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Are New MPEG-4 Channels 1920x1080?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by RickD_99, Sep 26, 2007.

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  1. Milominderbinder2

    Milominderbinder2 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '08

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    That is one of the test patterns HDNet broadcasts once a week, usually in the early monrning on Saturday or Sunday.

    This HDnet Test Pattern shows a full 1920x1080i.

    That does not prove that they will have full 1920x1080i on every new channel just that they have provided 1920x1080 on HDnet.

    To my eyes, the other new HD channels are as sharp as HDnet. The color depth also seems as good.

    - Craig
     
  2. jrmichael

    jrmichael Legend

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    I wouldn't plan on seeing 1080p anytime soon as that is dictated by the content providers, D* can only distribute what is provided. On the bright side, there is Blu-Ray and HD-DVD for your 1080p TV.
     
  3. techrep

    techrep Hall Of Fame

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    Sep 15, 2007
    Yes, and are you "format neutral?" :D
     
  4. Dusty

    Dusty Icon

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    No. There are still 1080 lines. Only half of them are updated per frame.
     
  5. techrep

    techrep Hall Of Fame

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    Sep 15, 2007
    That's ok, we have nanoseconds to spare. :D
     
  6. bigben7

    bigben7 AllStar

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    CNN - 1080i DD5.1
    ESPN - 720p DD5.1
    ESPN2 - 720p DD5.1
    NFL - 1080i DD2.0
    BTN - 720p DD2.0
    TNT - 1080i DD5.1
    TBS - 720p DD5.1
    A&E - 720p DD2.0
    SMTH - 1080i DD5.1
    HIST - 720p DD2.0
    DSC - 1080i DD5.1
    TLC - 720p DD5.1
    APL - 1080i DD5.1
    SCI - 1080i DD5.1
    TWC - 1080i DD2.0
    VSGF - 1080i DD2.0
    UHD - 1080i DD5.1
    HDT - 1080i DD5.1
    HDNM - 1080i DD5.1
    HDN - 1080i DD5.1
     
  7. medic4jc7

    medic4jc7 Guest

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    My local news went HD last month in 1080i. When they did. I switched from OTA to the HR20 just to see if there was a change in PQ. Really. I saw no difference at all. None. The Chief Engineer at the station runs are video and sound at church for broadcast. And he states there isnt enough of a difference to see with the naked eye. On the equipment scopes at the station is so minor. No one will know.
     
  8. JeffBowser

    JeffBowser blah blah blah

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    Are you talking about channel 5 ? I love your below statements, I try to make this point to people all the time, but for some reason, it really, really riles up the purists.

     
  9. d max82

    d max82 Godfather

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    Actually, all 1080 are updated in each frame. 540 are updated in each field.
     
  10. medic4jc7

    medic4jc7 Guest

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    Yes i am. Ive known Dave McKinley for 12 years. I remeber when he got hired at WPTV. Now he is the Chief Engineer.
     
  11. medic4jc7

    medic4jc7 Guest

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    May 22, 2007
    He shows up at times on the West Palm Thread at AVS Forum and answers questions.
     
  12. JeffBowser

    JeffBowser blah blah blah

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    Yeah, I've had a few e-mails with him, he's a good guy, but I haven't seen him on the WestPalm AVS forum section in awhile. I didn't know he went to church, good for him!

     
  13. Jeremy W

    Jeremy W Hall Of Fame

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    Jun 19, 2006
    No it can't. The receivers scale the signal internally up to 1920x1080i or 1280x720p. They'll never output 1280x1080i.
     
  14. medic4jc7

    medic4jc7 Guest

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    If you follow the electronic display market as I do, you know that one of the hot topics now is "1080p." More specifically, it means having a front projector, rear-projection monitor, or flat-panel display with true 1920x1080 pixel progressive-scan imaging. 1920x1080 is significant for a number of reasons.

    It's a legacy HDTV format that evolved from the original 1,152-line analog standard used in Japan and is also a common display standard for TVs and personal computers. Finally, 1920x1080 interlaced TV is the most popular picture format for HDTV distribution via satellite, cable, or over-the-air.

    It would seem that everyone wants to have electronic displays capable of showing every one of those 2,073,600 pixels, and that anything with lower resolution would be a compromise. But would it? Right now, the most common display formats for computer screens and TVs are all grouped around 720 to 768 vertical lines/pixels. LCD TVs all have 1280x768 (Wide XGA) resolution. Plasma monitors from 42 inches to 65 inches have 1024x768 non-square or 1280/1365/1366x768 pixel matrices. Rear-projection HDTVs come with microdisplays that use 1280x768 or 1280x720 imaging devices. Widescreen front projectors for home theater and commercial use are equipped with 1280x720 and 1366x768 chips and panels.

    There are plenty of products out there that can support native 720p (921,600 total pixels) HD programs, and of course all of these products will show 1080i as well with some pixel decimation (about 29 percent) to fit the smaller screen. So why aren't these products sufficient?

    To best answer the question of how much resolution is required to show HDTV, bear in mind that our current analog TV system assumed way back in the early 1940s that TV screen sizes would never exceed 20 inches diagonally (that works out to about 12 inches vertically with a 4:3 aspect ratio). The optimal seating distance was then calculated to be 7.1 times the screen height when showing 525-line interlaced video, or around 8 feet with a 20-inch TV.

    It was determined that at that distance, the human eye would not be able to make out the interlaced picture scan lines and the images would appear to be smooth with high resolution. Consider that at a viewing distance of 12 inches, the visual acuity of the normal human eye is 0.0035 inches. At 120 inches (10X), that number would drop by a factor of ten (0.035).

    In a 50-inch plasma display with an array of 1366x768 pixels, the pitch of individual pixels is typically less than 1 mm (about 0.9 mm), which equals 0.039 inches. Do the math, and you'll see that standing 10 feet from a 50-inch plasma means you can barely perceive the HD pixel structure, and that's only if you have 20-20 vision.

    To jam 1920x1080 pixels into that same 50-inch screen size means we'd have to shrink the pitch of each pixel to 0.025 inches. And I'll bet the average person couldn't tell the difference.

    Remember that the optimal viewing distance from an HD (1920x1080) display is 3.1X the screen height. In other words, you can sit farther back, but you shouldn't sit any closer to avoid seeing picture scan lines. At a distance of 10 feet, the differences between a 1080p and 720p image in a 50-inch projected image will be hard to spot, particularly if created with fine-pitch microdisplays such as LCoS and DLP.
     
  15. 40yearfan

    40yearfan AllStar

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    Aug 8, 2007
    Not if you count the lines between the lines.;)
     
  16. aramus8

    aramus8 Godfather

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    Nov 20, 2006
    Note...If your 1080p TV doesn't look good with the current HD channels and their current bit streams, take it back or adjust the settings.
     
  17. GenoV

    GenoV Legend

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    Sep 12, 2007
    Very nice description of the whole 'resolution' issue. Kudos!
     
  18. medic4jc7

    medic4jc7 Guest

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    May 22, 2007
    :icon_bb: Thanks!
     
  19. LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

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    Middle...
    THANK YOU! :)
     
  20. bobkatF

    bobkatF AllStar

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    Mesa, AZ
    Well said, thanks!

    Now, if I could get a 1920 x 1280 image of your avatar....................
     
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