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36-48 hours before I can use my new Plasma?

Discussion in 'High Definition Displays' started by DJSix, Nov 3, 2009.

  1. Nov 3, 2009 #1 of 28
    DJSix

    DJSix AllStar

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    Jan 19, 2004
    I was told by the Best Buy agent (helping me load my Panasonic TC-P50S1) tv into my vehicle that since we wouldn't be able to have the tv upright during transport, I'd have to wait 36-48 hours before powering the tv on. I couldn't find anythin about this in the owners manual or on Panasonic's website, anyone have any info on this?

    Ryan
     
  2. Nov 3, 2009 #2 of 28
    rudeney

    rudeney Hall Of Fame

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    :confused: Did you buy a plasma TV or a Frigidaire? :lol: I think this sales rep is seriously confused!
     
  3. Nov 4, 2009 #3 of 28
    Hutchinshouse

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    Another clueless sales rep. The screen is more susceptible to breakage during transportation. This is the only concern with placing a TV on its backside during delivery.

    Enjoy your new gear!
     
  4. Nov 4, 2009 #4 of 28
    CCarncross

    CCarncross Hall Of Fame

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    Maybe there was a misunderstanding, how cold did the tv get b4 you got it in the house? If it was out in the cold, it does need awhile to completely warm back up b4 it should be fired up.
     
  5. Nov 4, 2009 #5 of 28
    Lee L

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    Maybe a couple of hours if it was really cold outside. Surely, if you went straight home by the time you got the TV unpacked and mounted it should be ok, unless it was in a deep freeze all night.

    THe risk of breakage while laying flat is really the concern as was pointed out.
     
  6. Nov 4, 2009 #6 of 28
    bobukcat

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    Thanks for this one - I really needed a good belly laugh this morning!! :lol:

    I guess he thought you should let all the phosphors settle back to their normal positions before you fired it up!!
     
  7. Nov 4, 2009 #7 of 28
    RobertSeattle

    RobertSeattle Legend

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    He didn't tell you to use a hammer to check for "soft spots" in the plasma screen?
     
  8. Nov 4, 2009 #8 of 28
    DJSix

    DJSix AllStar

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    Jan 19, 2004
    Thanks for the the responses, I can always count on DBSTalk to set things straight :). The TV was only on it's side for no more than 20 minutes and the outside temperature was around 55 degrees. As soon I got home, it went straight inside. I ended up firing up the TV about 45 minutes after my post, and it looks GREAT. I just need to wait for HDNet to show the calibration screens and I'll tweak the settings.

    BTW, it wasn't a sales rep who told me wrong, it was one of the guys from the back where the tv's/etc are stored.

    Ryan
     
  9. Nov 4, 2009 #9 of 28
    jerry downing

    jerry downing Godfather

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    What he may have meant is for condensation to dissipate before firing it up. This should only be a problem in colder weather but he may have been a little overcautious.
     
  10. DJSix

    DJSix AllStar

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    I doubt it, since he didn't say anything about not firing it up if we had been able to have the box stand up straight.

    Ryan
     
  11. barryb

    barryb New Member

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    Aug 26, 2007
    Keeping a plasma screen upright keeps the thin glass that makes up the screen from delaminating (or completely breaking).

    Delaminating occurs as the bonding between the front glass layer and the picture-dot cell walls break, causing a blurring effect.

    Be sure to take a good long look at your new screen. They are -not- supposed to be laid flat.
     
  12. Grentz

    Grentz New Member

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    Jan 10, 2007
    For long periods or transport...dont worry the guy.

    Even most plasma manufactures recommend laying the plasma flat to put on/remove the stand.

    Its really not that big of a deal as long as you are not laying it down for long periods or transporting it that way.
     
  13. Lee L

    Lee L Hall Of Fame

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    I agree. My most recent purchase had the same directions to lay the set flat on the edge of a table for the stand install.

    IF you think of how glass trucks are built, they have racks that are just a touch out ot vertical to allow the glass to stand up, but still be supported on its entire surface because glass is more durable when standing up. The front of the TV is a piece of glass, so during transit, it is more suceptible to damage when laying down.
     
  14. rudeney

    rudeney Hall Of Fame

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    Yep, it's the same with ceramic and natural stone tile. You want to transport it on its edge to avoid breakage.
     
  15. drpjr

    drpjr Icon

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    Nov 23, 2007
    Sakatomatoes...
    Ah. A BB salesman strikes again. I had one tell me my TV would blow up if I didn't use a Monster HDMI cable.:eek2: Where do they get these guys??
     
  16. gameguru1360

    gameguru1360 New Member

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    Dec 6, 2009
    when I got my 42" panny plasma S1 tv last weekend, the BB salesman told me I'd have to wait 6 hours if it was to be transported lying flat. But I was able to transport it on the side with a 60/40 fold down seat, so it was only lying on its side for about 10 seconds.. Powered mine up after about 30 minutes or so...no problems here!
     
  17. Lee L

    Lee L Hall Of Fame

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    Like the rest of the thread said, he was full of crap. The danger in laying a TV flat is breaking the glass, which is greatly reduced form older sets. Once you are home, there should be no problems. In fact, by telling you the risk was somehow in not waiting, he was erroneously easing your mind to the true danger.

    Hopefully you did not beleive him when he told you to buy the $100 plus Monster cables also.
     
  18. DJSix

    DJSix AllStar

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    Jan 19, 2004
    Which is why I bought my plasma through BB's website, no way for the salesman to try to convince me that I need Monster cables.:D
     
  19. gilviv

    gilviv Godfather

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    Miami, FL. USA
    I helped FEDEX pull my new LG 42 LED backlight out of the truck, it was flat on its back! TV worked great for about 12 hours then it crapped out:mad: NO picture only sound. I guess it took a beating in shipping although no apparent damage to the set its guts must of been messed up. Got to watch 12 hours of the most incredible picture I have ever seen though, can't wait for the replacement to arrive.
     
  20. rudeney

    rudeney Hall Of Fame

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    Some people claim that laying a plasma screen flat can cause the glass panel to sag and "delaminate" from the cellular panel, allowing the gasses inside to escape and/or bleed between cells (i.e. pixels). I suppose there is some science behind that theory, but in practice, I've bought four plasma TV's (all 42" or larger) and all have been transported flat with no problems at all. I know that's just anecdotal data, but if this were such a common problem, I'd think we'd hear about it much more often. My opinion is that the biggest issue with transporting a plasma TV laying flat is breaking the glass.
     

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