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Bariatric Surgery

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Rich, Feb 14, 2013.

  1. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    That amazes me. To go thru that operation and not change the way you eat boggles the mind. My neighbor knows a woman that had the surgery, had plastic surgery to get rid of the skin flaps and then gained it all back.

    Rich
     
  2. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I don't know enough about diabetes to really comment, but I know it's something I don't want to be diagnosed with.

    Self esteem is something we rarely talk about and it's so important to most women. And men.

    Smart, that's just smart. Good for her. All I hear about is people having the surgery and gaining the weight back.

    Rich
     
  3. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Good post! I don't have to imagine a 300 pound woman, I know a few. I know one that's brushing up to 300 and she wears two-piece bathing suits at the beach. That's really gross.

    Rich
     
  4. sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Are you amazed when alcoholics relapse? Drug addicts reuse? Food addiction is no different.
     
  5. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    My wife had the "sleeve" surgery on December 19th.

    Before I go any further, let me tell you about my wife. When we got married, she was 26. Looked great. Then, over the years, she slowly gained weight. She tried dieting and I dieted with her. She'd lose weight and then start gaining it again. In other words, all the diets worked, as I knew they would, but she was unwilling or unable to stick with them.

    One of the reasons she couldn't stick with the diets was her job. She's an executive with a very large, very prosperous company. She has to spend a lot of time in meetings and they are usually catered. Temptation. She has traveled all over the world on business trips and, again, temptation. How do you go to places like Paris and Singapore and not eat?

    Then she began having heart problems. I begged her to do something about her weight. Her cardiologist told her the same thing, lose weight. Then, she announced she was on the verge of type 2 diabetes. Constantly monitoring her blood sugar, charting the results for her doctor. I went to WebMD, and saw what T2 diabetes can do and got on her again about her weight.

    So, she started exercising, which is an act of futility unless you're a fanatic about it. She thought 20 or 30 minutes a couple times a week on a treadmill or elliptical machine (she has access to a fitness center where she works) would cut the weight off. All the exercising did was make her hungry. So, she gained more weight.

    Finally, last summer, she announced that she was gonna go for the Bariatric surgery. She admitted she just could not stop eating. And she ate fast, which is not a good thing, you need time to feel full or you'll just keep eating.

    OK, sounded like she had her mind made up. She also said that she didn't care if our medical plan would cover it, she'd pay for it herself.

    But, her BMI was such that she wouldn't qualify for the surgery under our plan. So she started really eating (dragging me along for the ride, she's a good cook, hard not to eat a lot when she cooks) and got her BMI almost up to where she needed it to be. Meanwhile her close friend had the surgery, went in for the "sleeve" and the surgeons ended up doing the bypass. She weighed close to 300 pounds and when the surgeons tried the sleeve method they ended up having to do the bypass. She was so fat, they had no real idea what they would find when they tried the arthroscopic surgery and quickly shifted to the bypass

    Her friend lost over 50 pounds in a couple months and my wife was even more convinced that surgery was the way to go. So, she really began eating more and more and finally had all the requirements for the surgery and our health plan would cover the cost. Wish I could give you a figure for the whole process, but the surgeon's cost was at least $7,000.

    Meanwhile, I gained 25 pounds!

    December 19th finally rolls around and I take her to the hospital, totally convinced she's gonna die on the table. (I'm a pessimist, what else would you expect me to think?)

    She gets all prepped and the nurses are telling us that this will be easiest surgery she's ever had, the doctor's great, blah, blah, blah.

    I go sit in a waiting room and start figuring out how I'm gonna live without her. How I'm gonna explain this to my son and my granddaughter. The phone calls I'm gonna have to make, everything bad.

    Then, I see on a display that the surgery is over and she survived! The doctor comes down to the waiting room and tells me everything went well. (One of the great pleasures of being a pessimist is being wrong!).

    Next step is the recovery room. I've been in a few recovery rooms and I expected to see her sitting up and doped up. Nope, puking, crying, in such distress that I asked the nurse why I was called to see her in this condition. She told me my wife was in a lot more pain than normal. Now, I'm worried again. Finally, she's stabilized and gets into a room. What was supposed to be an operation one day and go home the next day turns into a 2 night stay.

