1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Another 1080p/1080i/720p discussion, pulled from D11 thread

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by morgantown, Jun 13, 2008.

  1. Aug 11, 2012 #81 of 111
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    42,679
    348
    Dec 9, 2006
    Doesn't really make sense.
    If you limit a 1080 panel to 720, you're still going to need to scale the image to fill the screen.
    Everything is really geared to the manufacturing costs of the panel, so if it's cheap enough, there isn't any reason to limit it.
     
  2. Aug 11, 2012 #82 of 111
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

    21,613
    143
    Jul 25, 2002
    W.Mdtrn Sea
    Easy.

    But if you still use 1920x1080 panel (BTW, panels has the parameter as VxH) you'll see the picture's pixels [1280x720] as a rectangle (usually centered).
     
  3. Aug 11, 2012 #83 of 111
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

    15,240
    552
    Dec 2, 2010
    Winters,...
    Yes, of course it'd scale to 720.

    The reason for so doing is marketing. It's been done in other industries, computer and camera are what I am thinking of: If you can maximize profits by selling 4,000,000 720 sets @ $300 and 6,000,000 1080 sets @ $400 whereas if you had only a 1080 model, but that would sell only 7,000,000 sets @400, you're better off with offering a cheaper alternative. And if that cheaper alternative can be manufactured at a lower cost by using the same innards but crippling it a bit, you'd do this.
     
  4. Aug 11, 2012 #84 of 111
    banditt76

    banditt76 Godfather

    266
    0
    Jul 17, 2012
    That would be awesome to get a 1080p TV through a firmware update, but I honestly don't think it's happening. I would never buy a 720p TV regardless. The first thing I look at when I see a great price is whether the TV is 720p or 1080p. It's really not worth it anymore. 1080p can usually be had for like $50-$100 more depending on the size.
     
  5. Aug 11, 2012 #85 of 111
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

    15,240
    552
    Dec 2, 2010
    Winters,...
    No disagreement; I wouldn't either. But a lot of folks would, to save the bucks. Again, under 32" it's barely noticeable. A portion of those good folks might also tune SD channels and still think they're in HD land.
     
  6. Aug 11, 2012 #86 of 111
    banditt76

    banditt76 Godfather

    266
    0
    Jul 17, 2012
    I actually bought my HDTV online at ShopNBC. They let your break down payments of six months no interest. Got a much better TV than I would have been able to get otherwise.
     
  7. Aug 11, 2012 #87 of 111
    bobnielsen

    bobnielsen Éminence grise

    8,473
    92
    Jun 29, 2006
    Bainbridge...
    Except for DirecTV's technical enhancements to make it easier to tell the difference between HD and SD channels. :lol:
     
  8. Aug 11, 2012 #88 of 111
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

    15,240
    552
    Dec 2, 2010
    Winters,...
    Heh.... Still, some won't get it! Better a big flashing text warning!
     
  9. Aug 11, 2012 #89 of 111
    mechman

    mechman Legend

    113
    0
    Apr 29, 2006
    Diagonal image and viewing distance should both be factored in. May be worth pointing out the excellent article on Carlton Bale's site as well as his chart:

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Aug 11, 2012 #90 of 111
    tonyd79

    tonyd79 Hall Of Fame

    12,971
    204
    Jul 24, 2006
    Columbia, MD
    Except you can do the same thing and just have two lines with two different screens. The rest can be the same and firmware can adjust which screen it is talking to. Since the single largest cost is the screen (by far), you save even more by using a 720p screen for the 720p set. The rest, spare firmware for the screen driver, would be the same. The single line cost savings would not overcome the price of a 1080p screen on a pet unit basis. And if all the rest is the same, you can control your lines based on sales pretty tightly.
     
  11. Aug 12, 2012 #91 of 111
    Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

    4,567
    0
    Sep 3, 2004
    Great article and chart. I plugged my 50" screen in the utility at the bottom of the page and I'm just on the edge of benefiting from 1080p. That fits my experience.

    Thanks for the post, mechman! :) :righton:
     
  12. Aug 12, 2012 #92 of 111
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

    15,240
    552
    Dec 2, 2010
    Winters,...
    If you assume there's a big differential between the two costs, then my hypothetical doesn't start at all!
     
  13. Aug 12, 2012 #93 of 111
    Shades228

    Shades228 DaBears

    6,081
    45
    Mar 18, 2008
    Currently Samsung Plasma's use the same boards for a majority of their TV models. This means that you can unlock functions only allowed in higher models if you know what you're doing, you can also do a lot of damage if you don't, so it wouldn't be unheard of for companies to use 1 board and sell a 720/1080 set. However I don't think they will. Manufacturers want to limit settings not really resolution. If someone can offer a 1080 tv for the same price as a 720 version of their competitor they will because the average employee in Walmart, best buy, or other big box store will sell the numbers that marketing feeds them instead of what is actually better about the TV.

    If people really knew how to spec out electronics the market would shift significantly. Instead of dynamic contrast ratios there would be calibration level settings on the signs.
     
  14. Aug 12, 2012 #94 of 111
    fleckrj

    fleckrj Icon

    1,566
    144
    Sep 4, 2009
    Cary, NC
    No one disputes that, at a close enough distance (which is determined by the size of the screen), 1080p is better than 720p. What is missing from the chart is the point that is most disputed - at what point, if any, is there a difference between 720p and 1080i.
     
  15. Aug 12, 2012 #95 of 111
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    42,679
    348
    Dec 9, 2006
    Each viewer's point [distance] may vary.
    There is something I've wanted to add that may help:
    When I first used a PC HD tuner card and watched it on my 19" [1600x1200] monitor, it showed a picture quality that was much different than TVs.
    I think it simply comes down to dot pitch [or pixel dimensions], where when they're so close/tight, the eye can't distinguish them and sees something that looks like film.
    When I went looking for my next TV, I saw the same quality on a fairly small panel, but not on the larger ones being displayed.
    My 1080p 46" does come very close [and why I picked it].
    The chart posted does suggest similar sizes & distances.
    I also have a 720 32", but I don't care how far I'm back from it, it doesn't look as good as my 1080p.
     
  16. Aug 12, 2012 #96 of 111
    mechman

    mechman Legend

    113
    0
    Apr 29, 2006
    The dispute is ridiculous and I was replying to someone directly discussing matters similar to my post:

    The differences between 1080i and 720p have been discussed here ad nauseum. Resolution is resolution. I've seen 720p that is better than 1080i and vice versa on my 100" screen. It rarely has anything to do with resolution.
     
  17. Aug 12, 2012 #97 of 111
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    42,679
    348
    Dec 9, 2006
    I've really only seen one this size, but what struck me the most were the lines/dot sizes were HUGH, which is the opposite "quality" I was describing in the post before this.
     
  18. Aug 12, 2012 #98 of 111
    machavez00

    machavez00 Hall Of Fame

    3,727
    7
    Nov 2, 2006
    Phoenix,...
    Six feet for my 47" 1080p? Man that is sitting on top of it. I did discover that I can fit that 90" Sharp in my room, if I had $10K! Perhaps some white paint and a projector will do :grin:
     
  19. Aug 12, 2012 #99 of 111
    banditt76

    banditt76 Godfather

    266
    0
    Jul 17, 2012
    I sit about 8 feet away when watching blu-ray movies on my 47" LCD. From about 10 feet back even 720p looks crystal clear to me.
     
  20. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

    21,613
    143
    Jul 25, 2002
    W.Mdtrn Sea
    If I'm not changing glasses, it would be no difference if I sit 8 or 10 feet. :p
     

Share This Page