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CES 2009 Slingloaded HD 922 DVR

Discussion in 'ViP922 DVR Support Forum' started by dvrblogger, Jan 8, 2009.

  1. jacmyoung

    jacmyoung Hall Of Fame

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    That does not mean they have the capacity to do the streaming, it could simply be that to achieve the kind of future streaming results, a hard drive will be needed to provide buffer capacity and storing all the content, if nothing else, to sell content for extra revenue. Can't do so without saving them some where.

    If you actaully read me correctly, and understood what the coax TV2 was about, you would have not made such connection in the first place.
     
  2. GrumpyBear

    GrumpyBear Hall Of Fame

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  3. GrumpyBear

    GrumpyBear Hall Of Fame

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    You do realize of Course that the ViP612 DOES have a harddrive and as well as Broadband. ViP211's Can have Harddrives and already have Broadband. Plus DLNA was talked about and included way back when with ViP622.
    You say it should require minimum hardware, and forget the machines left out have the hardware you say is required.
     
  4. jacmyoung

    jacmyoung Hall Of Fame

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    Do you now at least understand the TV2 coax has nothing to do with the “coax” mentioned in MoCA?

    As for 612, who knows, maybe the chip set will not be able to handle the future streaming demand?
     
  5. GrumpyBear

    GrumpyBear Hall Of Fame

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    Neither of us know, for sure about the coax connection. I haven't said it would/could be used. ViP922 may or may not even support MoCA 1.1, it just has the proper technology to support Moca 1.1, to use a Coax FEED, to broadcast a HD signal over Coax, as well as the ViP 622/722 have the dlna tech built into them as well. So until you KNOW for sure, start reading to prove one way or another.
     
  6. jacmyoung

    jacmyoung Hall Of Fame

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    I have read what MoCA is, have you?

    MoCA in its simplest form is an adaptor, on one end it connects to the coax outlet on the wall using a coax cable, on the other end it connects to the receiver’s Ethernet port using a CAT5 cable, or whatever a paired cable, but not coax cable.

    Now tell me where in that above picture the TV2 coax output comes in?
     
  7. GrumpyBear

    GrumpyBear Hall Of Fame

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    Ok, Please go back and read what you thought you read. I am trusting you are not trying to be obtuse, that you are really not understanding, MultiMedia over Coax Alliance and there current very open standard 1.1

    Granted some of us remember the good ol days of having to run, coax cable 10base2 thin net, t-connectors, and proper termination, as that was the ONLY way to run Ethernet, Cat3 and Cat5 10base-T weren't even on the horizon. Oh and how about upgrading those good all ArcNet, or even having to install ArcNet, did I need a passive hub, or active hub, Hey Dan, what did you install over there? Double check those dip switchs while you are at it too. Oh and the good ol He/she Token Ring connectors(token Ring pissed me off then, like Kerbose Security does today). Oh real quick, anybody remember what thick ethernet was called? 10base5? those good ol Vampire taps so you could switch back over. My head hurts, my back hurts, and I can't find my snips.
    Man have we come a LONG way.
     
  8. DustoMan

    DustoMan Godfather

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    Here's a list of channels and what resolution they broadcast:
    http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=164671
     
  9. jacmyoung

    jacmyoung Hall Of Fame

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    I know, I understand why you thought the fact the 922/722/622 have a TV2 output in the form of a coax terminal might have had something to do with them been possible MoCA candidates, but you are wrong. There is no such connection.
     
  10. jacmyoung

    jacmyoung Hall Of Fame

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    I will look into it, thank you.

    Oh no, I have seen that list, it has nothing to do with the content the networks or Netflix/Hulu put up on their websites. The shows they put up on their websites for your live streaming are severely downrezzed from their HD origin.
     
  11. GrumpyBear

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    From the guy who thinks MoCA means to connect coax to utp. I will continue to check things out.
     
  12. DustoMan

    DustoMan Godfather

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    Okay. That makes more sense. I was wondering why you were bringing up your DirecTV box if you were asking about resolutions on sites.

    ABC.com it's 720p.
    Netflix is 720p.
    Not sure about Hulu, but I'm pretty sure their streaming HD content is 720p. I'm not familiar with others.
     
  13. HobbyTalk

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  14. jacmyoung

    jacmyoung Hall Of Fame

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    What I was trying to say was, and if you look at HobbyTalk's point too, the shows we can stream from ABC.com, Hulu and some others cannot be in true 720p HD format, if they are, you will not be able to watch them at the maximum 2.5mbps rate. They have to be first downrezzed before uploaded to their sites for your entertainment.
     
  15. Daniel

    Daniel AllStar

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    Feb 6, 2007
    OK, one thing that isn't clear to me. Will the 922 support all of the online video sources like Hulu and YouTube. And will it support Netflix downloads?

    If both of those are true, I may just have to dump DirecTV.
     
  16. DustoMan

    DustoMan Godfather

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    There you go saying "true 720p HD format." What does that even mean? Are you talking about the amount of compression? Because every video signal is compressed to a certain degree... some better then others.
     
  17. DustoMan

    DustoMan Godfather

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    I went and looked it up on Netflix's blog. Their HD streams are VC-1 AP streams @ either 2.6 or 3.4 Mbps.

    http://blog.netflix.com/2008/11/encoding-for-streaming.html
     
  18. jacmyoung

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    Very good point, I was not accurate, should have said not only are they downrezzed but reformated to be something much less, for example, from 1280x720p to 640x360p, just to throw out a number, not mean it to be the right format.
     
  19. HobbyTalk

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    That is not correct. Programming can be in 720p form and be streamed at 2.5M. The HD specs have NO specs in it on bandwidth. From my above link:

    ABC encodes its content in 12 different profiles ranging from 164 kbps at 240 x 136 resolution up to 2000 kbps at 1280 x 720 and 24 frames-per-second

    That format is valid 720p HD.
     
  20. SaltiDawg

    SaltiDawg New Member

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    I understand and agree with everything you said here, except I don't understand the 24 fps part. Are you saying that ABC broadcasts at 24 fps?
     

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