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Building new home- considering D*

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by appstate, Jun 25, 2013.

  1. appstate

    appstate New Member

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    Jun 25, 2013
    Charlotte NC
    Hello-

    After years and years of TWC, I'm considering switching to DirecTV. We're building a new home- just finished framing- probably looking at late October/early November as a move in date.

    I have some buddies who really like DirecTV and I've about had it w/ TWC (well, their TV service- internet is great!).

    One of my concerns is exposed wiring. I've seen some hack jobs when it comes to satellite dish installation. Since we're building a new house, I'd like to get some opinions about when to contact DirecTV.

    I'm meeting the home audio contractor in the next two weeks to discuss speaker placement and wiring.

    Thanks!
     
  2. inkahauts

    inkahauts DIRECTV A-Team

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    Today. It's never to early. Id have started when you gad the plans drawn up myself. Your home audio people could probably run your wires for you for tv and Internet as well.

    I'd dedicate a good space as central to the house as possible to run wires from every tv phone and Internet location as well as speaker wire for a whole house audio system. And then you run lines from there to a good spot for a dish of any type and ones for an ota antenna as well as feeds for cable and phone companies. Give yourself the ability to use any possible service provider. And since wire is cheap make sure you run at least two if not three coax along with a couple Ethernet lines to ever main tv location. Also don't forget about possible ir wire runs for a hole house audio system. While wireless remotes are great preparing for the possible use of plates for audio control is also smart.

    Personally id run empty conduit from the central spot to the service entrance areas as well in case something else crops up in the future.
     
  3. carl6

    carl6 Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Nov 15, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    Not sure contacting DirecTV will accomplish much at this point. What you do want to do is review the advice you get on this web site and follow it.

    First, it is cheap to run wire during construction, so don't hesitate to run extra.

    Establish a central location in your new house where all of the video feed wiring will run to/from (and probably phone wiring, audio wiring, etc.). From this central location run two RG6 coax with solid copper center conductor (SCC) to each potential TV location in your new house. For rooms that could have the potential for rearranging from time to time, run wiring to opposite walls (2 locations per room). I would also run a Cat5e or Cat6 ethernet cable to every location you run RG6 to.

    From that central location, run FOUR RG6 coax, or empty conduit, to an outside location. Exactly where can be tricky in advance, but the goal is for this to be the feed from the dish into the central location. Someplace in the general area of where your electrical service comes in would be good, as that provides a good grounding location.

    With that wiring in place, the DirecTV installer will only need to install the dish and receivers, and do the proper cross-connecting at the central location. Quick and easy install, and no "hack job" coax running, especially to inside walls.
     
  4. appstate

    appstate New Member

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    Jun 25, 2013
    Charlotte NC
    Thanks guys! I'll be sure to talk to my home theater installer about this.

    I get what you are saying about running cable. About 8 years ago I bought my current townhouse pre construction and had the contractor prewire for my home audio... it was something like $150. No brainer.

    I should have asked is it reasonable to expect that a DirecTV install not have exposed wiring outside my home? I've noticed many times where the satellite dish is installed on the roof with wires hanging off the gutter and side of the house.

    This would be a deal-breaker for me. I'd like for the install to not have wiring exposed as much as possible.

    Is this a realist expectation?
     
  5. longrider

    longrider DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

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    Elizabeth, CO
    Yes, if you prewire as has been discussed in this thread then the only exposed wiring will be from the dish to your entry point. You can also pay an installer extra to conceal wiring but the standard free install only includes running the wire on the outside of the house. Talk to your A/V installer as most of those guys understand DirecTV enough to suggest a good dish location/wire entry point and can definitely run the cable for you.
     
  6. appstate

    appstate New Member

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    Jun 25, 2013
    Charlotte NC
    Awesome- thanks for your input!!!
     
  7. gov

    gov Legend

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    Jan 11, 2013
    Something that has come up a few times on me;

    for some reason landscapers seem to delight in putting poplar trees (or similar) in the line of sight for where I anticipate putting the satellite dish, LOL!

    Even having the home owner on board for the dish location sometimes is not enough when the landscapers want to do something dramatic on the grounds.

    Once, I was lucky and the landscaper deleted an existing tree that was a problem.


    I really like sat equipment on the backside of the structure and not visible from the front, not everyone gets lucky, but I really try.

