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Afghan Clerics Demand Convert Be Killed

Discussion in 'The OT' started by tomcrown1, Mar 23, 2006.

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  1. tomcrown1

    tomcrown1 Hall Of Fame

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    Jan 16, 2006
    http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2006/03/23/international/i121727S21.DTL

    Senior Muslim clerics demanded Thursday that an Afghan man on trial for converting from Islam to Christianity be executed, warning that if the government caves in to Western pressure and frees him, they will incite people to "pull him into pieces."


    In an unusual move, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice telephoned President Hamid Karzai on Thursday seeking a "favorable resolution" of the case of Abdul Rahman. The 41-year-old former medical aid worker faces the death penalty under Afghanistan's Islamic laws for becoming a Christian
     
  2. bobsupra

    bobsupra Work In Progress DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Jul 12, 2002
    Now, let me see if I understand this. In another country, rightly or wrongly, a trial is underway. No verdict, as yet...much less a punishment. And the SecState believes it appropriate to call the head of state to offer advice.

    I wonder how Bush would feel is the French Foreign Minister called and offered advice about an on-going trial in the US. Most likely the call would not be accepted.

    I don't know much about the issue, but to make a personal plea at this stage sounds to me like we're treating Afganistan as an American colony where we can dictate their internal affairs. That being said, if the poor dude is found guilty, and any punishment is given out, then we should voice an opinion and do what is necessary to ensure justice is done. But let's wait until the jury/judge/iman has spoken.
     
  3. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

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    The problem is that there is a "trial" in the first place.
     
  4. bobsupra

    bobsupra Work In Progress DBSTalk Gold Club

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    True, Richard, but countries have their own way of doing things. Our system of Justice is unique to ourselves, with most everyone entitled to a trial by their peers. In some counties, there is no trial...just a rope. France operates that one is guilty up front and has to prove otherwise. And every country has their unique set of laws.

    As a side note, the US (especially those on the right and on the SCOTUS) believe that international legal opinions and/or sense of justice does not belong in our courts and has no bearing or precedent whatsoever. And, as we've found out lately, one's day in court is limited if you're in jail at Gitmo.

    As I was taught early by Playboy magazine...I don't like double standards.
     
  5. jonstad

    jonstad Hall Of Fame

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    Jun 27, 2002
    Quite right Richard. But this is the "freedom and democracy" we have liberated the oppressed Afgans to, apparently predicated on WWTD.(What Would the Taliban Do?):nono2:
     
  6. AllieVi

    AllieVi Hall Of Fame

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    Their system of justice says that what he apparently did is a crime and punishable by death. Seems a bit harsh to me, but if he knowingly "did the crime" he may have to "do the time."
     
  7. GeorgeLV

    GeorgeLV Godfather

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    bobsupra, I'll take you up on your moral equivalence argument when we start issuing the death penalty for apostaty. Our government has every right to speak out against gross human rights violations.
     
  8. Bogy

    Bogy Hall Of Fame

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    Mar 23, 2002
    Glad you feel that way. That is what other nations feel when we execute children.
     
  9. Fifty Caliber

    Fifty Caliber Banned User

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    Jan 4, 2006
    IIRC, several years ago the UN Commision on Human Rights wanted to draft a resolution stating that any action by an individual, group of individuals, or organization to atempt to persuade another person to change their religious beliefs would be considered a human rights violation.
     
  10. jonstad

    jonstad Hall Of Fame

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    Jun 27, 2002
    "wanted to draft"?

    What does that mean?

    There's some pretty idiotic ideas brought up in Congress, state legislatures and city and county councils. Some are even passed into law. In that context, "wanted to draft" is meaningless!
     
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