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3 tvs in one room. how to set up remote?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by bhigh8, Feb 6, 2013.

  1. bhigh8

    bhigh8 Legend

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    Oct 4, 2006
    remote will work for channels but volume and power will end up changing all the tvs.

    this does stink but i will figure out a way to manage it. Thanks Yoda for the info.
     
  2. DBSNewbie

    DBSNewbie Icon

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    Nov 3, 2007
    Whether you use one D* remote (set to different IR codes) or 3 remotes set to RF (or any combination thereof) you can easily get by the same TV brand issue by simply masking the Infrared Sensors of each TV.

    The masking tape blocks out (limits) the IR reception of the commands from the remote(s), allowing you to just point the remote to the TV (and only TV) you wish to control (input, volume, on/off, etc.)

    This is the simplest way to do it.

    If you want to get elaborate and fancy, an RF remote and base station with discrete addressable emitters, such as Crestron (expensive) or URC (much more affordable -but just as capable, reliable, flexible, and expandable- for what you are trying to accomplish) is what is needed.

    Harmony remotes (cheapest RF remote solution, in general) will not work in your particular situation, as they are limited in their capabilities. If I recall correctly, the Harmonies can only control up to four devices discretely. You have six. EDIT: You technically only have 3 devices (the TVs) that need to be controlled discretely. The Harmony remote should work, but there is little to no room for expansion

    Crestron and URC can control a practically unlimited number of devices to not only control a bunch of TVs and Sat receivers of the same brand, but AVRs, Disc Players, Media Servers, lights, projectors, thermostats, cameras, etc., as well.
     
  3. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    You can program a regular DirecTV (rf) remote to control up to three different devices, all via RF. You don't need a separate remote for each unit. So you can control the three DVRs via either IR, RF, or a mix of the two, using a single remote.
     
  4. bhigh8

    bhigh8 Legend

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    Oct 4, 2006
    sorry to bring this back up....but now have tvs hung and trying to figure this out. so wouldn't putting masking tape on the sensors prevent it from being about to be used at all for volume or power?
     
  5. DBSNewbie

    DBSNewbie Icon

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    Nov 3, 2007
    The masking tape does not completely block out the IR reception. It just simply reduces it. However, if you use something opaque, like black electrical tape, then it will prevent you from controlling the TV's volume or power.

    With the masking tape, you would have to basically "aim" precisely at the desired TV to be controlled, rather than pointing the remote in the general direction of said TV, as you would when controlling an unmasked regular TV setup.

    Before I installed a URC control system, this masking tape solution worked perfectly. If you cut the masking tape neatly, one won't even notice that there is any masking tape there at all.

    Hope this helps.
     
  6. bhigh8

    bhigh8 Legend

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    Oct 4, 2006
    if I dont put any tape on it, what will happen? the two tvs are a pretty decent distance apart. i have a 40 inch samsung, then 60 inch panasonic, then 40 inch samsung. with about a foot inbetween each tv. not sure but i may be able to point remote away from tv i dont want to control.

    also, would i want to do each receiver as RF or IR. and will it work if i put receiver behind the wall i am hanging tvs on.
     
  7. AMike

    AMike Godfather

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    Nov 21, 2005
    I have 3 televisions in my media room each connected to its own receiver. The DirecTV receivers are setup separately with IR. 2 of the televisions in my media room are Samsungs and the larger one is a Panasonic. All devices are controlled by my Harmony One.

    As for the sound issue, when I mapped out how this was going to work initially, I purchased an Onkyo receiver 3 years ago where I could connect digital audio from 2 of the 3 D* receivers (the main receiver is connected via HDMI to the Onkyo). I had surround sound already set up in the room.

    The volume from the 3 televisions is set to 0. On the Harmony One, I set it up to select which audio source I wish to hear.

    I have 9 separate devices set up on this Harmony. The two Samsungs share the same remote settings, but I don't always turn those on when I'm in that room.

    I've attached photos of my Harmony.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. DBSNewbie

    DBSNewbie Icon

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    Nov 3, 2007
    If you are going hide the receivers behind the wall, you would need to put the remote in RF Mode. Somewhere on this forum, there is a thread that explains how to control more than one receiver with one remote. I don't seem to recall how many can be controlled via RF from one remote, though. Plus, I'm not sure if it is possible to control more than one brand of TV from a single DirecTV remote - when controlling more than one DirecTV receiver from it.

