1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Building new home! What would be ideal setup?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by Gofastr, Dec 10, 2012.

  1. Gofastr

    Gofastr Cool Member

    70
    1
    Sep 19, 2006
    Our new home will be ready in about 10 to 12 weeks. Having 4 tvs in bedrooms and great room and kitchen, what would be the ideal setup as a new subscriber?
    With the problems I've been reading about grey screen issues with the genie what do I request?
    Would like to go with a HR24 as this receiver seems to have fewer problems.Would like the ability to watch recorded shows in any room from list.
    Suggestions appreciated.
     
  2. Supramom2000

    Supramom2000 In Loving Memory of Onyx-2/23/09

    3,800
    159
    Jun 20, 2007
    Colbert, WA
    I don't think they let you choose which DVR you get, with the exception of the HR34 Genie. The best set up would be to have ethernet available at each spot you will have a receiver at as well. Although, DTV will install a connection kit for you as well.

    For your kitchen, it might be nice to have a C31, which is a client box to you the HR34. It does not use any tuners, but does need a coax connection to the satellite. It is really small, so might work well for a kitchen area.
     
  3. lugnutathome

    lugnutathome Hall Of Fame

    3,003
    108
    Apr 13, 2009
    Woodburn, OR
    My advice is have a local low voltage electrician pull dual coax lines (one for Sat and one for Terrestrial) and Cat 6 for Ethernet into all the rooms where you would expect to have a TV OR computer. As has been stated, a kitchen area connection would be a nicety as well. I had 10 rooms set up in this home and in retrospect I should have had 14 drops done but. . .

    This way you'll also identify where the sat lines will enter the home and be able to ensure power for the SWiM power inserters, network backbone, and modem . Makes everything very serviceable going forward.

    It is likely the electricians can mount the dish as well. (mine did) Then the Direct installer only needs to align the dish, and connect up the equipment. Yes you pay for the lines but installed as built ins and not dragged through later in a hurry by an installer doing piecework.

    The Direct installer will have time to be more attentive to your questions and ensure when he leaves you are happy.

    Don "free advice, worth the price, perhaps more, perhaps not" Bolton

     
  4. Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

    9,397
    244
    Feb 12, 2009
    NY Hudson...
    A central utilities area in your basement. And unless you are positive gear in a room will never get move to another wall, have multi home runs of Ethernet & RG6 to each room.
     
  5. Gofastr

    Gofastr Cool Member

    70
    1
    Sep 19, 2006
    Thanks for the many suggestions.The low voltage guy actually has placed a panel box like cabinet in the garage area where all cables originate and return.
    He also has an 120 volt receptacle for any power needs. All data lines also go in and out of box as well.
    I had him run cable lines and sat lines to all rooms.this way I can go either way.all lines are home runs with no splicing or splitters.Trying to cover all bases while walls are open.
    Also ran 4 separate RG6 lines out to yard for HD dish.
     
  6. unixguru

    unixguru Godfather

    787
    33
    Jul 9, 2007
    These recommendations are great for the current technology. But current technology evolves.

    I'd suggest conduit wherever possible (Carlon orange raceway).

    Next time I build I'm going to use false/suspended ceiling in my entire basement with conduit from the rooms above. Note that suspended ceiling doesn't have to mean ugly industrial look; you can even get systems that are coffered wood.
     
  7. wingrider01

    wingrider01 Hall Of Fame

    1,764
    2
    Sep 9, 2005
    We I added on I ran a couple of 2 inch pvc pipes through the walls and ceiling and a 4 inch pvc pipe between the floors for cable additions all of them have pull wires in the pipes
     
  8. jclangston

    jclangston Cool Member

    143
    9
    Oct 19, 2010
    Don't forget Cat 5 or 6 to each room. Wireless is nice but I prefer hard wire for speed and security. I also terminated all Cat 5 wire in a central location so that its easy to use a router for a wired home network.
     
  9. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

    21,963
    1,013
    Nov 13, 2006
    Genie system. A least a genie server and then maybe h25 non DVR units for the other locations if you really have that much to record. The issues genie clients aren't that big and will get worked out. I would never get a HR2x again unless it was in addition to a genie. There is just no point in them when you compare the two.
     
  10. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    7,316
    38
    Jun 19, 2004
    Peachtree...
    You think and you think and you think. You go over it in your head and on paper a thousand times over and as soon as the drywall is up, you always end up second guessing the number of drops and wishing you would have done something different.
     
  11. wingrider01

    wingrider01 Hall Of Fame

    1,764
    2
    Sep 9, 2005
    on a 12 foot wall have three 8 opening plates, 4 ethernet, 2 coax, 2 for future use. Overkill I know, but would rather have overkill then under estimate. even put them in the bathroom's:)
     
  12. unixguru

    unixguru Godfather

    787
    33
    Jul 9, 2007
    Long ago I read a great suggestion on this site.

