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Charlie Ergen on wireless dreams, ad skipping, à la carte programming and more

Discussion in 'General DISH™ Discussion' started by sat01, Feb 12, 2013.

  1. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Northern...
    Streaming, indeed, represents the best model for a la carte, giving you complete control over your programming right down to each individual show.

    Remember, we even have a "sister-forum" IPTVConnection.com created by Chris Blount.

    The kind of a la carte people want here could extend the life of the traditional TV model, but successful capitalism is now measured in how much money you made in the last 30 seconds, not whether your company will survive more than five years.

    All those niche channels would be better placed on the web. They won't make it in the long run because they extract a few cents a month from each of us. That just makes them lazy and it favors the big guys like NBCU anyway as they diddle with rebranding unsuccessful cable channels.
     
  2. skyboysea

    skyboysea Icon

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    Advertisers might pay the bill but the money comes from our pocket. The cost of tv is embedded in any product you buy no matter if you watch cable/broadcast tv or not, watch ads or not, or have cut the cord.

    Personally I believe in prices being transparent so I much rather pay for a show I watch, knowing how much I spend on it, than paying for it through program packages that hide the real cost of channels and advertising that hide the cost in the price of goods.
     
  3. skyboysea

    skyboysea Icon

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    Streaming is the technology used to deliver content. A-la-carte is a method to pay for the content. So, no, they are not the same.

    If Netflix has exclusive content from, say, CBS, to access that content I have to subscribe to Netflix service. It is no different than subscribing to a given package just because it gives you access to a certain channel.

    If you use other services like Amazon and Vudu you can access single episodes or seasons of any show they have available. So that's a-la-carte.

    If the streaming providers will move to a Netflix model, we are going to repeat the current cable/sat model on the internet. Different medium, still same product. How things will evolve will depend on the big media companies. They can set the price and make content available or not so they maximize their income at the end choosing how the market will work.
     
  4. Hoosier205

    Hoosier205 Active Member

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    Again, a la carte is the ability to subscribe to individual channels of your choice. Streaming is not a la carte.
     
  5. RasputinAXP

    RasputinAXP Kwisatz Haderach of Cordcuttery

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    Go away.
     
  6. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    narrow minded people ... :( they are live in own small world with little of freedom and feel they should command others same way ...
     
  7. TheRatPatrol

    TheRatPatrol Hall Of Fame

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    So one day instead of having channels we'll just have shows?
     
  8. Curtis0620

    Curtis0620 Hall Of Fame

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    And pay more to get less.
     
  9. domingos35

    domingos35 Icon

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    directv's subs just can't stay away from dish's threads can't they?
     
  10. Curtis0620

    Curtis0620 Hall Of Fame

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    It's a discussion about ala carte.
     
  11. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    The...
    Just symantics or verbal shorthand -- the full statement would be like, "video content of one's choice delivered via internet streaming, at a time and place of one's choice, is a la carte".

    IOW, streaming is a la carte

    Oh, BTW, forget "channels", a la carte is all about 'content'.
     
  12. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Northern...
    To quote Charlie (emphasis added):
     
  13. Hoosier205

    Hoosier205 Active Member

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    No, it isn't semantics. Streaming and a la carte are very different animals.
     
  14. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    "À la carte" is a French term referencing a menu of items priced and ordered separately, i.e. the usual operation of restaurants. (In contrast to a table d'hôte, at which a menu with limited or no choice is served at a fixed price.)

    As Charlie noted (quoted in my last post), "the Internet is à la carte." He is saying that in the context of Netflix and Amazon and that is because you can select from a vast menu and stream whatever you select - sometimes you have to pay and sometimes you have to watch ads and sometimes you get it without a price. Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, YouTube, etc., are comparable to channels as are the network websites.

    What Charlie (and Nick) are saying is that you can already pick your channel, say from the choice of the Netflix, Amazon, and Hulu channels. Except you can even pick what show you want whenever you want it.

    For many Americans, cable providers because they are also the ISP, essentially provide access to an à la carte alternative. And the show streams into the home over the same cable as CBS and USA and HBO. That's something Charlie's Dish Network cannot do for subscribers who are not connected to the internet via a high speed connection.

    You can, and many do, pay a monthly subscriber fee directly to Netflix, Amazon, and/or Hulu. Netflix is offering original programming just like FX.

    I don't see how anything could more à la carte than what's offered streaming over the internet.
     
  15. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    People forget that Netflix is only as cheap as it is because most of their content is funded from other sources... IF enough people ditch cable/satellite in favor of Netflix, than you can bet Netflix will either raise their prices OR come up with tiers of their own that require different payments to access different groups of movies/shows.

    Somehow people think all the exact same movie/show content would be produced if people paid only $8 per month for access to all of it.... Maybe your cable/satellite bill is high, but no way it ever approaches being that low.

    Case in point...

    Many Blu-ray movies come with a "free" digital copy... but if you want that digital copy without making the Blu-ray purchase, you have to pay half or more what that Blu-ray costs for an SD copy, almost as much as a Blu-ray for an HD digital copy.
     
  16. skyboysea

    skyboysea Icon

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    Comparing the $8 Netflix charges with the cable/sat bill is not correct. You pay Netflix for the content but pay cable/sat for content+delivery. The real cost of Netflix is $8+$30-40 for the broadband connection you need to use the service.
     
  17. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    So how much of the DISH subscription is delivery and how much is content?
     
  18. sregener

    sregener Godfather

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    I think the concept of a "channel" is where we're in a different boat. In essence, you don't watch channels, you watch programs. The customer's demand for a la carte is based on the "if I don't watch it, I shouldn't have to pay for it" argument. So why would you cling to the old idea of paying for an entire channel when you might only watch it for 2-3 hours a week? "Channels" are essentially programming bundles, and a la carte is all about unbundling content.

    On the other hand, I was a bit sloppy with my writing, and there are streaming "services" like Hulu+ and Netflix and Amazon Prime that you pay a monthly fee for, and they were not what I had in mind when I said "streaming." I was thinking more like Amazon Instant Video, Vudu, or iTunes, where there is no monthly fee and you simply pay for the programs you want to watch. So take my original post and replace "streaming" with "on demand streaming." Sorry for not being more clear.
     
  19. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    And how much of your monthly broadband bill do you break out for video vs. all other web use?
     
  20. skyboysea

    skyboysea Icon

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    Wish I would know. That would be a first step toward more transparent bills.

    Probably it is neither Dish nor content providers interest to divulge that information. If we don't know they can blame each other for the rising bills.
     

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