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Bariatric Surgery

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Rich, Feb 14, 2013.

  1. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    For those wanting a quick fix concerning their weight and the problems associated with being obese, this actually works. But you have to be really overweight and meet all the standards for the operation. Anyone had this done? Any problems with it? I'll give my reason for this thread if it continues for a while. Here's a link to WebMd and Bariatric surgery.

    Rich
     
  2. lwilli201

    lwilli201 Hall Of Fame

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    Glad that it worked out for you. Did you get the lap band? It is not a decision to be taken lightly.

    For anyone contemplating have this done, the very first thing you need to talk to your doctor about is the type of bypass you will get. The gastric bypass is not reversible. The doctor that did the gastric bypass on a dear friend will not do the lap band because so many people know it is reversible and have a tendency to want it reversed when the eating craves takes hold. My friend had a psychiatric evaluation to determine if she was truly committed to the surgery. This type surgery is orthoscopic which makes it less evasive. The process is primarily mental. You have to deal with eating about 2 oz of food around 6 times a day. You will also be required to take many vitamins to supplement your diet. My friend has had no problems with her bypass. You must however make sure you have you vitamin levels check at least once a year.
     
  3. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I didn't have it done.

    True. A couple women we know were so obese that the surgeons had to wait until they opened them up to see if the "sleeve" would work. Both needed the bypass. One of them had that done early last year and you would not recognize her, I didn't. The other one has lost over 50 pounds since the bypass a couple months ago.

    Yup, even with the less invasive sleeve the stomach might revert to its original size if the person is stupid enough to eat heavily.

    That seems to be standard procedure. Having half your stomach removed seems rather insane to me.

    I think you meant arthroscopic surgery, but I knew what you meant. It definitely is a life changing experience and that's something you have to really think over. The band is too easy to have removed and you know you're going to eat like a horse for awhile. And the vitamins are expensive.

    So, if you're willing to commit to a life changing procedure, it seems like a good idea.

    Rich
     
  4. lwilli201

    lwilli201 Hall Of Fame

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    "I think you meant arthroscopic surgery"

    My bad :(.
     
  5. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Easy mistake to make, normally wouldn't have mentioned it, but I wanted to clarify it.

    Appears to be not much interest in this thread. Thought there would be more interest in the subject since we are a nation of fat folks who are probably gonna have to do something along these lines sometime in the future. I think it's not how long you live, but how well, physically, that you live. If a couple hours under the knife can put you back on track to healthy living, I know I'd do it if I were desperate enough. Just the thought of having a scalpel cutting my stomach apart gives me the willies.

    Well, I'll give it a couple more days and then tell what made me start this thread. In the meantime, if you're fat, if your BMI is way out of wack, if you can't climb a flight of stairs without losing your breath, you might find something of interest in this thread.

    And if you're on the verge of type 2 diabetes, this is the answer.

    Rich
     
  6. RasputinAXP

    RasputinAXP Kwisatz Haderach of Cordcuttery

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    I have a few friends and family members who have gone this route. Some of them don't succeed. I'd be lying if I said I didn't consider it.

    But it feels like giving up.
     
  7. klang

    klang Hall Of Fame

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    My wife had the gastric bypass a year and a half ago. I'd be dead meat if she knew I was discussing it here. :) Supposed to be a secret more of less. Dropped 60 pounds in the first year.

    First couple months were a pain, working to get back to regular food again. Learning by trial and error what her new plumbing will and won't tolerate. Mostly back to normal diet now although much smaller quantities.

    I wasn't really in favor of it, seemed pretty drastic to me but she hadn't had any results from the many diets tried over the years.
     
  8. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    For some reason at a Dr. visit they had a pamphlet explaining the surgery and the foods you would eat after the surgery. If you just at the foods you have to eat after the surgery, the surgery might not be necessary. It was a very restrictive list.
     
  9. klang

    klang Hall Of Fame

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    Yep, Dr. gave us a game plan for about the first four months I think it was. Started out with broth then high protein liquids. Part of the time I was basically making baby food in a blender. I think it was a month before solid foods started.
     
  10. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I can't get past the idea of having your stomach hacked in half just to lose weight. Just about any diet will work if you can stick to it. I realize sticking to a diet is the hard part.

