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Blu-ray downloads

Discussion in 'IPTV and Internet Video Delivery' started by Steve H, Nov 16, 2009.

  1. Steve H

    Steve H Icon

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    I hope this fits in this forum. Is it possible to download Blu-ray movies via the internet using Netflix or BlockBuster? I was told this weekend that only SD versions can be sent via the net.
     
  2. Fontano

    Fontano Godfather

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    Downloading a Blu-Ray movie via the internet, no, not possible it would take a very long time on even the fastest of connections.

    Watching an HD version of the movie, Netflix does have some HD available for it's streaming services. It is magnitudes smaller then the SD offerings, but it is available.

    Not sure about Blockbuster.
     
  3. Steve H

    Steve H Icon

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    May 15, 2006
    I misstated my question. Are Blu-ray movies available via "streaming" not "downloads?
     
  4. Fontano

    Fontano Godfather

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    Again, no.

    HD movies are available, but "Blu-Ray", no.

    Blu-Ray level content is way to large to stream over the internet, practically.
     
  5. Steve H

    Steve H Icon

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    May 15, 2006
    thanks for the help
     
  6. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    I wouldn't say "to large": for streaming a size doesn't matter.

    Perhaps you mean bit-rate level of BR movies is too high ( up to 40...50 Mbps) for streaming via Internet.
     
  7. Fontano

    Fontano Godfather

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    Yes, the bit-rate, makes the data size much larger, that makes internet streaming impractical for almost all residential broadband connections.
     
  8. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    W.Mdtrn Sea
    Since it's real-time streaming, the size is irrelevant; only bandwidth is matter for it.
     
  9. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    Nov 13, 2007
    Blu-Rays can sustain 40 Mb/s and have peaks of nearly 50 Mb/s.

    A T1 line can only transfer 1.5 Mb/s (though uploads are just as fast), and super-high-speed fiber connections typically max out at 10 Mb/s continuous, with short bursts up to 20 Mb/s. On the low end, a cheap $20/month DSL connection is usually only 256 kb/s, or 0.25 Mb/s, for downloading, max.

    And the movie portion of a Blu-Ray disc typically runs from 20-35 GB in size. That's a HUGE amount of data to transfer.

    Finally, there's the copyright issues, and the fact that most Blu-Rays are not in the public domain, so it is against federal law to copy them, or even to break the encryption used to protect them.
     
  10. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Doctor Whom Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I know I've seen some 720p HD (iTunes) for download... but it's not at a high bitrate either. I don't recall ever seeing any high bitrate HD even at 720p available for streaming.
     
  11. jeffshoaf

    jeffshoaf Icon

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    NetFlix streams 720p to the Roku and other devices and is supposed to be working on 1080i; not quite BluRay though. And I'm a bit short of bandwidth on my DSL connection. It supposedly works very well on a 5MB or better connection.
     
  12. DrPhyzx

    DrPhyzx New Member

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    T1? What year are you living in, 1994? Nobody thinks in those terms anymore... it's irrelevant since nobody uses T1 for anything anymore. Anything that was T1 15 years ago is fiber now.

    $20/month DSL is usually at least 768 kb/s (e.g. att/yahoo dsl) and $40/month gets you 6Mb/s. I regularly test out at about 6.5 Mb/sec and my service costs less than $40/month. As for fiber optic, again... not sure what planet you are on but Verizon FIOS offers 50Mb/s and the theoretical limit is well above 1Gb/sec with standard, currently available technology for last mile delivery

    If there was demand, we could all have service fast enough for streaming blu-ray right now. However, the demand isn't there (yet) and there are other infrastructure issues, as well. That said, Blu-ray is a sitting duck, and will sink into irrelevancy before the last nail, direct delivery of 1080, goes in the coffin.

    BTW, OP, iTunes has 720p of many shows and movies and the quality is much better (less compression) than other services that deliver 720p "HD" online.
     
  13. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    I'm well aware of what is available *in a few select areas*, but most folks I know don't have those speeds, or choose not to pay for them. Many people don't understand the difference between sending an email or browsing Amazon.com and downloading a Blu-Ray. Keep in mind that you're just over the hill from Silicon Valley (I'm from the Bay Area).

    I have 16 Mb/s service, which is the fastest offered in my area by any provider, but it's expensive at >$100/month. I'm a geek, and Internet is of huge important to me, so I pay for it, and I use it, a lot. Most people don't/won't pay for those speeds at those prices. But it would still take me a day or two to download a Blu-Ray.

    There are also 100,000 people within 20 miles of where I am right now who can't get any faster than 2 Mb/s from any provider, with most not even having 2 Mb. They won't be downloading any Blu-Rays anytime soon.
     
  14. flexoffset

    flexoffset Godfather

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    We use T-1 at work. I know several companies using T-1 lines. We have no other options besides dial-up.
    Good for you on your many internet access options.
    Not everybody has them yet.
     
  15. lwilli201

    lwilli201 Hall Of Fame

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    I have 3MB DSL and Netflix looks great on a 32" LCD 720P TV using the Roku box.
     
  16. Grentz

    Grentz New Member

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    Standard DSL is actually 768k to 1.5mb down. I pay $20/mo for 1.5/512 DSL and that is pretty standard of most providers with a bundle. I can also grab 10/1 service for $60/mo if I wanted to. Usually only extended reach DSL plans will be down in the 256k or 512k range.

    Most cable is up to 10 or 15mb down for around $50/mo. Fiber is WAY faster than 10mb....FiOS is hitting 25/15 for $70/mo and 50/20 at around $140/mo. Yes, still WAY too slow for bluray, but much faster than what you are talking about. Most still have way more bandwidth than what they need to check email and surf the web, especially many cable customers where plans start at around 5mb down :lol:

    I am talking from my experience with many customers, both in the cities and rural (I live in a very rural area). As well as just knowing most of the plans and tiers of the major ISPs.

    Fiber has the potential to do much higher quality streaming, but it is in limited areas and the plans that support the huge download speeds are typically expensive.

    T1 still is very standard in businesses for reasons besides speed (it really is not that fast at all at 1.5/1.5). T1 has many advantages for voice lines and the SLA contracts that can come along with it. Many ISPs will also support more advanced functions with only T1 lines. T3 is the bigger brother, but is VERY pricey on top of the already very pricey T1.
     
  17. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Blu-ray movies are only available on Blu-ray discs.
     
  18. Grentz

    Grentz New Member

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    Legally, at this point and time ;)

    (just pointing that out as sometimes if you search for blu-ray downloads with google and such you end up getting links to the shady illegal underworld of the internet :eek2: )
     
  19. olguy

    olguy Hall Of Fame

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    Here's the link to Amazon.com. They may not be BluRay but they are HD. Blockbuster and Netflix both offer streaming HD movies. Instant HD: Amazon Video On Demand (Movies)

    [​IMG]
     
  20. BarkingGhost

    BarkingGhost Legend

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    NE Atlanta...
    I always thought Blu-ray was a storage technology based optical media of one or more layers and a new laser.

    Movies on Blu-ray are just high-definition movies stored on the Blu-ray optical media.

    And while some of these movies may be available in HD through various providers, their catalogs are small, their Internet transport questionable, and the required access not trivial.

    For instance, MPEG-2 based HD content can run 28-30 Mbps, and using better CODECs like h.264 can bring that down to about 8-9 Mbps, the idea of maintaining that level of internet bandwidth for the duration of a movie while those packets are treated no differently than someone else's Internet traffic makes the final solicitation diluted (IMO).
     

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