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Blockbuster Video-Rental Chain Will Shut All U.S. Stores

Discussion in 'General DISH™ Discussion' started by tsmacro, Nov 6, 2013.

  1. Nov 6, 2013 #1 of 34
    tsmacro

    tsmacro Hall Of Fame

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    Blockbuster LLC, the video-rental company owned by Dish Network Corp. (DISH), will close its remaining 300 U.S. stores, ending an era for a chain that was once a ubiquitous part of American shopping centers.
    Blockbuster will shut the outlets by early January and also discontinue its DVD-by-mail service by the middle of next month, Englewood, Colorado-based Dish said today in a statement. The company will keep the licensing rights to the Blockbuster brand and use it with Dish services. It also has a video-streaming product called Blockbuster On Demand.

    See the rest here:

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-11-06/blockbuster-video-rental-chain-will-shut-remaining-u-s-stores.html
     
  2. Nov 6, 2013 #2 of 34
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Leapin' Lizard Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    [​IMG]

    Blockbuster to End Domestic Retail, DVD By Mail Services

    • Blockbuster to close remaining U.S. company-owned stores, DVD By Mail services by early-January 2014
    • Franchised and licensed stores in the U.S. and abroad to remain open for business
    ENGLEWOOD, Colo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- DISH Network Corporation (NASDAQ: DISH) today announced that its subsidiary, Blockbuster L.L.C., will end its retail and by mail DVD distribution operations by early-January 2014. The company will close its approximately 300 remaining U.S.-based retail stores, as well as its distribution centers.

    "This is not an easy decision, yet consumer demand is clearly moving to digital distribution of video entertainment," said Joseph P. Clayton, DISH president and chief executive officer. "Despite our closing of the physical distribution elements of the business, we continue to see value in the Blockbuster brand, and we expect to leverage that brand as we continue to expand our digital offerings."
    The Blockbuster By Mail service will end mid-December and will serve existing customers until that time.

    Over the past 18 months, Blockbuster has divested itself of assets in the United States, as well international assets, including operations in the United Kingdom and Scandinavia. DISH will continue to support Blockbuster's domestic and international franchise operations, relationships and agreements.

    BLOCKBUSTER'S FUTURE
    DISH will retain licensing rights to the Blockbuster brand, and key assets, including the company's significant video library. DISH will focus on delivering the Blockbuster @Home service to DISH customers, and on its transactional streaming service for the general market, Blockbuster On Demand.

    The Blockbuster @Home service offers over 15 movie channels including STARZ® Cinema, EPIX®, Sony Movie Channel, and Hallmark Movie Channel, plus over 20,000 movies and TV shows streamed to TVs, computers or iPads®. The service includes access to the Blockbuster @Home ‘app' currently available to the millions of TVs served by DISH's Hopper® Whole-Home HD DVR set-top box.
    Available to anyone, Blockbuster On Demand is a transactional streaming video service offering thousands of movies viewable on connected devices including PCs, tablets, smartphones, Slingbox, Roku and select Samsung TVs and Blu-ray players. Consumers can learn more at www.blockbusternow.com.

    About DISH
    DISH Network Corporation (NASDAQ: DISH), through its subsidiary DISH Network L.L.C., provides approximately 14.014 million satellite TV customers, as of June 30, 2013, with the highest quality programming and technology with the most choices at the best value, including HD Free for Life®. Subscribers enjoy the largest high definition line-up, the most international channels, and award-winning HD and DVR technology. DISH Network Corporation is a Fortune 200 company. Visit www.dish.com.

    Cautionary Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Statements
    Certain statements contained herein may constitute "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of DISH Network Corporation to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. More information about such risks, uncertainties and other factors is set forth in DISH Network Corporation's Disclosure Regarding Forward-Looking Statements included in its recent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including its annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2012 and its quarterly reports on Form 10-Q for the quarterly periods ended March 31, 2013 and June 30, 2013. The forward-looking statements speak only as of the date made, and DISH Network Corporation expressly disclaims any obligation to update these forward-looking statements.
     
  3. Nov 6, 2013 #3 of 34
    tenwinecans

    tenwinecans Cool Member

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    oh great.. .now where am I going to find teenage store employees to make sarcastic comments about the DVD and Blu-ray discs that I rent?
     
  4. Nov 7, 2013 #4 of 34
    BillJ

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    Family Video seems to thrive in smaller communities. I'm sure they have some sarcastic teenagers.
     
  5. Nov 7, 2013 #5 of 34
    tonyd79

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    I know it is the way of the world. Streaming has overtaken brick and mortar DVD stores but it really is a shame. Redbox just doesn't satisfy the impulse need for quality picture (not enough selection) and Netflix mail order is not impulsive enough. Streaming and on demand have gotten better but still nowhere near the quality of a blu ray.
     
  6. Nov 7, 2013 #6 of 34
    DoyleS

    DoyleS Icon

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    Pretty much old news as all of the stores in my area have been closed for quite awhile.
    RedBox does well for me for the occasional rental as they are close, they carry Blu-Ray and often have discount coupons.
    At this point, the networks have more than enough material to satisfy me.
     
  7. Nov 7, 2013 #7 of 34
    Rduce

    Rduce Legend

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    I am not sure where you live or what your streaming speed is, but I use a Roku 3 set at 1080P and stream from Amazon, Hulu and Netflix and I have superb picture quality. Of course my internet speed is well over 40 mbs thru my local cable company.
     