    Had one couple that wound up turning their home 45 degrees on the lot, after they had talked to me about the prewire. That was a huge problem. I've had folks change a basement drop ceiling to drywall and not update me. Folks change wall locations, delete rooms, move closets, sometimes it doesn't matter, sometimes, OOFDA!


    Hope your new home goes well, surprises are inevitable.
     
  8. Bill Broderick

    Bill Broderick Icon

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    Long Island
    What's the tree situation going to be at your new home? If there will be no trees (or anything else) that will block a southwest view, then the dish should be able to be mounted almost anywhere you want. If that's the case you can have coax run to the location where you want the dish installed before an installer ever shows up.

    If you do have trees that my block the satellites, then you dish locations will be more limited. Take a look at Dishpointer to determine where a dish can be mounted and plan based on that. In Dishpointer, enter your new address and then Select DirecTV SL3 from the dish options (it is listed toward the bottom).
     
  9. inkahauts

    inkahauts DIRECTV A-Team

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    Also, look into comdex roof mount, as its a very clean look and really hides all wires and send them directly into the attic, assuming you have one.
     
  10. appstate

    appstate New Member

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    Jun 25, 2013
    Charlotte NC
    @Bill- I checked out Dishpointer (thanks btw!) and I have a clear LOS of SW.
    [​IMG]

    @Inkahauts- Regarding the roof mount- I do have an attic. Is it preferred to have a roof-mount dish? Should I worry about damage to the roofing and water?
     
  11. peds48

    peds48 DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

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    Roof mounts are pretty much the norm everywhere. I would not worry about it.
     
  12. inkahauts

    inkahauts DIRECTV A-Team

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    Especially with the comdex. Its made to go up like a vent pip jack in terms of sealing and such. Look into it and you will see what I'm talking about. Very very clean.
     
  13. longrider

    longrider DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

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    When you went to Dishpointer you left it at the default 91W. Change the satellite selection to 101W and the line moves significantly to the left. It looks like you will still be OK but just FYI
     
  14. peds48

    peds48 DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

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    If a Comdex is used, make sure it is install in a down pitch part of the roof so that a stubby mount can be used in conjunction, otherwise monopoles have to be used with a regular mast
     
  15. appstate

    appstate New Member

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    Jun 25, 2013
    Charlotte NC
    I think I'm liking the roof mount idea. Our house is pretty tall... a garage/basement and two stories above. Our house is a LOT taller than the neighboring house to the west.
     
  16. inkahauts

    inkahauts DIRECTV A-Team

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    Evidently I totally forgot how to spell the thing,but here's there web site with all the details. I think they sell them several places, including solid signal.

    http://www.rstcenterprises.com/commdeck/
     
  17. Bill Broderick

    Bill Broderick Icon

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    Long Island
    The nice thing about the Commdeck is that you can have the roofers install it while they are shingling the house. When DirecTV comes, they can mount the dish to the Commdeck, rather than screwing through shingles. If you want to run cables into the attic, you can do so right at the Commdeck, which would solve your "unsightly wire" concern (however, I have no idea how proper grounding would be done in this case). You just need to make sure that it's installed where a dish will definitely have line of sight,
     
  18. peds48

    peds48 DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

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    The nice thing about the Commdeck is that you can have the roofers install it while they are shingling the house. When DirecTV comes, they can mount the dish to the Commdeck, rather than screwing through shingles. If you want to run cables into the attic, you can do so right at the Commdeck, which would solve your "unsightly wire" concern (however, I have no idea how proper grounding would be done in this case). You just need to make sure that it's installed where a dish will definitely have line of sight,


    Grounding can be accomplished by running the cables to the electric meter inside the house. a cable with "messenger" must be used to bond the dish
     
  19. inkahauts

    inkahauts DIRECTV A-Team

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    I'd think a dedicated ground wire from the mount to the houses electrical ground would also suffice would it not? I hate the thought of ever running my LV cables near electrical panels much less next to electrical wire if I don't need to.
     
  20. peds48

    peds48 DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

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    I'd think a dedicated ground wire from the mount to the houses electrical ground would also suffice would it not? I hate the thought of ever running my LV cables near electrical panels much less next to electrical wire if I don't need to.


    This is done everyday. It does not necessarily needs to be right next to the electric panel, since you can run a #10 for a max of 20 feet
     

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