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D* disagrees with everybody on this forum about Native mode

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by furjaw, Aug 3, 2007.

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  1. tonyd79

    tonyd79 Hall Of Fame

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    My TV is XBR1. I think I read that the XBR2 does a much better job of upconverting SD programming. If so, I can see the difference. Likewise with my DVD player. Letting it convert 480p to 1080i is better than sending 480p to my TV and letting it upconvert.

    I have seen very little difference with 720p versus the HR20 doing the converting to 1080i but I figure there must be some as there would be two conversions going on (720p to 1080i then a deinterlacing), so I live with the transition for 720p.
     
  2. Milominderbinder2

    Milominderbinder2 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '08

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    Here is what the manual (User Guide) says on page 74:

    If you turn on Native mode, the receiver will automatically adjust resolution to
    match the resolution of individual TV programs as they are tuned.


    They give a good example showing how Native Mode Off works on page 83:

    For example, if you indicated that your TV supports only 1080i, 480i and 480p and it is a 16:9 television, and Native is turned off*, the cycle of settings for the FORMAT key are as follows...

    ...In Native mode, the receiver automatically adjusts resolutions to match the resolution of individual TV programs as they are tuned...

    ...If Native is turned on, the FORMAT key cycles through Stretch, Letter and Crop for the current TV program’s native resolution.


    Both are exactly correct. Where does the User Guide say the opposite of this?

    Also tech support was spot on. Staying in one resolution allows faster channel changes.

    As Hasan said, try different settings for yourself and see what is best for you.

    - Craig
     
  3. convem24

    convem24 Icon

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    A scaler changes the game at that point, but most TVs I have seen without a scaler seem to perform better with native off but again I reserve the right to be wrong. Overall I guess it depends on the brand of TV and how well that tv deals with native settings.​
     
  4. armophob

    armophob Difficulty Concen........

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    This would be so much easier if they would just broadcast all programming in 1080i.
     
  5. pprather

    pprather Legend

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    i can see a very noticeable difference using my Elite CRT with the native ON and 480i 720p and 1080i selected. The problem i have is every once in a while the HDMI will cause the machine to lock up. It's an HDMI to DVI cable. So it's a little frustrating. I ended up turning native to OFF to bypass this headache. I notice the biggest difference on SD programs.
     
  6. BuffaloDenny

    BuffaloDenny Icon

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    +1​
     
  7. Philby

    Philby AllStar

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    So if I set it to native and only select 720p and 1080i - what will it output when I come to an SD (480i)? 720p? 1080i? nothing?
     
  8. machavez00

    machavez00 Hall Of Fame

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    Phoenix,...
    720p
     
  9. cygnusloop

    cygnusloop Hall Of Fame

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    In this case, SD will be outputted at 720p.

    If format is set to pillarbox, you will get the HR20 generated pillars, intended to be viewed in a 16:9 environment.

    If format is set to crop, the top and bottom of the picture will be lopped off, good for letterboxed SD programming, intended to be viewed in a 16x9 environment.

    If format is set to stretch, nothing will be appended to the frame, nor any cropping applied. If the HDTV is in a 16:9 mode, then it will, in fact, appear stretched. If the HDTV is in a 4:3 viewing mode (as in the TV is generating the pillars), the frame will not be stretched or squished in any way. Stretch is also the appropriate mode if you want to use one of the variable stretch modes that some TV's have for 4:3 programming.

    EDIT: All that being said, some HDTV's don't allow for switching between 4:3 and 16:9 modes if the incoming resolution is an HD resolution (720p/1080i), although some do. The simple fix to this, even for those TV's that don't support 480i over HDMI is to enable 480p in the resolutions tab.

    This has the advantage of allowing the HDTV (in almost all cases) to have a setting for SD stuff (like TV generated pillars) and a 16:9 setting for HD stuff. this way, when you switch between SD and HD programming, the TV knows how to format the picture to your liking. The fact that my TV will automatically put up its pillars (which are far superior to the HR20's) whenever I am watching a SD program is one of the key advantages to native mode, IMHO.
     
  10. machavez00

    machavez00 Hall Of Fame

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    My Sammy does not pass 480i over HDMI and this is why I have 720p/1080i selected. Instead of SD doing a 480i>480p>720p convert, I have 480i>720p, and 1080i at the set. If your set supports all resolutions over HDMI, native on, all selected, is the way to go with a 1080p set. IMHO
     
  11. machavez00

    machavez00 Hall Of Fame

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    Samsung sets call "TNT Stretch-o-Vision" "Panorama"
     
  12. RehabMan

    RehabMan Godfather

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    The disadvantage of having your 16:9 TV put up its pillars for 4:3 content is that then the HR20 GUI (guide, list, etc) are displayed with pillars. Allowing the HR20 to do the pillars avoids pillars in the HR20 GUI.

    A trade off, I suppose.
     
  13. cygnusloop

    cygnusloop Hall Of Fame

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    A very good point, RehabMan, and one I should have stated up front. But for me, the trade off is more than worth it. Why? I've posted it before, but here it is again:

    Why I prefer my TV's pillarbars. A short Rant in two parts.

    Part One.
    I prefer my TV's pillarbars because they have some overscan. The HR20's pillarbars just append black (or grey) bars to the 640x480 frame. With the HR20's bars, you see all the "junk" in the "gutters" of the 4:3 frame. Sometimes this junk is not that bad, but sometimes it's a bright blue line. On some British programs, it's just hideous black and white checkerboard looking stuff. My TV's pillarbars hide all this "junk".

    Part Two.
    I prefer my TV's pillarbars because they are really, really black. I have a DLP TV. So I don't have burn in(out) concerns, but those equally apply. The DLP generated edges are razor sharp, and the bars are just dead, black pixels. IMO, the DLP creates a superior 4:3 frame for viewing 4:3 content when compared to the pillarbox mode of the HR20.
     
  14. cygnusloop

    cygnusloop Hall Of Fame

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    duplicate post for some reason. sorry
     
  15. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    As most all (if not all) 1080i content is upscaled by the receiver horizontally, it is unlikely that the difference that you perceive is real.
     
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