    You can run cable/conduit/boxes to places without cutting lots of holes in the sheetrock. Just attach a good magnet in the wall. You can then easily find the magnet later, open the sheetrock, and install an old-work box.
     
  13. unixguru

    unixguru Godfather

    787
    33
    Jul 9, 2007
    Ain't that the truth!

    Best solution is to get rid of sheetrock ceilings. If you can get access to the ceiling then you can get access to just about any wall.

    There are some really nice looking suspended ceiling products these days. The normal sources like Armstrong and USG have better grade white. Here are a few wood systems that I've found (no doubt pretty expensive): WoodTrac, Classic Coffers, Architectural Surfaces, ACP Evoba
     
  14. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

    21,963
    1,013
    Nov 13, 2006
    Main viewing location.. 5 coax, 2 Ethernet, 1 phone

    Secondary locations.. 3 coax, 2 Ethernet, 1 phone
     
  15. bpratt

    bpratt Godfather

    649
    6
    Nov 24, 2005
    Salt Lake...
    In the late 1990s when I finished my basement, everyone said run several coax to each room. HDTV was just beginning. Instead, I ran a 1 1/2 inch electrical conduit to every place in the house where I thought I would want a TV, Speaker or computer back to a 3 foot by 3 foot closet I constructed in the basement. I also ran 2 1 1/2 inch conduits to the attic.

    My original configuration was to have 2 ReplayTV DVRs and a HR10-250 DVR mounted in the closet with composite splitters for the ReplayTVs and a component splitter for the HR10-250. I then ran 2 composite and 1 component cable plus audio cables to every TV in my house. I also ran shielded wire for the IR extenders I used to control the ReplayTVs and HR10-250 from each TV location.

    When I replaced the ReplayTV DVRs with HR21-700s, I simply pulled the composite cable and associated audio cables out of the conduit and replaced it with HDMI cables. I now use an HDMI switch to switch to the DVR I want to watch from each TV location. Because of this setup, I have had Multi-room viewing for every DVR I own before D* even started talking about it.

    The only thing I would do differently if I was to do it again; I would run 2 inch conduit instead of 1 1/2 inch because as the conduits fill up it becomes difficult to pull additional things through them.
     
  16. akohlhaa

    akohlhaa New Member

    9
    1
    Jul 4, 2008
    I agree that electrical conduit is the way to go. I prefer parallel 1" pipes rather than the larger 1 1/4 so I could go through the 2X4 easily. The exception is a 3" PVC from the basement to the attic of a two story house with a dropped ceiling in the basement. Over the last 20 years I have changed the wiring (and plumbing) markedly as discuss above. I expect to be pulling fiber at some point in the future.
     
  17. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

    21,963
    1,013
    Nov 13, 2006
    Actually, I'd go one step further. If I could, Id have conduit everywhere, but I'd also run coax and Ethernet, at least a couple runs each to every spot plus the conduit as well. Then you have room to have those as well as more stuff in the future with ease.
     
  18. SledgeHammer

    SledgeHammer Icon

    1,791
    101
    Dec 28, 2007
    Dunno how much your builder charges or what their policy is, but when I built my home in 2002, the policy was you had to use THEIR electrician to pull wires until you own the house. It was $150 PER RUN (absurd) with bare studs. ABSURD. You could do it after you move in, but then your walls will get cut open like swiss cheese (VERY LOW WAF). You should have a single run RG6 in every room which is good enough for SWiM. Networking, you can do wireless. Not worth the money to snake CAT5. Get an 802.11ac router. Same speed or faster then 1Gbps CAT5.
     
  19. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

    21,963
    1,013
    Nov 13, 2006
    I my experience, 99%!of electricians have no business doing anything with low voltage for networking or tv connections. Your suggestions I assume are based on your situation. I can't understand how if you hired the builder you couldn't go in and do it yourself and such. Or did the builder own the place till its finished and the keys are turned over?
     
  20. unixguru

    unixguru Godfather

    787
    33
    Jul 9, 2007
    It's shocking how much electricians and plumbers get these days. Pay is better than a college degree (in engineering) and 20 years of experience. Last time I had some plumbing work done I found someone that was less absurd than most - and later I discovered that he lived in a "executive class" home (more than double the value of my average house).

    In my experience they have an electrician do low voltage because most houses have so little of it - not worth it to bring in someone else for low voltage. Likewise, the pricing is based on a low number of pulls.

    With a lot of pulls one would think they would be willing to use somebody that only does low voltage at a more reasonable price.

    If I were to build again I'd negotiate hard for this kind of thing. There are hordes of builders out there starving for business. Be reasonable or get lost.
     

Share This Page