV supports 1080/24p (see link in my signature)

    Mike
     
  8. Aug 4, 2009 #108 of 146
    pinegein

    pinegein Cool Member

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    Thanks I looked though the specs but did not see any thing so I got this one Philips 47 47PFL5704D F7 120Hz 2MS 1080p LCD HDTV at 999 plus tax seems like a good deal. I still hope it supports 1080/24 though.
     
  9. Aug 4, 2009 #109 of 146
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    The 120Hz would suggest it does support 1080p/24.
    This is because 120 Hz is a multiple of both 60 Hz & 24 Hz, which is the key. 60 Hz gets "shown" twice and 24 Hz is five times.
     
  10. Aug 4, 2009 #110 of 146
    Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    To continue what VOS is saying, 240Hz, which is popular these days, is also a multiple of 24Hz & 60Hz.

    Even multiples is key...or get a plasma...let's see the backlash on that one. :rolleyes:

    Mike
     
  11. Aug 4, 2009 #111 of 146
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    W.Mdtrn Sea
    And new line slow coming - 480 Hz.
     
  12. Aug 4, 2009 #112 of 146
    ToBeFrank

    ToBeFrank Legend

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  13. Aug 4, 2009 #113 of 146
    mhammett

    mhammett AllStar

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    I don't get excited over TV refresh rates. The content is generated at 24 or 30 frames... 120 is pointless.
     
  14. Aug 4, 2009 #114 of 146
    cygnusloop

    cygnusloop Hall Of Fame

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    Except that 120 is smallest number evenly divisible by 24 and 30. Which makes 120 kind of a magic number. Now, the merits of 240Hz, 480Hz, etc... that may be another matter.
     
  15. Aug 4, 2009 #115 of 146
    mhammett

    mhammett AllStar

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    I guess I've just been used to monitors that can display different refresh rates natively. ;-)
     
  16. Aug 4, 2009 #116 of 146
    Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    IIRC, it's the whole reason for 120Hz. :scratchin

    Mike
     
  17. Aug 4, 2009 #117 of 146
    pinegein

    pinegein Cool Member

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    Thanks for all the answers and the research that was done.
     
  18. Aug 4, 2009 #118 of 146
    cygnusloop

    cygnusloop Hall Of Fame

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    Fair point.
    There are a few (mostly plasma/CRT) displays out there that have a variable refresh. For example the KUROs are capable of 60Hz or 72Hz, IIRC. I'm sure there are a few more.
     
  19. Aug 5, 2009 #119 of 146
    TomCat

    TomCat Broadcast Engineer

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    Mike, I am willing to bet that you are correct that this was the original reason, because it does indeed provide the benefit of the ability to remove judder from content that has 3:2 pulldown (which is what most movies and filmed content displays with).

    But I am also willing to bet with long odds that the reason for 240 or 480 is simply more marketing one-upsmanship, as it provides no benefit whatsoever.
     
  20. Aug 5, 2009 #120 of 146
    TomCat

    TomCat Broadcast Engineer

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    There is indeed 1080p24 content available live from DirecTV 24/7 on The NFL Network. As a matter of fact, that is their native format.

    The NFL Network allows TV stations to carry certain in-market games as broadcast events (we carried one last Thanksgiving, in fact) using NFL as the backhaul. One requirement was a crossconversion of their content to the native format of the station (from their native 1080p24 to our 720p60). All content must be broadcast at the same format to prevent reacquiring resolution at changes between broadcast media elements (which would glitch every TV every time we went to a commercial), and that required us to crossconvert them to match us for that broadcast.

    The network relies on a huge library of old NFL Films content, all shot in original film format at 24p. Rather than convert that to something more common such as 1080i30 or 720p60, they opted instead to crossconvert all other interstitial programming and commercials, which likely is produced at 1080i30 or 720p60, to 1080p24, for the same reason we had to crossconvert them to match us. So this channel also transmits no judder, even on filmed content.

    Also, you can pause their content on DTV and frame advance, and every frame is unique, meaning there is no pulldown. Note that you will see a frame repeat on occasion, and that is a transmission phenomena (a repeated frame replacing a corrupted frame) which is common. Your DVR may state "1080i resolution original format", and that is technically true, as 1080p24 does indeed have the same resolution as does 1080p24.

    Ironically, this means that TV's incapable of 1080p24 native, will actually add the pulldown back in, actually adding judder, as they need to pull it down to match the 60 fps native refresh rate of the display.

    This puts in question the wisdom of NFL doing this at a point where 95% of the TVs receiving them are incapable of reproducing their native format without adding pulldown and judder. Seeing as how crossconversion is not something done ahead of time to library content, and is instead a live transparent function using a single piece of equipment that simply sits there in the program stream and does the same thing all day long, they could have just as easily stayed with a conventional format until 1080p24-capable sets were commonplace, and then made the switch.
     

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