  8. Nov 7, 2013 #8 of 34
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Leapin' Lizard Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I think some (not forum posters, people in general) are mixing info and concluding things that may or may not be true.

    I do not believe "streaming taking over" is the reason for decline of Blockbuster rental business. I believe poor customer service is what did that.

    When Blockbuster was the up-and-comer many years ago, they had clean stores with plenty of copies of movies, and were ahead of the curve... as they grew, they did what so many companies do... and became complacent and let go of the little things that had put them on top.

    Poor management took down Blockbuster... not a shift to streaming... Dish bought a bankrupt company, so Dish has no blame in what happened... and they just chose not to invest more into it themselves.

    Years ago Blockbuster just stopped being a place I needed to go... I wasn't renting many movies and was actually getting all the TV I needed from cable/satellite TV, LONG before internet streaming became a thing.
     
  9. Nov 7, 2013 #9 of 34
    tsmacro

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    I stopped going to the video store oh probably about 10 years ago because of DVR's. I always have so much recorded that I need to keep up with it didn't make sense to go to the video store and spend more time and money when I have plenty to watch already recorded waiting for me at home. It had nothing to do with NetFlix or streaming video for me.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Family Video
    "We are the largest movie and game rental chain in the United States. We operate more than 775 Family Video stores in 19 U.S. states and Canada; we're opening more all the time. Our unique property-ownership model makes us a different sort of retailer because we buy and develop most of our buildings and land. We have developed more than 600 retail strip centers and count Fortune 500 companies as well as Mom and Pop retailers amongst our tenants."

    Eight of those 775 stores are within 25 miles of my house. (There are 50 Redbox locations within 12 miles.)
     
  11. Orion9

    Orion9 Legend

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    Agreed. I haven't been to a video rental store since buying a TiVo in 1999. There is always 20 to 40 hours of stuff on the DVR leaving little reason to spend time and money at a video store. This seems to be a common story among DVR owners.

    I noticed many (nearly all) video stores disappearing over the last 14 years. Blockbuster has held on longer than most as there is still at least one that I occasionally pass by.
     
  12. CCarncross

    CCarncross Hall Of Fame

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    I've yet to see streaming video on par with a BD disk....it shows 1080p on the SUperHD stuff from Netflix, but put in the BD and it aint the same. I am picky about the PQ, and I just dont enjoy it as much if I know it doesnt look as good as it should. I also have taken to only going to IMAX for 3D or 4K for others if I go out to the theater.
     
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  13. fredp

    fredp Legend

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    Until this thread on Sat Guys and here I never heard of them.... A quick look at their site shows the nearest store to me some 200 miles away.... Yeah sure this is a thriving growing business... Redbox around here can be found in all the supermarkets, box stores(ie,;Walmart) and even some gas stations.
     
  14. Orion9

    Orion9 Legend

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    Family Video access depends on where you live, because their site shows no stores in my state or in the immediately adjacent states, and their search based on distance only goes to 200 miles, which isn't enough to find one.

    On the other hand, my parents live in a tiny midwest town with a single traffic light (that just blinks most of the time) and they have one.
     
  15. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    They are definitely a regional company ... but they are still the largest and still adding stores while Blockbuster ceases to be a store. Perhaps growing with their means to support their operations is a good thing? Many companies grow faster than they can support - going deep into debt to finance new store locations. When the debt catches up with them they have to close stores (at a loss) and some times lose the entire company. Family Video has managed to work within the resources that they have.

    Redbox has grown through low overhead location rentals ... limited staff (a small team supports many locations). 35000 locations (Sept 2013) with 68% of the American population within a 5 minute drive of their nearest location (2011). 66 million rentals per month (3Q 2013). There is obviously a demand for physical media.
    (Numbers in above paragraph from Redbox.com.)

    Blockbuster was bankrupt before DISH got them and I do not believe DISH ever wanted the storefronts. They wanted the library and distribution agreements. I'm not sure the name does them any good.
     
  16. tsmacro

    tsmacro Hall Of Fame

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    Plus of course another thing about their business model is they do buy the property their stores are on. So for example where I live there's one in the town next to mine where they lease out part of their building to a Little Cesar's pizza, so they aren't just relying on the video rental business to make money.
     
  17. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Selling 2 liter bottles of pop and microwave popcorn in a video store has come a long way. "Dinner and a movie" in one stop is a good thing ... and perhaps people will pick up the movie while they stop for dinner as much as they pick up a pizza when they come for a movie.
     
  18. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Leapin' Lizard Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I never thought of this before... but your post made me think.

    I wonder if Blockbuster (before they went bankrupt) could have partnered with something like a pizza place or chinese place or other take-out restaurant... split the rent on the building AND provided a one-stop shop for bringing home dinner and a movie? People stopping to get food might rent a movie... people stopping to rent a movie might get food... seems like an idea with "win" written all over it a couple of years ago.
     
  19. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I seem to remember the initial locations for Redbox were primarily McDonald's restaurants. They have now expanded to all sorts of retail locations (food stores and drug stores are common in my area, with one in a non-super Walmart). The dinner part could be anything one could buy in a grocery store - but they have made sure that they are convenient.
     
  20. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    The overhead for the all the Blockbusters I've ever seen was pretty high. Both a lot of square footage, and a lot of staff. And they seemed cold and rigid. The Red Boxes I've seen were just vending machines, and I bet Family Video stores are closer to the Red Box operation than BB.

    Didn't the company also get some real unfavorable publicity over some issues or other?
     

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