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3DTV - Why The Hate?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Programming' started by Alan Gordon, Mar 29, 2010.

  1. gregjones

    gregjones Hall Of Fame

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    The first run of any new technology is generally under-supplied. This is by design to help inflate demand.

    There is a story of a restaurant in the early 60s in LA. When they opened, they told anyone that called that there were no reservations for the next 3 weeks. People that thought they had missed out on something filled the restaurant once it actually opened. This is the same sales pitch used for cars and other high-end items. DirecTV even tried it once on their service plan, calling it the Platinum Diamond-Encrusted Overpriced Celebrity plan if I recall.
     
  2. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Having been one of those who saw the 2009 and 2010 Consumer electronics Show 3D manufacturer presentations, demos, and onsite equipment reviews, it is pretty clear that almost every major HDTV maker is heavily investing in this new form or visual presentation.

    Will 3D HDTV be right for everyone? - no.

    Will 3D HDTV be adopted rapidly? - likely no.

    Will 3D HDTV grow in the amount of content available over time? - yes.

    Will 3D HDTV grow in market acceptance? - probably.

    It is indeed impressive technology and the visual experience is unlike any other. That doesn't mean I'm going to rush out and buy a new $2500 3D HDTV tomorrow, but I'm sure I'll be on the early side of adopters over the next year or so.

    As for those who have a strong anti-3D persuasion for some reason or another, I simply don't understand why one would - it is a take-it or leave it proposition. It's not being force-fed to anyone.

    Keeping in mind there are still plenty of folks who do not even own or view HDTV these days, despite it being out in the marketplace for many years, 3D HDTV will likely follow a similar path.
     
  3. Paul Secic

    Paul Secic Hall Of Fame

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    The first generation of any product always have flaws in them.
     
  4. Hutchinshouse

    Hutchinshouse Hall Of Fame

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    In a rush to force this technology, something will tank. My whole concern, this is a 1080/24P fiasco all over again. How many people stated their TV is 1080P, yet it doesn’t support 1080/24P. This is bound to happen again. Today’s 3D TVs will be noncompliant in 12 months.

    That said, I still have a good 5 years on my TV (Sony 52XBR4). Will my next TV support 3D? Sure, if the technology is still around.
     
  5. tonyd79

    tonyd79 Hall Of Fame

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    It is worse. It is more the Blu Ray/HD-DVD format wars again. Except, if rumor is to be believed, even the early adopters will have to change with 3D even if they do not make the decision to change themselves. Competing formats that will themselves change over time.

    How about settling on something, huh?
     
  6. Alan Gordon

    Alan Gordon Chancellor

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    I've never watched a 3D movie in the theater, but I enjoyed watching "Coraline" on Blu-ray last year. It didn't add to the story, but the dimension added to the film immersed me in the film more than I would have been had I not watched it in 3D.

    I'm not sure what difference there will be in pricing for the upcoming Blu-ray 3D movies, but I doubt it will be much. As far as sets go, I doubt many people will be going out to purchase 3DTVs to replace their currently fine TVs and Blu-ray players, so I don't really see it that way.

    I'd rather watch it on TV too...

    I would prefer DirecTV have given my DMA locals instead of giving them to Houston, Texas (DMA picked randomly, BTW), but I can understand why they offered them instead of mine.

    I also extremely doubt that D12 will bring me all the channels I want. In fact, I'm sure the majority of them will probably be for channels I have no interest in. HOWEVER, I think it's a smart idea for DirecTV to be pushing 3D. When someone goes to Best Buy and purchases a 3DTV, Best Buy can then try and push a DirecTV system on them due to them having 3D content.

    ~Alan
     
  7. Lee L

    Lee L Hall Of Fame

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    Until they put out some numbers, that is a totally meaningless PR. Best Buy is saying In store only for the VT20 Panny 3D, so it may well be out of stock but they have online purchase available for the Samsungs right now. Panasonic likely had just a few sets available early on. If there was such a huge demand, wouldn;t the Samsungs also be all sold out?

    AS far as helping Avatar break records, I am sure it did as the tickets were 30% more expensive for 3D showings. Sure, some people were swayed by 3D and went to see it if they were on the fence, but it was desitined to be a huge blockbuster already. Look at how many saw Avatar in 2D when in practically every city there were multiple 3D screens also.
     
  8. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    I respectfully disagree.

    Nothing is rushed.

    Nothing will "tank".

    Nothing is forced.

    In fact, this is one of those rare occasions where there are actually standards in place before the technology becomes even slightly mainstream.

    For example, 3D Blu Rays have a standard. 3D HDTV has a standard for 1080p and HDMI (v1.4 for the direct/full presentation version).

    I just don't understand all the anti-3D hype. If someone doesn't want to get that technology, simply don't do it.
     
  9. Alan Gordon

    Alan Gordon Chancellor

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    I do agree with you on this, but regarding this topic, check out this link:

    First Look: Panasonic's 3D Blu-ray Player and 3D HDTV

    Read the FIRST reply made by that1guypictures.

    :)

    ~Alan
     
  10. Hutchinshouse

    Hutchinshouse Hall Of Fame

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    I couldn’t agree more. I respectfully disagree with you respectfully disagreeing. :lol:

    No worries. I guess time will tell.
     
  11. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    !rolling

    Now I forgot who was agreeing with what disagreement. :lol:
     
  12. Hoosier205

    Hoosier205 Active Member

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    I disagree with the agreements to disagree, but disagree to agree nonetheless. Agreed?
     
  13. susanandmark

    susanandmark Godfather

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    I read and listen to a lot of AV and tech journalism and what I've heard from the vast majority of experts in the field, all of whom are way smarter and more tuned in than I, is that 3D TV is hype and they can't really see the widespread appeal either. No one was saying that about HDTV, even in it's earliest incarnations.

