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Advice on upgrading

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by DS0816, Feb 3, 2006.

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  1. Feb 3, 2006 #1 of 16
    DS0816

    DS0816 Guest

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    Hi,

    I'm getting an upgrade from a Single LNB -- installed in March 1998 on one TV -- to a five-TV setup with HD programming on one TV and four single receivers on the remaining four TVs in the house.

    This is to take place on Tuesday of next week.

    My question in seeking advice: Would it be worth it to call DirecTV to arrange DVR service? I'm not familiar with any complexities in setting up other than concern for phone line, phone jack, and the specifics of such installation.

    I hope for feedback. I value any that is forthcoming.

    Thank you.
     
  2. Feb 3, 2006 #2 of 16
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    Yes....

    The complexity involved is to fully utlize the DVRs in the future, you want TWO lines run to each location... not just one.

    It would be much easier to do it know, if you get them to do it for free, or a marginal increase of cost.
     
  3. Feb 3, 2006 #3 of 16
    DS0816

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    Let's say I do it with two TVs. I live with my dad and he does no recording. I figure I should have DVR on one regular TV and the other DVR on the HD. So, I need two lines on each, right? Can it be done with a splitter? Do I need to go out and buy anything prior to the arrival of the DirecTV installer? (If so, I figure I should buy at Best Buy -- and I'm wondering if I can do so at Lowe's too. Sorry I'm ramblin'. I'm excited.)

    Thanks, ebonovic.
     
  4. Feb 3, 2006 #4 of 16
    pudge44

    pudge44 New Member

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    The standard installation includes a 5x8 multiswitch, which would allow for up to four dual-tuner DVRs to be installed.

    You must use a multiswitch, not splitters.

    To do what you described, you need seven lines (2 each to the two DVRs = 4) plus 3 more for the regular receivers. Shouldn't be a problem for the installers.
     
  5. Feb 3, 2006 #5 of 16
    Wolffpack

    Wolffpack Banned User

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    You and your Dad may not do any recording. I didn't before my first DVR. Once you get one you'll never watch live TV again. You do not realize what a DVR can do until you get one.

    As recommended above, run 2 lines to as many rooms as you can, just in case you do become a DVR house.
     
  6. Feb 3, 2006 #6 of 16
    SCDishMan2006

    SCDishMan2006 AllStar

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    I have to second that. I could never go back to anything other than a dual-tuner DVR. In fact, if they made one with four tuners, I would buy that and pull two more cables. To me, a single-tuner DVR is nothing more than a glorified $39 VCR.

    If I were the original poster, I would be sure two RG6's were pulled to every room that had a TV in it and hooked up to the multiswitch. As a trick, what I did was tape the two runs of RG6 to the cable company cable and pull it through that way, using the existing line as a pull tape.
     
  7. Feb 8, 2006 #7 of 16
    DS0816

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    Hello,

    Everything was just installed on Tuesday [Feb. 7]. The complete upgrade. A multi-satellite dish that has up to eight switches on it. I have five rooms with DirecTV, one of which is HDTV. I did not get the DVR because Detroit locals on HDTV cannot be DVRed just yet -- a new receiver box and likewise dish will make it possible (in coming months).

    I needed to upgrade now; it was either stick with DirecTV or go back to cable. Cable was actually more money by comparison to DirecTV. And despite Detroit being number-11 in DMAs (overtaken in recent times in the number-10 spot by Houston), we put up with poor locals picture quality from cable too much in the way of ingress and distorted picture quality (WJBK - Fox 2; WDIV - NBC 4; WXYZ - ABC 7). (Note: Wide Open West here is better than Comcast in this respect. I'm continuing with WOW! Internet and Cable for high-speed Internet.)

    So far, my dad loves it. He is just going to be having to get used to navigating the channel system. I edited out the pay-per-view channels -- a likely waste -- in the living room, so that he can up and down those channel keys and see program content a lot quicker. (For a buffer, I included the Mix channels, in the 100s, and a couple DirecTV-related Info channels, like, on channel 201, Direct Basics. I'll later figure out which XM channels to keep on board -- about five or six, I'm presuming.)

    As a result of all this, there is just one problem: ABC affiliate in HD has had a snafu. I don't quite know how to describe it (though there has been delay for more than a couple minutes in Searching for Satellite Signal), I'm thinking Detroit locals in HD are so new to DirecTV (how long ago did it make HD available in Detroit locals -- anyone?), it'll take a little time in perfecting the transmission of programming.

    P.S. I haven't had much time to check out HD programming (because of timing!) -- but from what I looked, I saw how vivid and two-dimensional it is. Watching Discovery HD is especially a treat -- I feel like I am there (wherever they are -- in traveling and showing different cultures) and it is awesome!
     
  8. Feb 8, 2006 #8 of 16
    Bobman

    Bobman Hall Of Fame

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    If your that happy with DirecTV's HD you should check out 1081 HD thru other providers. You would really be happy.
     
  9. DS0816

    DS0816 Guest

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    Sorry, Bobman -- I don't understand what you've written.
     
  10. Bobman

    Bobman Hall Of Fame

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    I dont have HD thru DirecTV but from my understand by reading other forums DirecTV does not offer the highest quality HD 1080 signal, it is the lower 720 one. If you get cable they have the 1080 and the difference is very noticible.
     
  11. Texlonghorn

    Texlonghorn Cool Member

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    Feb 10, 2006
    were did you get that info from
     
  12. Texlonghorn

    Texlonghorn Cool Member

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    Feb 10, 2006
    the h20 has 1080
     
  13. Wolffpack

    Wolffpack Banned User

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    As does the HR10-250
     
  14. CCarncross

    CCarncross Hall Of Fame

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    Jackson
    I think what he was trying to say was that currently most if not all of D*'s HD content is not shown in full 1920x1080 output, most of it only at best 1280x720, and commonly referred to as HD-Lite by the D* bashers.....and truthfully it can look pretty poor when compared to a decent bitrate 1080i signal....like from a local OTA
     
  15. Bobman

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    The info was from the tivocommunity forum in the HD section. Its not what the units can receive, its what DirecTV is sending. Its not real 1080 like cable and OTA has, its a much lower quality. Many were very disapointed with it when compared to a real 1080 signal from what I remember reading.

    I am not up on all the technical wording so the guy above me might have stated it in the correct terms.
     
  16. Igor

    Igor Godfather

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    :nono2:

    DIRECTV transmits HD in two formats: 1080i and 720p. The format choice is made by the content provider. You do not seem to realize that even when receiving OTA, some HD channels are transmitted in 720p.

    DIRECTV receivers (at least H10, H20 and HR10) have the capability to convert between the two formats. I believe this is to give the user the ability to choose the output format (but could also be because certain televisions do not support both formats).
     
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