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Cannae Drive for Satellites

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Drucifer, Aug 4, 2014.

  1. Aug 4, 2014 #1 of 18
    Drucifer

    Drucifer New Member

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    NY Hudson...
    NASA Says Puzzling New Space Drive Can Generate Thrust Without Propellant

    READ WHOLE ARTICLE
     
  2. Aug 5, 2014 #2 of 18
    inkahauts

    inkahauts DIRECTV A-Team

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    Interesting. It sure would change space if that is right.
     
  3. Aug 5, 2014 #3 of 18
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    That is interesting. I wonder if it would have any earthbound applications.

    Rich
     
  4. Aug 5, 2014 #4 of 18
    boukengreen

    boukengreen Legend

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    Closer to a warp drive maybe
     
  5. Aug 5, 2014 #5 of 18
    phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    It does make one think about exciting possibilities. Right now it's as if it were the early 1700's and we are reading about the invention of the Newcomen atmospheric engine (aka steam engine) but now have to wait 60 years for a James Watt to come along and make it practical in revolutionary ways.
     
  6. Aug 5, 2014 #6 of 18
    boukengreen

    boukengreen Legend

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    lol yep is there a Zefram Cochrane born yet that we don't know about yet lol
     
  7. Aug 5, 2014 #7 of 18
    longrider

    longrider DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

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    That time frame sounds about right considering that Zefram Cochrane will invent the warp drive in 2063...

    Seriously, this just reinforces my belief that you can never say something is impossible, just impossible with our current understanding of science and technology

    Edit: Boukengreen beat me to it :)
     
  8. Aug 5, 2014 #8 of 18
    boukengreen

    boukengreen Legend

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    yep we're on the same mind frame lol
     
  9. Aug 5, 2014 #9 of 18
    yosoyellobo

    yosoyellobo Icon

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    Hopefully it will not take as long as it took to harness the power of Fusion. Oops...
     
  10. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    Particularly COLD fusion!
     
  11. yosoyellobo

    yosoyellobo Icon

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    I knew I was missing something in my post. Man this getting old sucks. :)
     
  12. Drucifer

    Drucifer New Member

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    Think our gravity would make any movement extremely small compared to weightlessness of space.
     
  13. boukengreen

    boukengreen Legend

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    I think it would take a lot to change our normal gravity even a little bit
     
  14. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    If you think outside the box, you'll find that we've defeated gravity in many ways. Airplanes are an example.

    Rich
     
  15. boukengreen

    boukengreen Legend

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    I was excluding external factors like roller coasters, planes, car wrecks. Et all
     
  16. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Hovercraft fit into that category too, as do the space shuttles and rocket ships. We just don't think of them as "anti-gravity" devices.

    Rich
     
  17. Delroy E Walleye

    Delroy E Walleye AllStar

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    I would assume the microwave energy has to come from somewhere, (either beamed to the spacecraft, solar or nuclear-generated). I don't know much about physical astro-dynamics, but the concept of energy exchange shouldn't be too hard to grasp. Only when limited to thinking of having to eject some sort of mass (conventional, or even ion drive propulsion) does this seem totally mysterious.

    However, it certainly doesn't sound like the type of propulsion that's going to get a spacecraft from the ground up into orbit all by itself! Seems to me it would most likely be used to maneuver spacecraft already in orbit (such as our beloved broadcast satellites).
     
  18. yosoyellobo

    yosoyellobo Icon

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    Once in space it could be use to travel to other planets or even other stars. If I remmenber correctly to get to Mars you would accelerate for half the distance turn the craft around and decelerate the rest of the way. Please feel free to correct any or all of this as I am going from memory from something I migth have study forty or fifty years ago. :)
     

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