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Anyone here have Cataract surgery?

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Herdfan, Oct 11, 2011.

  1. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    Last week my optometrist diagnosed me with a cataract. We had been fighting with the vision in my left eye for a month or so trying different contacts etc when he noticed it. It had not been there during my annual exam back in April, so there was really no reason for him to have been checking.

    Anyway, I have appointments scheduled with 2 different ophthalmologists in the next couple of weeks. I have been reading as much as I can about the surgery and its options. One of the options is a multi-focal lens which in theory gives you perfect 20/20 vision at distance and close-up. My parent both have the mono-focal lens, but of course they had theirs done years ago before the multi-focal lens was available. My mom has not worn glasses since, my dad has worn bi-focals even after the surgery (his was much earlier than mom's).

    My big concern is that I am young for cataracts (45), but my uncle had his removed in his late 30's, so it could be hereditary. So choosing the correct lens is of utmost importance.

    Has anyone here, or anyone you know, had cataract surgery and which lens option did you/they choose. Pluses/minuses of either.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    Make sure the ophthalmologist you choose is 'board certified', and ask how many total procedures he/she has performed and how many were completely successful. You have every right to know.
     
  3. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

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    20-20 is, or was, the ablity to read 20 point black letters on a white background at a distance of 20 feet. I prefer to call it normal vision rather than perfect vision. Those of us who are old enough to remember learning to crawl under our desk when the air raid horn sounds also remember going out into the corridor once a year to read the eye chart.

    Back around 1998, I went to have my eyes checked for the first time since I had been in high school, not counting the driving test exam. I was surprised to learn that, at age 46, it was 20-20. The eye doctor asked me if there was any reason why I though it might have been worse than that. I told her that I used to be able to read the tiny print on the glossy slips of paper that are packaged with non-prescrition medicines as rapidly as I could read street signs but now it was an effort to do so. She said that likely indicated that I previously had better than 20-20 vision and I should be pleased to have 20-20 at my age, but then she warned that from here on out, it can only stay the same or further deteriorate. I now have 20-40 near and distant.

    I often kick around the idea of having LASIK, but I am risk averse. I don't know the success/failure percentages, but of there is a 99.9% chance my vision will become better but a 0.1% chance it becomes worse, is it really worth the gamble to me?
     
  4. Cholly

    Cholly Old Guys Rule! DBSTalk Club

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    I had cataract surgery on both eyes last year and had Restor (multifocal) lenses installed. Except for slight astigmatism, my vision is close to 20/20. For the first time in 65 years (!) I've been able to do without corrective lenses except when I'm doing close reading or on the computer. The lenses are expensive, but most insurance plans cover the cost. If not, be prepared to dish out $800 or more per lens. Also, be aware that you'll need strong recommendation from your eye doctor in order to have the surgery covered by your insurance. Insurance companies worry about cataract surgery being done for vanity purposes.

    I'm totally pleased with the Restor lenses. Surgery was done outpatient one eye at a time, allowing for recovery.
     
  5. davring

    davring Hall Of Fame

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    I had cataracts removed from both eyes this year and went with single focus lenses on the recommendation of two different ophthalmologists. This is the first time in over 50 years I don't need glasses, it took a VERY long time to get used to not wearing them. I do need drugstore grade reading glasses for close work. Bascom-Palmer, in Miami performed the surgery, very quick procedure with a very minimum amount of discomfort. Bascom-Palmer is a very highly regarded center for eye care. Their web site has excellent information:http://bascompalmer.org/site/ The fees are approximately $3100.00 per eye.
     
  6. davring

    davring Hall Of Fame

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    AntAltMike quote;
    I often kick around the idea of having LASIK, but I am risk averse. I don't know the success/failure percentages, but of there is a 99.9% chance my vision will become better but a 0.1% chance it becomes worse, is it really worth the gamble to me?[/QUOTE]

    My younger brother and sister both had LASIK about 10-15 years ago, and both had to have, what was called a "touchup", a couple of years ago, to correct their vision again.
     
  7. mattgwyther

    mattgwyther Member

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    Had cataract surgery 18yrs ago when I was 18. Outside of clouding on the back membrane no issues. They did a PAM (possible acuity measure)1 test on me I could actually see the clouding.

    My right eye was correctable to 20/40. First day post op 20/15 un corrected.
     
  8. wilbur_the_goose

    wilbur_the_goose Hall Of Fame

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    At 34, my wife had a cataract removed. Took about 15 minutes and there was no pain.

    You must, however, use the post-procedure eye drops and follow every instruction to the letter.
     
