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Can I just buy a box?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by michaelc, Feb 23, 2009.

  1. michaelc

    michaelc New Member

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    Is it possible to buy an HD DVR (if not, any kind of receiver?) without a programming contract? Our house isn't fully ready to dive straight into D*, and I'm thinking of buying a receiver so the person who will pay the monthly bill can just activate it, and thus share the costs.

    Is there any way to purchase a receiver without having a subscription contract? How much will it cost? $299? More?
     
  2. Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    The HR21Pro is a purchased/owned receiver.

    http://www.solidsignal.com/prod_display.asp?PROD=HR21PRO

    Beyond that you would have to talk to DirecTV and find out what they will do for you.

    CAUTION: If you purchase a receiver from a private party, verify with DirecTV that it is an owned receiver. Don't take their word for it.

    BTW, Welcome to DBSTalk. :welcome_s

    Mike
     
  3. Doug Brott

    Doug Brott Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    Honestly, your best bet will be to wait until everything is ready and then get the receiver. You'll probably save yourself from a few headaches ..
     
  4. cweave02

    cweave02 W4SKO

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    They have them at Best Buy.
     
  5. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    DIRECTV equipment acquired at BB is leased and requires that you commit to at least 18 months of qualifying DIRECTV programming (24 months for DVR and/or HD).


    The key here is that without DIRECTV programming, each and every one of DIRECTV's current receivers and/or DVRs is USELESS. Setting yourself up to buy the hardware and having the other person back out is an arguably dangerous situation.

    There is little point in buying something that you cannot use. Further, under the new lease plans the only remotely valid reason to own is if there is a substantial property tax advantage to doing so.
     
  6. Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    All right, I can't help myself...What tax advantage?

    Mike
     
  7. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Some jurisdictions charge property taxes on consumer electronics gear. Some of these jurisdictions assess a lesser fee for owned equipment than they do for leased equipment.

    You really do have to go really far out on a very thin limb to justify purchasing.

    Don't ask me, I'm from Oregon where we don't have a sales tax nor a tax on "inventory".
     
  8. Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Well ok then. I've never head of such a thing. :grin:

    To the OP, other then the HR21Pro, it's very, very difficult to get an owned receiver and a lease will come with a two year commitment.

    Mike
     
  9. michaelc

    michaelc New Member

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    Feb 23, 2009
    This is the principle behind subsidizing of new cell phones as well, but some people pay extra to buy handsets without a service contract. I wasn't sure if any such thing existed for D*. I just want the flexibility to come and go as I please. More people will too, as the economy falls apart and people aren't sure if they will remain employed long enough that they can afford $50+ a month for television for two years (at least the phone is generally considered a necessity, television is not.)

    And yes, I know how D* boxes are useless without an authorized card. I was a customer for nearly a decade until I dropped them for cable. Then I moved, and the local cable ain't so great.
     
  10. peano

    peano Icon

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    Am I reading the OP wrong in that he wants to share an account?
     
  11. michaelc

    michaelc New Member

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    Feb 23, 2009
    I'm not sure what that means. We're two people sharing a house at the same address. It's no different than someone's spouse or girlfriend wanting to watch. I don't think anyone is "stealing television" so long as they live at the same location and agree to both watch, right?

    One of us, obviously, has to pay the monthly bill. To make it less expensive, I was hoping to pay for the setup and equipment costs.

    Just like any other subscription, one person has to pay for the location's utility, or internet, or what have you. Same thing applies here.
     
  12. peano

    peano Icon

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    Look for an H20 or HR20 on ebay that is owned - not leased. Get the RID number from the seller and confirm with Directv it is owned. You will have to pay for a new access card.
     
  13. Tom Robertson

    Tom Robertson Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    The easiest, most economical way is to split the first bill. Least costly way to start and gives you a chance to split the upfront costs however you want.

    Good luck and have fun,
    Tom
     
  14. michaelc

    michaelc New Member

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    Thanks, guys. I'm not trying to do anything nefarious here, just avoid a situation if I lose my income six months into a two year contract.
     
  15. Tom Robertson

    Tom Robertson Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    No worries, we understand.

    And sharing is good (within the same address as you've already made clear.) :)

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  16. RobertE

    RobertE New Member

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    There is another alternative.

    You could set yourself up with a commerical account.

    All boxes are owned. No commitment.

    Downsides are a somewhat different programming mix with different month costs. You will also need to setup a "buisness" and do some paperwork to get setup. Of course you have to buy the boxes.
     
  17. Justin23

    Justin23 Hall Of Fame

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    Not true. Commercial accounts have a 12 month commitment. DIRECTV for Business accounts in Residences are allowed. However, they will only be installed where the business takes place (waiting room, office). The better deal is for Residential accounts by far.

    J
     
  18. roadrunner1782

    roadrunner1782 Icon

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    I would just call D* and purchase the boxes you want but understand they come at a price! The HD DVR I purchased was $499!!!! A DVR or HD box is $399 and standard boxes are $169.
     
  19. RobertE

    RobertE New Member

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    My bad, there is a 12 month commitment.

    But it is an alternative to doing a residential account.
     
  20. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    If you factor in the additional cost to own a receiver and avoid a committment, you will find the break even point (versus paying the early termination fee) is well short of the 2 year committment. For example, if you get only one HD DVR and pay $199, then terminate after 12 months, your penalty is $240 ($20 times 12), and your total cost is $199 + $240 = $439. If you pay $499 for an HD DVR and have no committment, and terminate after 12 months, you have paid $499. Leasing would have saved you $60. You might argue "but I can sell the unit and recover some or all of my cost". Maybe. Maybe not. That depends on the evolution of technology, the price you ask versus what it costs someone to lease a unit, etc. Even factoring in some amount of recovery, at most points in the term of service you would break even or come out ahead by leasing versus buying.
     

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