    Rich
     
  11. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Was she having health problems associated with her weight? Such as type 2 diabetes?

    Rich
     
  12. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I know what that list looks like. If you can find protein drinks you can actually drink (I tasted a lot of different protein drinks and they disgusted me. Finally found a brand at a Costco that was enjoyable) and follow that diet religiously, you will definitely lose weight.

    Rich
     
  13. sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    That's why the surgery is done... you're physically forced to "diet" by eating substantially less.
     
  14. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I do understand that. Just got the shivers thinking about it again. I'd rather diet.

    Few more folks chime in and I'll tell y'all why I started the thread.

    Rich
     
  15. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Here's what I know.
    • One friend had the surgery and called while driving (?) and eating french fries from MacDonalds.
    • One relative had the surgery and complained about a liverwurst sandwich making her sick.
    Both are slowly gaining their weight back.

    IMHO if you do the surgery to avoid having to change your diet, it won't work. If you can change your diet, except in extreme cases you might not need the surgery.

    I've been overweight all my adult life, so I'm sympathetic up to a point.
     
  16. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    The particular surgery I'm gonna tell about was done for the patient's health. And you can gain the weight back. Why anyone would go thru that operation and let that weight come back is beyond me.

    More on this when I get back to my comfy laptop. I'll tell all then.

    Rich
     
  17. Scott Kocourek

    Scott Kocourek Well-Known Member

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    A person I know through work had this done many years ago, he was getting to the point where he could barely walk. After the surgery he was probably 1/4 of the weight he was when he started.

    FF 8 +/- years and he's getting close to fitting his old pants again. It sucks.
     
  18. klang

    klang Hall Of Fame

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    Nope, no diabetes issue. It was mentioned strongly by the surgeon during some of the lectures we went to before signing up.

    I think her issue was mostly self esteem. She was just over the BMI figure used to justify the surgery. She tried many diets over the years, I don't think she really stuck to any of them. This was the 'easy' way out.

    I do most of the cooking and I was put on blood pressure meds a year ago so our diet has changed and we are both exercising. She hasn't put any weight back on so far.
     
  19. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

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    As I have chronicled in another thread, I lost 50 pounds in one year and fifteen pounds the next year by eating a little less. I didn't exercise, I didn't rigidly stick to my diet, and I'm sure I have eaten more junk food in the last two years than most of you have eaten in your lifetimes.

    I'm now within ten pounds of the weight the insurance charts say correlates to those people my age who live the longest. My blood pressure has gone down from typically 140-160/90-95 to 120-130/80-85.

    My sister is 5'4" and weighs about 300 pounds and, if you can even imagine this, it is a relatively misshapen 300 pounds, as in, I don't think I have seen any circus clowns with their bodies so mis-shapen. Over a decade ago, I bought her a treadmill, which immediately became a $700 coat rack. A few years back, I looked into paying for gastric surgery for her but when I found out how much it costs, I couldn't afford it.

    My sister apparently inherited a ton of money a few years back. I say apparently because she has not mentioned it and even denied it when I asked her about it, but she has been throwing money up in the air like it is confetti for a few years now, though I have never been downwind of any of it. When I told her I had looked into gastric surgery for her but couldn't afford it, she told me she had looked into it herself but had to pass on it for some medical reason, while never expressing a word of reservation about its price. My sister is content to blame our mother and grandmother for her figure. When our mother was 40, she probably weighted under 140 pounds, and peaked in her sixties at maybe 170 pounds.

    I now notice how many people are overweight. I mean, I used to hear this news item and that news item about the growing obesity problem in this country, but I really never gave it much mind. Now, I see all these fat people, who aren't half as much overweight as I was, and think, "How in hell can you be like that? Why don't you eat less and lose weight?"
     
  20. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    A couple of comments like this in this thread. I'll add another. I have a friend who had the surgery several years ago. For a couple of years he looked, and felt, great. But just like the person Scott knows, he's been putting the weight back on for 2 or 3 years now.

    It will only work for someone if they are willing to stick to the total process, not just have the operation thinking it will, by itself, solve all their weight problems.
     

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