    I finally get to take her home and she's cranky, which is understandable. Normally she's nice and happy. Takes over a month before she's back to herself again.

    So far, she's lost about 40 pounds and is adhering to her diet, mainly because she gets sick if she eats to much or eats too fast.

    They did the operation arthroscopically and she has four small cuts on her belly which have healed. The cardiologist has taken her off all the meds he was giving her. Our doctor takes her off the diabetes meds and she seems to be sticking to her diet and taking the special mix of supplements that is required after the surgery. Now she's losing weight at a slower rate which is good. She's started exercising again in the hope that she won't need plastic surgery and it looks like she won't. So far.

    Oh, since she had the operation, I've lost the 25 pounds I gained and I'm on my way back down to where I want to be.

    I recently asked her if she'd recommend the surgery to anyone and she said she wouldn't. Just too painful.

    Rich
     
  6. sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Good luck to her. :)
     
  7. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Good point. But neither alcoholics or most other addicts have surgery for their addictions. Painful surgeries. But I can't ignore all the stories about folks relapsing after having this surgery, I just don't get it. To go thru all that and just ignore the warnings by the doctors...I dunno.

    Rich
     
  8. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Thanx. How you doing?

    Rich
     
  9. sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Really well, thanks bud.
     
  10. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Yup, no matter what you read, what diet you follow, it's all about the calories. Unless you have another medical problem or take medicine that slows weight loss.

    Yup again. Lose the weight and the blood pressure goes down. Think of how hard the heart has to work to pump blood thru veins that are surrounded by fat.

    I've got one of those treadmill coat racks too. Had an elliptical machine before that. Used to put all kinds of things on that. We gave that away to a woman who is now using it for her coats... :lol:

    A gym membership makes a lot more sense to me than buying equipment for use at home. Some folks do use them, but I think most folks don't.

    Must be a way of excusing herself for being so heavy.

    It's not just the adults who have this problem, it's the kids too. For them, they're probably trapped. My son's pretty heavy. Last summer we took a ride to a bike shop and he bought a nice looking bike. Rode it once, too hot to ride in the summer, and now it sits in my garage.

    Rich
     
  11. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Did some reading about pneumonia, never had it and was curious. Scary. Even scarier for you, I'd think. Glad everything's OK now.

    Rich
     
  12. klang

    klang Hall Of Fame

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    My wife was in the hospital 3 or 4 nights but that was the plan from the start. They kept her pretty doped but she was in a lot of pain. I think she spent another week at home on meds before going back to work.

    Our insurance didn't cover any of it under any circumstances. I believe the bill was about 9 grand.
     
  13. TXD16

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    There is simply no substitute for basic human self-control. And, as with many human traits, some people seem to have it in abundance, while others seem to be lacking completely.

    That said, equating true chemical (drug or alcohol) addictions with purported food "addictions" demonstrates a fairly obvious lack of understanding of both, which is to say that true chemical addictions create physical dependencies that upon the sudden cessation of the addicted chemical can, and often does, result in withdrawal symptoms so severe that death is a very real and immediate possibility without medical intervention.

    On the other hand, although we would all expire with some intake of nourishment, so-called food "addictions" are of a purely psychological nature.

    Then again (is this the third hand?), although the human body can function perfectly well without the intake of distilled alcohol or manufactured hallucinogenic chemicals, it cannot do so without some intake of food, so, then, which is harder to control, that with which one can dispense with completely or that with which one must partake to survive?
     
  14. Lord Vader

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    I had the R&Y done on Dec. 20, 2006. Originally scheduled for 12-27-06, my surgeon decided he wanted to go on vacation, so the procedure was done on the 20th, which kind of sucked for one big reason--no partaking in all the wonderful Christmas food. I had to sit downstairs at my folks' house on Christmas day smelling the wonderful meal my mom prepared, while I was relegated to chicken broth for the first 2 weeks following surgery.

