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Any Way To Remotely Control HR2x Output Volume?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by Steve, Mar 15, 2009.

  1. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    Is it possible to control the output volume of an HR2x receiver using the DirecTV remote? I ask, because if it was, folks could take advantage of great deals like this for rooms where a 23" or 24" display is appropriate.

    It's a 23" LCD monitor with built-in speakers and HDMI input for $189 at Best Buy. Pretty good deal, IMHO. I'm guessing the speaker volume can only be controlled from the front panel of the display, which would be inconvenient, IMHO. /steve
     
  2. doctrsnoop

    doctrsnoop Godfather

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    No, there is not.
     
  3. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Note that computer monitors typically don't derive sound from the HDMI input.
     
  4. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    This monitor comes with an audio cable. /steve
     
  5. jdspencer

    jdspencer Hall Of Fame

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    I'm sure that audio cable is meant for connection to a PC audio card.

    In any case, you can't directly control the audio output of an HR2x.
     
  6. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    Agree. It's probably a mini-stereo cable (like a headphone jack). Easily adapted to standard RCA audio plugs. /steve
     
  7. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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  8. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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  9. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Without some sort of amplification, you're probably not going to get a satisfactory volume level or sound quality from line level receiver outputs that are typically designed for 75 ohms.
     
  10. Flugelman

    Flugelman Legend

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  11. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    Would work best if DirecTV offered a setup option for fixed/variable audio out and allowed the remote volume key to control the 0001 D) device. Many cable boxes work this way. /steve
     
  12. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    Here's another great LCD display deal that features DVI and audio inputs. 24" for $199! You just need an HDMI-DVI cable (or DVI-HDMI adapter) and mini-stereo to RCA adapter. /steve
     
  13. PatrickGSR94

    PatrickGSR94 AllStar

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    That display doesn't support the standard 16:9 aspect 1920x1080 HD resolution natively.

    Of course all the above discussion wouldn't matter if you plan on running the audio from the D* box to a separate receiver/stereo anyway.
     
  14. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    True, but at 16:10, would probably work well enough for a "kitchen" display. That said, this one is an equally good deal and is 1920x1080p. /steve
     
  15. thekochs

    thekochs DirecTV 10yr+ Customer

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    Cool kit for sure...cheap too.: http://www.apogeekits.com/remote_volume_control_mk164.htm
    but as stated above you might not like/get the quality you expect. Another cheap option is to amplify the analog out of the settop with: http://www.avdeals.com/hometheatcomp/amp100.htm

    You may want to even combine the above two.....buy the IR remote kit first and try....if sound is low/bad you can then get the AMP100 amp and use it to drive the signal/sound at certain level and put the IR kit after it before the TV to dampen down n the sound remotely. You'll need the RCA adapter as stated above.
     
  16. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    Those kits would definitely get the job done, but kind of defeat the original reason I was interested in one of those sub $200 23"-24" displays. They'd take up more shelf space in areas where I wouldn't want to see any more gadgets (kitchen, e.g.). And they'd add to the cost. For the extra money, I could probably just buy a 23" TV (with remote volume capability built-in) instead of a display. :) /steve
     
  17. TomCat

    TomCat Broadcast Engineer

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    While RF and video may be designed for 75 ohm impedance, consumer audio is typically designed for high impedance (50 k-ohm) at a FIXED volume level of -10 dBm. The HR2x, just like every DVR, DVD component player, or VCR, is designed to have a fixed audio output at this impedance and level so that all equipment matches all other equipment.

    The idea is that it is more of a confusing PITA to have variable audio on connected components than to have variability limited to the final global volume control. That way levels will always match when switched between, also. Level control is typically controlled by the TV volume or AVR volume.

    Having it controllable in more than one place in the chain is not only more chaotic and less predictable and convenient than having it changed in just one place, it can lead to gain-staging problems which can cause significant distortion and/or signal-to-noise ratio problems. Engineeers know how to gain stage, while consumers typically do not (nor do they want to be bothered by such tasks), which is why this system was adapted in the first place, to bring uniformity and user simplicity to what can easily grow into a complex system as more components are added.

    Of course the fly in that ointment is that TV channels don't always match or calibrate levels, and commercials are rarely calibrated to the program level, but having control over the component level directly is never a solution to that problem.

    Just because there are ways to thwart this system does not mean that thwarting it is a good idea. It usually is not, especially when one component is inadvertantly set low (with the final volume set higher than normal to compensate) and another is set high, and you knock yourself (or the wife, who will eventually leave you) out of your La-Z-boy when you switch sources because the resultant volume is suddenly now at 115 dB. Now, just try to get the baby back to sleep. The best solution is to leave the component levels (level of the HR2x itself) alone, and control levels locally with your TV or AVR volume.
     

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