    To make things super simple, you could use three separate remotes and label them something like LEFT, CENTER, RIGHT. Each one in RF Mode with the left and right programmed for a Samsung TV and the Center to a Panasonic. To me personally, it would be much quicker to pick up a separate, dedicated labeled remote, rather than pick up a standard DirecTV remote and have to "Slide" the thingy on top to the desired component.

    Ultimately, I would suggest you get some kind of Universal Remote control system. A single remote solution is always best, but the Standard DirecTV remote is just a bit clunky with the slider on top.

    As far as masking the IR eyes, the Panasonic obviously does not need any tape, but when you point the remote at the left TV and press VOL UP, for example, it may inadvertently raise the volume on the right TV (if they are not masked) even if the LEFT and RIGHT ones are on opposite sides of the room(Unless the are facing one another - Not parallel to one another).

    You could always test it out and see if there is enough separation between the two Samsungs. If I were to take a guess, I would say no. But, every configuration is unique and you may have different results with your equipment and setup.

    Good Luck.
     
  9. bhigh8

    bhigh8 Legend

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    Oct 4, 2006
    cool thanks. when i turn on the tv will the other also come on? not a big deal but just wondered. i would love a universal remote but to control 3 tvs and 3 receivers and possibly sound. in the past i just had 3 remotes. it wasnt too bad.

    is there a way to have the center tv come on and the sound bar come on at the same time while using a directv remote?
     
  10. eakes

    eakes Godfather

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    I have five TVs (each connected to fits own Directv receiver) in my living room, one 65 inch, and four 42 inch. All are different brands, ufortunately, even though different brands, one TV responds to codes for one of the other TVs. The solution was to operate the 'rogue' TV using RF commands. There is a IR to RF converter on the market (NextGeneration Remote Control Extender - google it) that uses an RF transmitter and a shortend AAA battery that will replace a AAA battery in the remote (package has a 'AA adapter' if the remote uses AA). There is an RF receiver with an RF to IR converter that goes at the TV. Put the battery/RF transmitter in the remote, tape over the IR emitter of the remote, place the receiver IR emitter adjacent to the IR pickup on the TV (make sure to tape over the emitter and pickup on the TV) and you are good to go.

    There should be no interaction between Panasonic and Samsung in your case, but the two Samsungs will interact. The IR/RF extender I describe above will allow the end user to use the TV remotes normally without knowning something 'special' is going on. The solution for Directv is easy, either use RF mode for each receiver or use different IR codes.
     
  11. DBSNewbie

    DBSNewbie Icon

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    Nov 3, 2007
    If the IR eyes are not masked, in all likelihood, both TVs on the left and right will turn on and off at the same time. Another thing to consider is that if the Samsungs do not have discrete on and off commands (only a POWER toggle command) then when one TV is on and the other is off, a press of the power button will turn the one that is off to on and vice versa.

    That could be a pain.

    I'm not sure that a single Directv remote will turn on both a tv and sound bar at the same time. I think you would have to program the sound bar to one of the AV modes on the remote and slide the thingy on top every time you wished to activate it. Again, that would be a bit clunky.

    A universal remote system is the way to go. You could program "Marcos" (URC term) or "Sequences" on to the remote to send out a set of commands to, for example, turn on a specific tv, put it on the correct input, turn on a specific directv receiver, turn on the sound bar, etc. with a single button press.

    Directv remotes are okay with a simple, one tv system, but I really suggest something else when you are talking about multiple TVs and receivers in the same room.

    As I had mentioned before, I have 6 TVs, 6 receivers, a cable box, a projector, plus CD , DVD, & BR players, and an AV Receiver all in the same room being controlled by a singe URC remote. One remote makes things so much easier.
     
  12. peds48

    peds48 Genius. DBSTalk Club

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    "Marcos" is the name of my cousin. "Macros" is the one you looking for.... !rolling
     
  13. DBSNewbie

    DBSNewbie Icon

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    Nov 3, 2007
    good catch!!! lol
     
  14. Edmund

    Edmund Remote Master

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    Southern Ca
    Yes, the Next Generation has newer system, called Genius. It has multiple frequencies, good in cases like this that have same IR codesets.

    http://www.amazon.com/Next-Generation-Products-greenGenius-Extender/dp/B004GBECI0/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1382122092&sr=1-1&keywords=next+generation+genius

    Each color is a different frequency, all you need is one basestation, it will come with one frequency, then buy separately a different color and so a different frequency battery gizmo.