    I lost 28 pounds in the first 2 weeks. Prior to surgery I was 342. Following surgery in less than 6 months, I was down to 228. Not bad.

    I didn't approach this lightly. I had tried numerous diets, plans, etc. My doctor told me that since I had my gall bladder removed in 1986, losing weight for me would be more difficult. Therefore, for that and other reasons, I opted for the R&Y procedure, which is, I believe, the most radical and serious of all the weight loss surgeries.

    My surgeon was a guy who practically wrote the book on the procedure. Before he would even agree to do it, he required me to see a psychiatrist to discuss my reasons and my attitude, etc. He also required me to see a nutrionist to discuss a better diet. I also had to attend some group sessions of people who had the procedure to learn the pros and cons of it.

    Pros are many, cons are few, but they are substantial.

    A little more than 6 years after my procedure, I'm at about 85-90 lbs. less than where I was before the surgery. It's a long battle to drop another 50 or so, but I keep trying.
     
  15. Lord Vader

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    The R&Y bypass is the most invasive and serious of all the weight loss surgeries, and mine was done via the slice 'em up method--no arthroscopic procedure for me. I have the scar to prove it.

    I didn't have diabetes or high blood pressure or any other serious health risk, but I knew that at 342 and just turning 40 that year wasn't good. One big incentive was the fact that my health insurance paid for EVERYTHING except a $250 hospital deductible. The total for the whole bill was over $60,000. I had the procedure done on a weekday morning at 8:00 a.m. and was discharged two days later at 5:00 p.m. I was sore and a little weak, but I was otherwise fine.

    I have been trying to get my sister, who is 42, to get this done, because (a.) she is over 300 lbs, (b.) a heavy smoker, and (c.) is a single mom to a 12-year-old girl. What happens if my sister should drop dead because of her health? IMHO, my sister is a walking time bomb.

    Having the surgery has radically changed my life in several respects, chief among them not just how much I eat but what I eat/drink. I have to watch my sugar intake, especially in liquid form. I get drunk a LOT faster--MUCH faster, believe me--so much so that I am a very cheap date now. One glass of wine or one glass of hard liquor and I'm am buzzed, sometimes dramatically.

    Despite this, I would recommend this to people who are serious and willing to go through all the requirements beforehand.
     
  16. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Would have made me happy if they would have kept her in the hospital a couple more nights. Here in NJ, they get you out of the hospital as quickly as they can. She was in a lot of pain for a few days after the operation.

    9Gs? I'd think it's a lot higher here. Costs between $20,000 and $30,000 just to have a baby. This info was gathered from a couple guys in the gas can line after Sandy hit. One of them, a state trooper, told me his child's recent birth costs hit $32,000 IIRC. He saw the bill.

    Rich
     
  17. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Interesting question. We keep no snacks or stuff like that in the house. No ice cream, no cakes or pastries. Especially no bagels. I'm perfectly capable of eating a half gallon of ice cream or a whole cake (well, a small one) in one sitting. I know I'll pay a price for that gluttony during the night, but I can't stop myself. And bagels. I hear them calling me when they get in the house. Simply not buying that stuff solves those problems and going shopping for food without eating first is another mistake we make occasionally.

    To get back to your question: I think we can live without carbs, but we do need protein and fat. They are essential. I've gone months with practically no carbs and nothing bad has happened to me. Lose weight a lot quicker if you do that.

    Rich
     
  18. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I think if my wife and I hadn't been told that this would be the quickest, easiest, least painful surgery she'd ever had/have she might have expressed a different opinion. The surgeon said it went as planned and he was puzzled about her pain.

    Rich
     
  19. klang

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    I suspect there are different rates when there is no insurance involved. The surgeon is probably getting a volume discount from the hospital as well.
     
  20. Cholly

    Cholly Old Guys Rule! DBSTalk Club

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    I'm anticipating having arthroscopic surgery for a severe hiatal hernia soon and will be placed on a restrictive diet -- no meat or bread and who knows what else - for a period of several weeks. I'm wondering just what brand of protein drink you found at Costco that tasted good. I've been looking there myself and have wondered which one might be best.
     

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