  9. mystic7

    mystic7 Icon

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    While I've been wearing glasses since I was 10, my twin brother had better than 20-20 vision (20-10 I believe, which means he saw at 20 feet what normal eyes would see at 10 feet). He kept his 20-10 vision until 50 at which point it "deteriorated" to 20-20. Now, at 57 he needs to use reading glasses, but more or less does everything else without glasses, whereas I now have to strap coke bottles to my face to see. What was the question again?
     
  10. Cholly

    Cholly Old Guys Rule! DBSTalk Club

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    Re: Eyedrops -- Absolutely! You have to instill drops in the eye both before and after the surgery. AIRC, there were three different eyedrops I had to use, with very strict instructions for their use. I also had to wear a protective eyecap at night after the surgery for about a week.
     
  11. Getteau

    Getteau Icon

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    My younger brother and sister both had LASIK about 10-15 years ago, and both had to have, what was called a "touchup", a couple of years ago, to correct their vision again.[/QUOTE]

    I had LASIK in 1999 and I'm still running between 20-20 in the day and 20-40 at night. Before procedure, I was in the -6.5's for my lenses. I'm blue-eyed and my only issue is night vision because the lasers at the time didn't correct well enough for people whose eyes dilate a lot at night (mainly blue-eyed people). I went back a few years later when the lasers were better and my eye doctor said it wouldn’t be worth it because they only guaranteed to get you to 20-40. I'm not sure if that has changed recently, but if you are in the 20-40 range today, it’s probably not worth it.
     
  12. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    Glasses for reading I can handle, but if possible, I don't want them for computer work. Right now it is only one eye, so I could do mono-vision which is what my current contacts are. From my reading, both my slight astigmatism (too slight for astigmatism contacts, but too much for "crisp" vision) and presbyopia (deteriorating close vision) can be corrected. Insurance won't cover these corrections, but it might be worth it to pay the extra.

    Thanks for everyone's insights (PI :)) Having never worried about surgeries on other body parts, but when it comes to eyes, that is a different story.
     
  13. e4123

    e4123 AllStar

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    I had voluntary lens replacement surgery and had the crystal lens installed. I could not be happier. Beware however, you may have to go back in a few years if the cataract returns and starts to cloud the replacement lens.
     
  14. Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    Emailed a friend who had cataracts. Her eyes are now extra sensitive to bright light.
     
  15. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    Mine have always been that way so Polarized sunglasses are a constant companion.

    I wore these until they took them off the market. Let me tell you, the orange ones made you look possessed. One night after a softball game we went to a local pizza place and the waitress kept staring at me. Then I realized why. Since I would have been driving home in the dark, I went and changed contacts and then she stared at me some more. :)

    But they were great for softball as you could really pick up the ball quicker than with sunglasses.
     
  16. scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

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    Prescription sunglasses are my constant companion also. BLind as a bat - but once my visual acuity is corrected - I'm like a cat in the dark.
     
  17. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    Had my originally scheduled consult today. Went pretty well.

    I had already been to what was really my second opinion. He was the guy who did my parent's surgeries, but he was no longer doing surgery, so I also met his replacement. Not impressed at all. So they became my second opinion.

    But the guy i met with today, was great. He is who my optometrist referred me to and I see why. Downside is I had to go to Lenscrafters and get some glasses because he needs me out of contacts for a week before he can take detailed eye measurements.

    Now the big question is multi-focal or not. He seems pretty pleased with the ReStor multi focal IOL. He put one in his wife, so ....... Most people do great, but some have issues. I need to find out what to do when people have issues. Is it removed and replaced? Glassses or contacts?

    Looks like the surgery will be mid-December. Was going to wait until January to get both surgeries (I have one in my other eye as well) under one deductible, but it seems my health insurance has a 4Q deductible carry-over, so I am good there.

    Looks like it will be an interesting couple of months.
     
  18. treecastle

    treecastle AllStar

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    I had both eyes done last February/March and since Medicare only pays for single focus, that's what I got. Bottom line my eyes are 20/15 (both), but I do need readers for close up.
     
  19. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    How is your intermediate vision? Say 2-3 feet. Like looking at a computer.
     
  20. treecastle

    treecastle AllStar

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    If I sit 2-3 feet from the screen, I don't need readers. When driving I see all the gauges without readers. This surgery was without a doubt the best thing for me. I went from 20/200 to 20/15. The detail I see now is just beyond compare. I didn't realize how much I was missing plus the cataracts put a beige tint on everything which became so very obvious after the first eye was done.
     

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