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Converting MRV from Home Network to "Supported", and from legacy to SWiM

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Connected Home' started by GregAmy, Oct 18, 2011.

  1. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    No, it's DirecTV's version [as they are part of the alliance].
    MoCA comes in many "flavors", and DirecTV uses the 550 MHz CF, which the others don't.
     
  2. DarkLogix

    DarkLogix Godfather

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    Ok so other than the frenquency is it the same and if not how so?
    you've said you don't have further details so I think at some point I'll have to buy one and open it up and look up the partnumbers of the chips
     
  3. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    While I know you want to know more, what you want would need to come from DirecTV, as it's there version.
     
  4. DarkLogix

    DarkLogix Godfather

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    Ya
    and I doubt I'll get the R&D dept on the phone to ask about the details
    but from opening one and looking up the chip part numbers I can gain some insight into it, maybe not as much as I want but more than I have.
     
  5. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    To the client who wants to get out, it isn't noise. It is someone else keying at the same time.
     
  6. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Since this is a DirecTV thread, "once again" your post/reply is meaningless.
     
  7. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    So it isn't possible that two clients can request service at the same instant in the window set aside for transmission of remote commands?
     
  8. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    :confused: How the #$^* does a remote have anything to do with a networking topic here?
    [oh never mind, it's just another ridiculous post from you]
     
  9. DarkLogix

    DarkLogix Godfather

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    well based on the context I don't think he's referring to a TV remote but using remote in the sense of local v remote.

    i.e. a remote device is a device that is not in front of you and a device that’s in front of you is the local device

    so applying those contextual bits of info he's saying a device in room A and a device in room B sending data on the common coax at the same time.

    However IF what he claimed earlier is accurate then it would prevent this
     
  10. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Remote control commands from a WHDS client are not nearly as predictable as video streams yet they must share the same bandwidth. It has absolutely everything to do with DIRECTV and DECA.

    On the other hand, it wouldn't apply in a switched Ethernet scenario.
     
  11. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Garbage
     
  12. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    WHDS over DECA transmits remote control commands from client to server using magic?
     
  13. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I have absolutely no #$%*ing idea of what you're talking about.
    The remotes I have only send commands to the receiver their coded to.
    Any "commands" over the network from WHDS clients, would be the same commands be it DECA or ethernet.
    If you're somewhere way the hell out there, asking about any DECA network management commands, as nobody knows how it's being done, there is no reason to think that these would impact the data, as they could be on their own frequency. There is so much potential bandwidth with a clock of 550 MHz and the 50 Mhz bandwidth.
    We're only using MoCA 1.1, and 2.0 looks much faster:
    http://www.mocalliance.org/MoCA_2/index.php
     
  14. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    You have always been in favor of ethernet over RF networking.
    1 gigabit ethernet, duplexed "at best" could carry 2 Gb/s data.
    50 MHz to 1 GHz of RF [or 950 MHz of bandwidth], using the ATSC model, could carry 3 Gb/s.
     
  15. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    DECA doesn't use 9,950MHz of bandwidth. It has an effective maximum transfer rate of 175Mbps (regardless of center frequency) and is half duplex.

    Somewhere in the time division there is an interval set up for clients to make requests of their respective servers. Unless each client has its own interval, there is a possibility that two clients will ask for an interval at the same instant. It would seem that simultaneous requests would be lost to interference. This is the same way collisions were experienced and handled before switching (ignoring token passing schemes).

    Switched Ethernet doesn't lose packets even if they do come in simultaneously.

    I get it; DECA is something that doesn't require an additional low voltage license to install. That's good for the pay TV and broadband providers. I'm not conditioned to believe that what's best for the provider is necessarily ideal for me.

    I believe that at some point in the not-too-distant future, RF will no longer be part of most people's entertainment experience. Media of all kinds will be carried over IP connections to devices large and small. I see IP over coax as being an interim step (kind of like HomePlug was in the early days of "cinema connection kits".
     
  16. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    And "the garbage" continues :nono:

    Let us know when your provider offers anything like DECA and you have any first hand experience with it.
     
  17. GregAmy

    GregAmy AllStar

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    "Project SWM/DECA Conversion" is a success. I'd like to thank everyone in this thread for their assistance (despite the entertaining side conversations...;)).

    I ended up going with the SMW8 and splitter version; it was cheaper and helluva lot less work. The hard part was just finding mounting spots for all the components and a power strip. For the DECA part I bought three DECA off eBay for my receivers, and one of those wired "routers" (or is it a bridge?) to connect between my splitter and home network. All went in fine, I didn't even have to change my existing static IPs in the receivers. It was kinda disappointing, though, being able to get rid of two B-Band Converters but having to put a DECA back on (anyone want to buy 6 BBCs?) I'll look into replacing my receivers with 24s or something like that; I'm thinking of just going with a H25/C30(?) for the garage, anyway, especially if I can get a HR34.

    Kinda impressed about how hot the components are running, especially the SWM8; even the DECA are getting warm. I'm wondering how much more electricity I'll be using with this setup...

    Got a couple questions:

    - DECA works fine without having called DTV. Other than getting blessed as "supported", why would I want to call them and deal with possibly getting rejected? Where's the value? Can't I just play dumb if there's a problem and tell them at that time the DECA was already installed and working fine?

    - PokerJoker on page 1 noted "Use only compression-type RG6 fittings (preferably PPC EX6XL), never use crimp or twist-on!" I went with crimp fittings because that's all the tools and fittings I have, and it seems to work fine. I'll look into getting a good tool and materials for making compression fittings going forward, but what's the disadvantage of going with crimp-type?

    Thanks, all! - GA
     

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