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Can two switches/APs be linked wirelessly?

Discussion in 'Tech Talk - Gadgets, Gizmos and Technology' started by SayWhat?, Jan 7, 2014.

  1. Jan 7, 2014 #1 of 15
    SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    Curious if I can link my dLink switch to my modem via wireless.

    dLink WBR-2310, 4 port 10/100 switch/router set as AP only - router functions disabled
    Modem is a Sagemcom F@ST1704N, modem/router with a 4 port 10/100 switch and "N" wireless.

    I have wireless devices that can see and connect to both.

    Here's why I want to do this:

    I have an outdoor IP camera. Sometime last fall, I lost contact with it over the wired LAN and could only use it via wireless. This past week or so, I finally got a chance to look into the problem and found that the wired port in the camera, one port in the dLink and the LAN surge suppressor between them were all dead. Could have been lightning, not sure.

    Luckily, whatever it was stopped at the dLink and didn't get into the rest of the LAN.

    The new camera I got is wired only, no wireless. If possible, I'd like to separate the dLink that the camera is plugged in to from the rest of the LAN to keep any future surges out.
     
  2. Jan 7, 2014 #2 of 15
    dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    Sure, you can use a bridge -- Linksys WGA-600N, WET-610N, or a router with DD-wrt and set as a bridge. You may have some DHCP problems on the remote (bridge) side. If you do, set Static IPs or set the AP / Bridge in the WDS mode, particularly with multiple hops.

    If you need some greater distance, particularly outside, look at the Ubiquity NanoStations (G or N).
     
  3. Jan 7, 2014 #3 of 15
    klang

    klang Hall Of Fame

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    Since the camera has to be powered and near an outlet anyway wouldn't Powerline adapters be easier?
     
  4. Jan 7, 2014 #4 of 15
    SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    Dunno. Never tried 'em.
     
  5. Jan 7, 2014 #5 of 15
    dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    In general, powerline adapters should probably be the last resort. I have two in my house and they work for a very low data requirement for me. Not video.

    One installation of 4 hops I have is on 3 different 120 volt sources about 3/4 mile separated.
     
  6. Jan 7, 2014 #6 of 15
    klang

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    No personal experience but I have seen the powerline adapters recommended in similar situations at security camera forums.
     
  7. Jan 9, 2014 #7 of 15
  8. Jan 9, 2014 #8 of 15
    dennisj00

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    I love the way the spec avoids telling you if it's 2.4Ghz N or 5 Ghz N band.
     
  9. RasputinAXP

    RasputinAXP Kwisatz Haderach of Cordcuttery

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    Yeah, cute. 150Mbps always means 2.4GHz only though.
     
  10. wingrider01

    wingrider01 Hall Of Fame

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    so other companies make the same type of item, research them, one fact they are a lot more reliable the powerline adapters, cheaper also. I ran Cat 6 cables to my camera's, wireless is to unreliable and to slow since the cameras has 10/100/1000 Ethernet and utilize POE for power
     
  11. RasputinAXP

    RasputinAXP Kwisatz Haderach of Cordcuttery

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    I'd generally steer clear of 2.4GHz for anything anymore. I was fine on 802.11g for a while, then my neighbors started populating my area with so much crap on the same band that I couldn't get 2 floor away anymore. Swapped out for a 5GHz n setup and all of my stuff is happy again.

    If I could I'd hard wire more than I do, but I have a 30+ year old duplex.
     
  12. dennisj00

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    Download 'inSSIDer' and 'help' your neighbor set their channels correctly.
     
  13. RasputinAXP

    RasputinAXP Kwisatz Haderach of Cordcuttery

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    Sadly they secured their routers. I can't 'help' them very much.
     
  14. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    I actually meant a knock on the door or a suggestion passing in the hall rather than hack their router!
     
  15. RasputinAXP

    RasputinAXP Kwisatz Haderach of Cordcuttery

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    OH. See, I uh...yeah. I tend to ... the dimmer side of things.

    Edit: It's my housing development. Most of them are generic names. I have no idea whose is whose.
     

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