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Comcast ISP - blocking traffic

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by thumperr, Oct 19, 2007.

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  1. tuff bob

    tuff bob Icon

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    Mar 4, 2007
    You could argue that DirecTV provides an unlimited television service, but does not let you exercise it ;)
     
  2. tiger2005

    tiger2005 Godfather

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    Sep 22, 2006
    Its called DLB. :D
     
  3. tuff bob

    tuff bob Icon

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    Mar 4, 2007
    :lol:

    the point being DirecTV says they have X channels, but does not let you have enough receivers that you can watch them all at the same time :lol:
     
  4. CJTE

    CJTE Hall Of Fame

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    Sep 17, 2007
    Theres actually ONE way to do it.
    You have to setup the VPN on your computer, then share the connection (set it up as a DHCP server in a seperate range as your router [like, if you're router is broadcasting 192.168.*.*, I would set it up as 172.16.*.*]), then set your HR20 with a static address in the range you've set on your machine, then your HR20 will tunnel through your computer, which is tunneling through the VPN
     
  5. Ken S

    Ken S RIP

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    Feb 12, 2007
    limit,

    A bit off topic, but that case revolves around the difference between a private and public performance. Those kind of cases have been around for years. Put a radio on your phone's "On Hold" system and eventually you'll get a call from a licensing agency.
    I was talking about a "private" performance...but was mostly just tossing an analogy out there to show that DirecTV engages in the same type of vague contract language.
     
  6. Ken S

    Ken S RIP

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    Feb 12, 2007
    oakwcj,

    It's worse...because when you do catch them in breach they'll immediately settle for big bucks but demand non-disclosure agreements. They figure it's cheaper to pay off the few that complain loud enough while collecting from the rest that don't.
     
  7. jjohns

    jjohns Godfather

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    Sep 15, 2007

    Man. . .you've really got it bad.
    Even shouting Comcast.
     
  8. wavemaster

    wavemaster Godfather

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    Sep 15, 2007
    Limited, unlimited, at the point of connection that is all BS. You pay for a pipe with "X" amount of pipe 1,4,6,10mb/sec. That is the limit.

    A 1mb/sec connection is about 250GB/mo. So they can sell me a 1mb/sec connection UNLIMITED and the pipe would dictate what the actual limit would be.

    So the provider ABSOLUTELY CAN provide you unlimited bandwidth based on the connection you have. So this "there is no such thing", "it's physics" etc. is all BS. They can provide unlimited service based on the speed you contract for.

    That is my rub on all this. I PAY for a 6MB connection, is it to much to ask for that to be delivered?

    I run a web hosting company and collectively between our facilities we have a 300mb/sec. contract billed at the 95th percentile. All on fiber pipes and we pay accordingly. It's not 300 on Monday, or the second week of the month, it's 300 up and down 24/7. We average 220-260mb/sec during the non-holiday months and will burst well beyond 600/sec for the holiday shopping season. With a yearly average of 290mb/sec. That is about 70-80 TB's/mo. Thank God they don't play this throttling game in the business world or we would be out of business.
     
  9. jutley

    jutley Godfather

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    Oct 11, 2006
    The best I can do for an ISP in my area is a wireless connection. The ISP I have been with for 2 years was just bought out. The new company is changing the ToS and doing just as you describe. They advertise that their 5 mb/s connection is restricted to 12GB per month. Yeah, you heard it right, 12GB. When I called to get clarification or find out if I could pay for a higher cap they explained the rule. They allow 350MB per day at the 5 mb/s speed and then they throttle you back to 2.5 mb/s when you hit 350MB during a 24 hour period. They allow the customer access to their monitoring so you can see in almost real time where you are for the day. I don't like it, but at least they are honest about what they are doing.
     
  10. Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    Nov 15, 2005
    Umm...

    COMCAST's branding, is their name in a single case...
    Like DirecTV used the last two letter's in caps.

    So while it wouldn't be "proper" to put... comcast
    Generally you se it referred to as: COMCAST

    To keep the same case

    So it isn't shouting... it is referring to them by their branding style.
     
  11. Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    Nov 15, 2005
    12GB ?

    wow... I would surpass that in the first week... with just normal usage.
     
  12. tuff bob

    tuff bob Icon

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    Mar 4, 2007
    let me ask you this ... is your bandwidth bill more than 50x your comcast connection (300/6)? ... thats why there are other limits.
     
  13. jutley

    jutley Godfather

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    Oct 11, 2006
    They don't really cap you at the 12GB, they just throttle you back to 1/2 of the normal bandwidth. Either way, yeah it sucks to be so limited. No Comcast, no Qwest DSL...nothing. I'm currently working with some others in my community to get the city council to be a part of a private fiber connection so a few years down the road we can have some options in our city, but I digress.
     
