1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Welcome to the new DBSTalk community platform. We have recently migrated to a community platform called Xenfono and hope you will find this change to your liking. There are some differences, but for the most part, if you just post and read, that will all be the same. If you have questions, please post them in the Forum Support area. Thanks!

Comcast using customers wifi to extend network

Discussion in 'Tech Talk - Gadgets, Gizmos and Technology' started by dpeters11, Jun 18, 2013.

  1. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

    16,184
    483
    May 30, 2007
    Cincinnati
    They are using a guest side on XFinity customers routers to allow other customers access to the Internet. They say it doesn't affect bandwidth of the "host" customer (I don't see how this is true), and doesn't affect their data quota. You have to opt out of the program.

    http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57588325-94/comcast-expands-wi-fi-network-with-new-neighborhood-initiative/

    I'm not an xfinity customer, but I'd certainly opt out. The average ISP provided equipment generally isn't known for getting updated, who knows if there is a security vulnerability that allows someone to get to the other side?
     
  2. peds48

    peds48 DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

    18,431
    912
    Jan 10, 2008
    NY
    Hmmm, this explains why all of a sudden there is an influx of strange vehicles parked in front of the house next door to mine.
     
  3. Jacob Braun

    Jacob Braun King of Awesome

    1,158
    166
    Oct 5, 2011
    Tulsa, OK
    Uhh yeah no. That is certainly a reason one would want to opt out of this. And how could it not hamper the bandwidth on your router (unless it basically had duplicate hardware and antennas in the router I would think that would be impossible)?
     
  4. peds48

    peds48 DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

    18,431
    912
    Jan 10, 2008
    NY
    Well I have not seen such hardware (the gateway). But it could be that there are two "routers" in one package?
     
  5. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

    16,184
    483
    May 30, 2007
    Cincinnati
    You've still got one connection coming in. They seem to assume that no one is going to be torrenting.

    In reality, I don't see what the point of it all is. I don't go to a residential neighborhood and want to get on the Internet. I'm in an area with businesses. So what legitimate use is really there?
     
  6. peds48

    peds48 DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

    18,431
    912
    Jan 10, 2008
    NY
    You've still got one connection coming in. They seem to assume that no one is going to be torrenting.

    In reality, I don't see what the point of it all is. I don't go to a residential neighborhood and want to get on the Internet. I'm in an area with businesses. So what legitimate use is really there?


    What does "one connection coming in" has to do with anything. at the end of the day, is all one network. Regarding the point, I guess you are not in the service industry where you depend a lot on cell service. If I had cable service, this would be a HUGE plus for me as 90% of my customers that I am installing DirecTV for, have and are keeping their cable internet service. Perhaps, if this actually works, I may actually consider changing from FiOS to Cablevision.
     
  7. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

    16,184
    483
    May 30, 2007
    Cincinnati
    I think of this as a VLAN. Some VLANs share bandwidth, some have a minimum bandwidth guarantee. I wonder how they'll split that up. Both go through the same cable connection.

    I don't trust ISP hardware or Linksys, but this is just problematic to me. Maybe not as bad as Frontier giving customers wireless routers, not telling them and leaving it unencrypted with default logins, but not good either.
     
  8. Jacob Braun

    Jacob Braun King of Awesome

    1,158
    166
    Oct 5, 2011
    Tulsa, OK
    Well the one connection coming in thing is not a big deal depending on the area. My connection is 12Mbps but my DOCSIS 3 8x4 modem can in theory provide over 300Mbps down/100Mbps up. Now whether or not Cox can support that is another thing. But I really wouldn't want people camping outside my place even if it doesn't affect my performance at all (and in some ways it would, because all cable is shared).

    [​IMG]
     
  9. djlong

    djlong Hall Of Fame

    4,343
    57
    Jul 8, 2002
    New Hampshire
    If I had Comcast, that would be another reason for me to use my OWN router.
     
  10. grover517

    grover517 AllStar

    161
    4
    Sep 29, 2007
    I have always owned my own modem and router on Comcast/Xfinity instead of relying on their "leased" equipment.
     
  11. houskamp

    houskamp New Member

    8,636
    3
    Sep 14, 2006
    think of the bandwidth you could get by bridging all your neighbors hotspots :)
     
  12. peds48

    peds48 DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

    18,431
    912
    Jan 10, 2008
    NY
    I have always owned my own modem and router on Comcast/Xfinity instead of relying on their "leased" equipment.


    Same reason why I love FiOS. ethernet cable straight from the ONT to my Apple Extreme router. no modem or whatever required, as long as you don't have their TV services
     
  13. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    14,890
    283
    Jan 18, 2007
    Northern...
    I don't expect to see people flocking around my home any time soon. I have trouble getting a signal beyond my decks. But then again I don't have one of the "recently introduced a new Wireless Gateway that gives customers the nation’s fastest wireless speeds with the most coverage throughout the connected home." That device is what makes it possible and is described as follows:

     

Share This Page