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Can I split my HDMI output on my HR-20 to feed 2 HDTVs?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by MikeekiM, Aug 1, 2007.

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  1. Aug 1, 2007 #1 of 20
    MikeekiM

    MikeekiM Godfather

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    I want to feed a local television 2-3 feet away from my HR-20, as well as a remote TV in my bedroom about 15 feet away...

    Has anyone successfully done this? Do I need an amplified solution (which is quite expensive), or can I run a passive splitter (which runs under 20 bucks)?

    Note: Just to avoid confusion, I also posted another thread on feeding an SDTV... Both of these are valid and open questions for me... even though they may seem in conflict... Please provide answers independent of the other thread... Thanks!
     
  2. Aug 1, 2007 #2 of 20
    cygnusloop

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    I know of no way to split an HDMI signal (such as a passive splitter). I am sure that there are active devices out there, perhaps even some built in to newer A/V receivers. I don't really know about that.

    I would solve the problem by using the HDMI output to run the remote HDTV, and using the component plus optical to run the local HDTV. Dollars to donuts you won't be able to see a lick of difference in picture quality between HDMI and component, but that has been argued to death in many, many threads...
     
  3. Aug 1, 2007 #3 of 20
    Tom Robertson

    Tom Robertson Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    The big issue with the passive splitter is that HDMI wants to be a bi-directional communication path. Both TVs will want to try to tell the HR20 what resolutions it supports. And then their is the copy protection protocol.

    But, some have reported that a splitter can work. And with good cables, the distance should not be a problem.

    Good luck,
    Tom
     
  4. Aug 1, 2007 #4 of 20
    hilmar2k

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  5. Aug 1, 2007 #5 of 20
    AlbertZeroK

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    Just be careful. HDMI selector switches are sometimes known to have issues with the HDMI bi-directional communications. Make sure if you spend lots of money that you buy from someone with a good return policy incase it doesn't work.

    If you are running long distances, you are likely better off with HDMI as it's completely digital, but I've run component pretty far with decent results too so YMMV.
     
  6. Aug 1, 2007 #6 of 20
    bakers12

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    They have got *really* low prices on HDMI cables and they offer USPS shipping, which is also inexpensive. I'll have to look them over to see what I might order from them in the future.
     
  7. Aug 1, 2007 #7 of 20
    Ken S

    Ken S RIP

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    www.cablewholesale.com is another good source. I learned about them from a website that tested their cables against cables from companies that were selling for 10x as much (Monster). They tested out every bit as good at the much higher-priced competition.
    Delivery was fast and accurate as well.
     
  8. Aug 1, 2007 #8 of 20
    MikeekiM

    MikeekiM Godfather

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    Thanks for the replies all!

    I am not well educated as it relates to the idiosyncrasies of HDMI, so I really appreciate your knowledge here...

    So if HDMI requires a two-way handshake, will a splitter work at all? I assume if there's a box out there, that they've figured it out...and the Monoprice unit link shows a pretty high user rating... Does anyone have first hand experience with this box? I have heard some issues where both displays must be on to establish a proper "handshake"... But I have also seen in the monoprice user reviews that a user was able to use it for 2 displays...together, and separately...

    And what sort of problems could I run into with the copy protection protocal? Again, very little knowledge here... Is this akin to Macrovision copy protection? Or something different all together?

    BTW, I agree with the comment that there's little noticeable difference between 1080i and 1080p... Not to my eyes anyway... In a side-by-side A-B comparison perhaps...but when watching a single display without an immediate comparison, I cannot tell a difference...
     
  9. Aug 1, 2007 #9 of 20
    Tom Robertson

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    Another avenue to consider, especially if the two TVs are close and they both support the same resolution is to use HDMI with one and component with the other.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  10. msmith198025

    msmith198025 Member of the Year

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    Bingo!
     
  11. MrKlaatu

    MrKlaatu Godfather

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    Would going from HR20 to an AV receiver first help the handshake problem?
     
  12. cygnusloop

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    See post #2 ;) . I would recommend using component/optical for the local HDTV, and HDMI for the remote HDTV. That way you will only need to run a single cable to the remote TV.
     
  13. Tom Robertson

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    That's what I get for (not) reading your post at way too late at nite. And not only did you say it sooner, but also better.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  14. cygnusloop

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    I think we might have a small bit of misunderstanding brewing here, correct me if I am wrong...

    The comparison between HDMI/component is not 1080i/1080p. While HDMI is capable of carrying 1080p the only source for 1080p that I am aware of is Blu-Ray or HD-DVD. Component is also capable of 1080p, but these players don't allow for 1080p output over an analog output for copy protection reasons. Hollywood won't allow it.

    The HR20 will output the same resolution over component that it is outputting over HDMI, be it 480i/p, 720p, or 1080i. The HR20 does not output 1080p.

    Are we on the same page, Mike?
     
  15. hilmar2k

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    As I see it, there are two major bennfits to HDMI over component (for non-1080p sources, like the HR20).

    1. HDMI carries the audio and video in the same cable.

    This is only useful if you either use your TV for audio, or have a receievr with HDMI switching.

    2. HDMI is digital.

    This offers a couple benefits. First, HDMI is much less susceptible to signal loss and noise due to a poor quality cable. And second, it theoretically means that the TV receives the image exactly as it is output from the source. This *should* result in slightly better PQ.

    Other than that, component is just fine.
     
  16. MikeekiM

    MikeekiM Godfather

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    Thanks for the clarification... Yes, we are on the same page...

    I was speaking theoretically because I have centralized my AV components in my living room, and will want to distribute everything (including a future HD-DVD or BlueRay) to other parts of my home...

    I already distribute my 2 SD DirecTiVos via an analog mono modulator... And now I want to distribute my HR20... In the future, it will likely expand to some 1080P source...
     
  17. joed32

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  18. hilmar2k

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  19. cal87

    cal87 AllStar

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    Gefen makes quality splitters, but a little on the expensive side. I use a ConnectGear splitter - many people seem to have good luck with these, runs about $100.
     
  20. 996911

    996911 Go Pack!

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    Tobacco...
    Here is what I have and love it!
    http://www.gefen.com/kvm/product.jsp?prod_id=2757

    It is a bit pricey but so worth it. You can have two HDMI signals in and 2 out. My master and living room have flat panels that sit on the wall virtually back-to-back. So the HD box and DVD player go into the switcher and then out to both flat panels. No res loss and works seamlessly. Oh yeah, and it is remote operated. I just placed an RF repeater on it and I was good to go!
     
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