  14. SeattleSteve

    SeattleSteve Cool Member

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    Oct 5, 2007
    I think if you check again you'll see the magic two words "up to" before that 6MB connection. I've never seen it left out. That means you are never guaranteed a 6MB connection. The only thing the really are guaranteeing is they won't allow you to have more than that.
     
  15. wavemaster

    wavemaster Godfather

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    Sep 15, 2007
    Let me answer you this, We pay the amount we contracted for. We ONLY expect the service we contract for.

    Comcast is supposed to provide 6 Mb/down and 1.5 up. Not sometimes, not most of the time and they have NEVER said at which times.

    First off I have NEVER got 6Mb/sec. off the CM about 3.02 is the highest I have ever seen. Second, never over 900 up.

    I have never been contacted by the fiber providers threating to turn off our connections (They are kind of like the Lays potato chip company - "don't worry we'll make more").

    Regardless, we should ALL get what we pay for.

    <kidding> It would be cool of comcast said we we really don't provide what you contracted for but for an extra fee we would actually provide what you pay for...... </kidding>
     
  16. oakwcj

    oakwcj Lower Echelon

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    Sep 28, 2006
    DirecTV is a California corporation, so the very good provisions of the unfair competition statutes [California Business & Professions Code sections 17000 et seq.] are applicable to it. They provide for quite severe penalties on a class basis, as well as for attorney's fees under a private attorney general framework. DirecTV has been involved in some litigation under these statues -- for example, the HD-Lite case -- but nothing directly relevant to this thread, AFAIK. But the very existence of these statutes probably keeps them from trying to enforce some of the early termination provisions.

    Your basic point is correct, but the right case with the right attorney would probably not settle with an NDA. I don't consider the HD-Lite case to be anywhere near the right one. I think non-disclosure agreements in consumer protection cases are generally against public policy and that judges should almost never approve them.
     
  17. DarkAudit

    DarkAudit Godfather

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    Sep 10, 2007
    They're throttling your connection based on the content of the data stream now. Bittorrent is used for perfectly legal uses, but Comcast will still block connections.

    Blizzard uses torrents to distribute their World of Warcraft patches. Sounds like Comcast may be guilty of restraint of trade there.
     
  18. BlackDynamite

    BlackDynamite Legend

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    Jun 5, 2007
  19. dbmaven

    dbmaven Icon

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    May 29, 2004
    In an attempt to get this somewhat back on track regarding the original post regarding P2P "managing" by Comcast, specifically using the Sandvine product(s)......

    I'm at a loss to understand how this would impact DOD. Of course, not knowing the specific technologies being used, this is an exercise in guesswork - but I'll indulge nonetheless.

    Some key points:
    - the P2P management is targeted at uploads from your IP
    - the P2P management is looking for specific types of upload packets/messages - from certain P2P applications

    DOD is initiated either through remote booking, or by selecting something from the Guide/menu of available titles. Once 'verified', a download of some type takes place from a DirecTV host to your "client" (the HR2x DVR). This could be in the form of an ftp file transfer. Or it could be a custom application/download file manager.

    It would be surprising if D* were using some form of P2P client - since they want the content to come strictly from their servers (a means of verifying that you have proper authorization for the content being received).

    In short, for these reasons, it is unlikely that Sandvine is impacting DOD at this time. It interferes with the upload/sharing aspect of P2P apps, and since DOD isn't doing uploading, it's probably not having any effect.

    Could this change? Does Sandvine have the ability to inspect and 'block' or otherwise interfere with DOD ?? Good question - and I can't answer that. Maybe someone will read this who has experience with the product and can comment.

    The 'invisi-caps' that Comcast uses is a completely different, although certainly relevant, conversation in the context of DOD.

    For those with Comcast service, in the short term my recommendation would be to limit your DOD downloads to "off-hours" periods (after midnight to 7 AM).
    To facilitate this, D* may want to consider adding some 'filter' criteria to the DOD and Remote Booking products - allowing the user to specify a download start time, and a download rate (high, medium, low). Armed with such tools (and provided they would use the tools!) users could probably avoid most limits that many ISPs are starting to place on their service. (Visit the Broadband Reports Road Runner Forum for a months long thread regarding packet shaping. ).

    For better or worse, the TOS of most ISPs is similar to Comcast's - they reserve the right to change it at any time for any reason, and as long as it is posted on their website, and you have free access to that site and the content, they're in the clear. It really doesn't matter how they advertised the service when you signed up.
     
  20. tiger2005

    tiger2005 Godfather

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    Sep 22, 2006
    I think this is the whole point. What's to stop Comcast from adding DTV's DoD service as an application to throttle or cut-off? Technically, the DoD service is different, but the end result of using a substantial amount of bandwidth isn't. Which is the reason I'd be worried if I had Comcast and intended to use the DoD service a lot.
     
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