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Cable's upcoming bandwidth problems

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Ed Campbell, Aug 15, 2007.

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  1. Ed Campbell

    Ed Campbell Hall Of Fame

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  2. Drew2k

    Drew2k New Member

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    Indeed. And here's the passage that has many of us cable broadband subscribers are worried about if we want lots of VOD from DIRECTV:

    "Rate shaping" ... I've never heard the term, but I wouldn't be surprised to see it in a "Change to Terms of Service" from my cableco a couple of months after my VOD usage starts slurping up bandwidth.
     
  3. machavez00

    machavez00 Hall Of Fame

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    Phoenix,...
    Start looking for a good DSL provider!
     
  4. RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

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    Dripping...
    ANY ISP can put in methods to throttle bandwidth, and if it isn't in an AUP now all they need to do is put out a new AUP that says that they can.
     
  5. MikeR

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  6. Meklos

    Meklos Legend in his own mind...

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    The article is right, the only way to handle it is switched IP. The node is fed by fiber, the video stream is a multicast stream that originates from the headend node, and it will be treated just like any other multicast. If someone downstream on that leg requests a channel, the datastream for that channel will head down that path to the node and onto the common segment for the neighborhood/area. If those 200 houses are only watching 42 active channels, only those 42 datastreams will be 'live' (in addition to any PPV/OnDemand/etc), which leaves lots of elbow room if the numbers work out right.

    It all depends on how many unique channels will be being watched by the average node viewers. If the total of the datastreams in use off of that node takes up less total bandwidth than constantly sending down all those channels via analog and digital (and I think the analog is going away anyway), then it gains them bandwidth on the nodal segment - which is where the problem is anyway.
     
  7. c152driver

    c152driver Legend

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    Agreed. I think this is an advantage that the DSL providers have over cable broadband providers. As a DSL customer, I have my own pipe to the DSLAM.
     
  8. Steve Mehs

    Steve Mehs Hall Of Fame

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    I really don’t think DirecTV’s VOD will cause broadband providers to restrict bandwidth usage. DirecTV isn’t even a blip on the radar screen, I mean between iTunes and Bit Torrent, ISPs have handled it pretty well. I’d be worried more about if whatever servers you download DirecTV VOD from can support real broadband speeds. iTunes is one of the only places that I can use pretty much my full 15Mb connection. Having an entire season of CSI in 90 minutes versus over 7 hours with Dead Slow Line.
     
  9. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Cable modem and DSL each have their own good points [and weak ones].
    Cable has speed over distance that DSL doesn't.
    DSL doesn't share the bandwidth to the node that cable does.
     
  10. cforrest

    cforrest Icon

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    Drew,

    You are on the Island, is FIOS available in your town yet? Might be the way to go once the VOD is rolled out IMO. I'm waiting for my condo building to be connected, then I am making the switch ASAP. Not a Cablevision fan myself.
     
  11. machavez00

    machavez00 Hall Of Fame

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    In The Phoenix area we have FTTN VDSL . It allows 7mbs down 896kbs up for the $10 less than Cox sells their 7m down, 526k up service
     
  12. 1948GG

    1948GG Icon

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    You've got it dead correct; the problem will be, when that 43rd customer wants a channel for which there isn't space in the 'local loop' for. The video equivalent of 'busy tone' one gets on voice when the capacity of the DLC (digital loop carrier concentrator) is overloaded. Most folks don't realize that their wire phone circuit rarely goes straight to the central office, but is 'concentrated' by T-Span systems to their neighborhood, usually with 48 customers 'sharing' 24 actual timeslots to the C.O. (basic SLC-96 architecture in use since the 60's) or higher 'concentration'.

    But, the idea is basically the same as the SWM (or FTM in original terms), where only the requested channel is 'streamed' down the cable to the tuner/receiver, from the huge 'pool' of channels/frequencies available from the dish. It's all very doable (even for the cablecos!), and the technology is fairly 'off the shelf'.

    The big question that still remains is, can they upgrade their feeder plant with fiber fast enough, or did they use the last few years doing it? And will they keep the 'concentration' low enough to 'never' or 'rarely' get blockage problems.
     
  13. Drew2k

    Drew2k New Member

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    I live in a condo that pays for Cablevision, so I get it as part of my common charges. I don't think we'll ever have FIOS in my condo ...
     
  14. Juggernaut

    Juggernaut AllStar

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    You and your neighbors should start requesting it.
     
  15. Drew2k

    Drew2k New Member

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    Verizon apparently is not going to run fiber to condos here. There are local pols trying to get them to treat all communities as equal, but Verizon apparently has a plan and we're not part of it.

    My condo also gets a "bulk rate discount" from Cablevision, saving approximately $30 a month for the equivalent package if we all subscribed individually. The community would never want to give up that discount ...
     
  16. cforrest

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    Drew,

    You are not in N Hills area are you? I know Verizon was having issues running fiber to each gated Condo development, since they have to get agreements with each property individually to bring fiber into the development. Also heard they did a poor job deploying to one of the condo properties, which caused the rest to slowdown bringing Verizon in. Good luck with your community, if you need contact numbers at Verizon to get the ball rolling, shoot me a PM.

    Canaan
     
  17. HDTVFanAtic

    HDTVFanAtic Banned User

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    In all due respect, that article is pretty incomplete.

    The fact is that most cables companies have analog channel from 2 to around 70....or 58 channels of possible 56 38.81Mbps 256k QAMS.

    The 70 analog channels in SD would occupy roughly 5 of those 58 QAMs....leaving 53 additional QAMs of 38.81Mbps each. That is enough to put on 106 Channels of HD in addition to what they have now at a very bitrate of roughly 18.25 Mbps each - higher than any cable HD Provider actually sends out.

    Most likely they would limit the bandwidth and instead of 106 channel, put on roughly 159 HD channels averaging 13 Mbps each.

    That's a far cry from the article's 54 Channels at 3Ghz of bandwidth the article states.

    Too bad they forgot how to do simple math.
     
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