    Then do what eakes wrote about masking the remotes, and the IR extender cable to the front of each tv, so that the only IR commands reaching the tv is over the IR cable. You won't be able to control more then one tv with directv remote anyways, so each Samsung will have its own directv remote with a different color gizmo device inside.
     
  15. bhigh8

    bhigh8 Legend

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    Oct 4, 2006
    jeez, this seems complicated. I don't mind using three remotes. its a pain but not horrible. would it be easier to buy a remote that does it all, if that even exists? and would it need to handle 7 devices? 3 tvs, 3receivers, and a sound bar? I have a feeling I will be hiring someone to come out to figure this out. not sure I understand the tape on the IR emitter on the remote part.
     
  16. DBSNewbie

    DBSNewbie Icon

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    Nov 3, 2007
    URC and Harmony make universal remotes with addressable RF Base Stations. That's what you would need to go with the single remote solution. Personally, I prefer the URC line. The programming takes a bit longer to learn, but it is a more sophisticated and robust system than the Harmony line, allowing you to control virtually an unlimited number of devices in any matter that you'd like. You can tweak them to your specific needs. (Your 7 devices would be a piece of cake - URC remotes have a 255 device limit, I believe)

    Keep in mind though that URC remotes are categorized as "Custom Installer" remotes and not targeted towards your typical Do It Yourselfer. They are intended to be programmed by an AV Pro Installer. However, if you purchase through an authorized dealer, they are able to pass along the programming software to you at their discretion.

    Once you have the programming software, it will take a bit of trial and error to figure things out. But once you do, you will never go back to a regular remote ever again.

    Good Luck
     
  17. eakes

    eakes Godfather

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    Sep 21, 2007
    Five DTV remotes and five TV remotes is not a problem. I keep mine setting side by side on an end table (TV remote paired with DTV remote). To further avoid confusion identify each pair with a unique number or symbol just in cas some user decides to shuffle the remotes.

    A piece of black tape covering the IR emitter of the Samsung remote with the RF adapter installed keeps that remote from controlling the 'other' Samsung TV. Similarily, placing the IR emitter coming from the RF receiver beside the IR input on the TV and then taping over both keeps the Samsung IR remote from affecting the Samsung set for RF control. Sounds a little complicated, but don't tape the IR emitters and the problem will become readily apparent.
     
  18. bhigh8

    bhigh8 Legend

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    Oct 4, 2006
    A piece of black tape covering the IR emitter of the Samsung remote with the RF adapter installed keeps that remote from controlling the 'other' Samsung TV. Similarily, placing the IR emitter coming from the RF receiver beside the IR input on the TV and then taping over both keeps the Samsung IR remote from affecting the Samsung set for RF control. Sounds a little complicated, but don't tape the IR emitters and the problem will become readily apparent.

    This is the part I have trouble with. Where is the it emitter and the rf adapter? I think the ir emitter is the thing on front of remote but what is the rf adapter?


    Sent from my iPhone using DBSTalk
     
  19. eakes

    eakes Godfather

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    Sep 21, 2007
    There are two parts to the NextGeneration system. First is the IR to RF converter (size of a AAA battery and replaces a AAA battery in the TV remote), second is an RF to IR converter (receiver) which is normally located near the TV set. The IR signals are converted to RF in the little transmitter placed in the remote's battery compartment. They are transmitted via RF to the RF receiver. Part of the RF to IR converter is an IR emitter (about the size of a pea) which connects via a wire to the RF receiver. If you look at the pictures of the NextGen equipment, the receiver is the device that looks like a flying saucer (of UFO fame). The IR emitter pod has sticky tape on it and can be stuck to the TV set adjacent to the IR sensor on the TV. The sensor and IR emitter need to shielded from the room (block with something solid or cover with tape) to prevent IR signals from the non-RF remote from operating the TV set or, depending on physical layout, signals from the IR emitter pod from being picked up by the other TV set.

    Every TV remote has an IR emitter builtin. This needs to be blocked on the remote you will be converting to RF operation. Easiest way to do this is with a piece of black electrical tape.
     
  20. joed32

    joed32 Hall Of Fame

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    Wow, I have 2 Sony's in the same room and just us a a Sony remote and hold my hand on the side of the remote with the TV that I don't want to change so I'm blocking the signal. Pretty simple.
     

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