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Coax Cable better than antenna?

Discussion in 'Local Reception' started by kevinturcotte, Apr 6, 2012.

  1. Apr 6, 2012 #1 of 10
    kevinturcotte

    kevinturcotte Active Member

    3,957
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    Dec 19, 2006
    Outside...
    When I got my AM21N, I just connected a piece of coax cable to it, cut the end off and stripped the cable, and stuck it out the window. I was getting pretty good signal on the 2 main stations I want. Channel 8 was 7-85, and 6 (44) was 79-85, while 13 (38) was getting 61-64 (Don't really need this station, but if I get it, it's an added bonus). I figured I'd up the signal some, and increase stability with an antenna, so I got the Winegard FreeVision FV-HD30 http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp?p=FV-HD30&d=Winegard-FreeVision-FV-HD30-Compact-Ultra-Powerful-DTV-TV-Antenna-Free-Vision-%28FV-HD30-FV-30BB%29-. Just placed it outside, and connected it to the AM21N, and I'm actually getting LOWER signal than the plain coax cable! 8 and 6 (44) were in the low-mid 60's, and 13 (38) was in the low 50's! It was a temp mount, but I wasn't anywhere near the antenna while checking signals. Is coax really that good, or is the antenna just that bad?
     
  2. Apr 6, 2012 #2 of 10
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    I wouldn't blame the antenna. Perhaps your coax 'rod' antenna is getting syn-phase reflection from a wall.
    You should put the antenna higher as possible to get best results.
    Use antennaweb, rabbitear sites for define what you need for desired stations.
     
  3. Apr 6, 2012 #3 of 10
    kevinturcotte

    kevinturcotte Active Member

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    Dec 19, 2006
    Outside...
    The antenna is in the same exact spot as the coax cable, so I would THINK that would work as a side-by-side comparison?
     
  4. Apr 6, 2012 #4 of 10
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    Depend... check directions, signals by these web sites' charts.
     
  5. Apr 8, 2012 #5 of 10
    kenglish

    kenglish Icon

    973
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    Oct 2, 2004
    Salt Lake...
    Is the antenna pointed correctly?
    It will be very directional (ideally, to eliminate multi-path interference), and the simple coax will not. So, the antenna might be pointed in a direction that gives you multi-path.
    The numbers don't correlate to signal strength, usually. They are an indication of the "quality" of the received signal, as it relates to multi-path.
     
  6. Apr 8, 2012 #6 of 10
    kevinturcotte

    kevinturcotte Active Member

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    Outside...
    It's pointing in the direction of the two broadcasting towers.
     
  7. Apr 8, 2012 #7 of 10
    Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    Sep 16, 2006
    UHF band has dead spots. Sometimes moving the antenna 6 inches up/down or left/right will dramatically change the signal levels. Without a rotor, you just need to move it around, and change directions in 5 degree increments until you find the results you want.

    It is very difficult to explain antenna/wire oddities when you are close to the ground or metal objects which can reflect signals around.
     
  8. Apr 8, 2012 #8 of 10
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    Seems to me, kevinturcotte is more interesting in explanation than getting better signal. :)
     
  9. Apr 8, 2012 #9 of 10
    kevinturcotte

    kevinturcotte Active Member

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    Dec 19, 2006
    Outside...
    I'll try it. I've got new cabling showing up Tuesday, so I'll try it then. Move it around a bit.
     
  10. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    Not "a bit" - you'll need install the antenna high as possible and try to keep LOS clear off trees and buildings.
     

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