    Lack of content? Yes, that was a complaint with HD too, but no one wasn't blown away and thought it was the wave future. Most of the people I've heard talking view 3D as a flash in the pan.

    Of course everything all of us are saying here, and from the experts too, is pure speculation at this point. It could be bigger than sliced bread and we could all be wearing 3D-capable contacts 24-7 ten years from now and wondering how we lived without it ... But this is like DirecTV committing to show HD channels in 1993, the year the first HDTV's debuted and no one had one and nothing was being broadcast. DirecTV didn't have HDTV until it was, if not mainstream, at least widely available, tested and undeniably out there.

    At this moment, (new format) 3D content for TV viewing is vaporware, in terms of commercially available options for consumers, and the number of people who could view that content when it does appear number in the 1,000s, at best. That's why people think DirecTV's bandwagon jumping is bogus ... Of course, I'd just about guarantee that, in addition to the feature-list-checkbox factor adding one (or four) 3D channels accomplishes, DirecTV has deals ($$$) to carry this content that no one else is ready to offer and manufacturers want out there to make people think they're missing out and need a new TV, new equipment, et al.

    And the argument that there's a "standard" for 3D TV is laughable. Every manufacturer is doing their own thing, their own way and all are arguing their implementation is the best.

    Will I ever own a 3D TV? Maybe. If it's a great TV that HAPPENS to include 3D. And that's from someone, by the way, that has one of those light-controlled, decked out dedicated home theaters that we probably only visit once a week, at most ... once a month more realistically.

    We've got a kids, work and lives and finding the time to sit down and watch a movie--even one we really want to see; even in our home--has been much harder than we thought before we built the theater. Of course, that was also before we had a baby. I think there are more people like that in the world than those with lots of time, money and the inclination and all it entails to watch 3D at home. I'm not wishing the format ill, I just don't see a scenario in which it becomes viable in the mainstream.
     
  14. Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

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    Well, old friend, you and I will have to agree to disagree on some points. I do think 3D TV will "tank" at least in its current incarnation. I think it still carries some pretty serious limitations (viewing angles, the many issues with glasses) and that will limit market adoption.

    At some point there will be a glasses-free solution with a viewing angle as wide as current TVs and that may or may not achieve wide adoption.

    I've done my best to give 3D TV a fair shake, although honestly most of the manufacturers seem content to build glasses that just don't fit over mine.

    Of course, if I really wanted the technology to tank, I'd buy into it heavily. Given my track record, that would do it. :D
     
  15. Alan Gordon

    Alan Gordon Chancellor

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    I don't think 3D will be a raging success. I think it will continue to be a niche feature of TVs, and I suspect that studios will continue to provide Blu-ray content, and DirecTV will continue to provide limited channels to 3D.

    I think you mean 1998, and DirecTV offered HD channels at the start.

    There is a standard for Blu-ray 3D, but I am not aware of a standard for TVs though...

    Watching 3D content on a TV does not cost any more time than watching TV on a 2D HDTV. In a few years, there probably won't be any premium (as far as money goes). You are most likely correct on the inclination though...

    ~Alan
     
  16. susanandmark

    susanandmark Godfather

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    Sony debuted its first HDTV in 1993 and offered it for sale in the U.S. "that same year," according to their own press.

    I'm not trying to talk you into or out of anything you think about 3D TV. If you're excited, that's great. I've been wrong about lots of things ... I could definitely be wrong about this.

    I will disagree about 3D TV not taking more time than watching regular TV. You have to be sitting still, focused and listening--with those dreaded glasses on--to watch 3D TV. Regular TV can be on the background while you're doing just about anything, with no pre-planning required.
     
  17. spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone DBSTalk Club

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    I read and listen to a lot of the experts as well and have heard just the opposite - that 3D is here to stay and that it will succeed.

    The only times I've heard that it's hype and won't have widespread appeal is on forums like this one.
     
  18. gregjones

    gregjones Hall Of Fame

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    Again, I am not anti-3D. I just believe that 3D in its current incarnations takes away a lot of the improvements we have seen recently. Think of the strides made for wider viewing angles by better display technology. Many purchased a new HDTV just for this one feature of better (LCD) displays.

    It is going to be a hard sell to convince people that the things that mattered so much a year ago is not as important now. I have yet to see a 3D implementation where viewing angle was not a factor. This is just one hurdle.

    I want 3D as an option. I love technology. It pays my bills. But the standards to which people refer are in signaling, not in display. Having to replace the 3D Blu-Ray (standardized) player is much less of a concern than having to replace the (no standard is available) 3D TV that cost 2500-3000. When the dust settles, I feel we will all be happy to have a new option that is rational. But until then, any money spent on 3D displays or glasses is just as likely wasted as well-spent.
     
  19. gregjones

    gregjones Hall Of Fame

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    I feel it will succeed. I just don't think it will involve most of the display (TV) implementations offered today. The short-term joy of having an early 3D set will likely be lost when it is soon relegated as not being compliant with an as-yet unavailable display standard. (Keep in mind I am not denigrating an HDMI or Blu-Ray standard.)
     
  20. spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone DBSTalk Club

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    When watching 3D at CES, there was a line of displays. I was watching one that I was standing right in front of. However, when I looked down the line, there were other displays that I could barely see the front of the display because the angle was so great. However, with the 3D glasses on, I could see things coming right out of that distant, off-angle screen.

    I don't know how the final implementation will work, but in that case, the viewing angle was much better than with regular viewing. With the glasses off, I could see basically nothing on the screen. With them on, I could see things jumping out of it. It was amazing.
     

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