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DIRECTV HD Channel Anticipation (Official Q2 2011 Thread)

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Programming' started by Scott Kocourek, Mar 17, 2011.

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  1. Jun 2, 2011 #3221 of 4112
    erosroadie

    erosroadie Godfather

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    Hmmm. If memory serves me correctly, back in 1965, while my parents lived in San Pedro, CA, we had CABLE TV! All that it offered were the network feeds for CBS, ABC, NBC and PBS, with one or two independent stations. Only benefit to cable was a clearer picture. As I recall, compared to our attic antenna, this was generally true, even on our 19” B/W Sylvania TV.

    CRAP! I’m OLD!!!
    :eek2:
     
  2. Jun 2, 2011 #3222 of 4112
    Avder

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    19 inch black and white tv? They actually made those?

    I remember watching Bozo the Clown every morning on WGN before school.
     
  3. Jun 2, 2011 #3223 of 4112
    Santi360HD

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    I remember when D* added WGN in HD / ESPN U / and the Fox Soccer Channels in HD..

    Reminded me when my cable company made TBS and ESPN (as they used to share) stand alone 24 hour channels and ESPN2 & TNT came along with their sports venues...even back then Sports came 1st...and this is the current day mentality at D* sports in HD come first

    AMC BBCA in HD...yeah no hurry........
     
  4. Jun 2, 2011 #3224 of 4112
    georule

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    +1 Filmed 4:3. What would that be in actual content area resolution? I know they'd still say 1920x1080i technically because they'd count the black bars, but the actual 4:3 content area would be what? XXXXx1080i, I guess.
     
  5. Jun 2, 2011 #3225 of 4112
    Tom Robertson

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    If shot and edited on real film, something in roughly equivalent to a 2000-4000 range is what I've heard. :)

    That is why Hogan's Heros looked so great on HDNET, real film is still much better than 1080i. :)

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  6. Jun 2, 2011 #3226 of 4112
    georule

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    Yes, indeed. HH fan here too, and saw those. Even the DVDs of HH looked much better than a lot of TV series from the 70's-90's on DVD.

    But that's not quite what I meant. 1080i as a standard just means you have to have 1080 lines of vertical resolution. This is why Dish can get away with what they do and still call it 1080i. Right?

    But if you're broadcasting a 1920x1080i signal of content that is in 4:3 with black bars on either side to "fill out" to 1920, the 4:3 area is still 1080 lines of vertical resolution. . . but the actual horizontal content area of the 4:3 (excluding the black bars) is now significantly less than 1920. Yes, this is my math being weak. 1440? 1920/4*3? Heh. That number looks familiar. . . (of course in this case it wouldn't be spread out over the full screen).

    So for the content we're talking about with current tech, you'd still get 1440x1080 instead of 640x480 of lines of resolution of the actual content area (again, excluding black bars).
     
  7. Jun 2, 2011 #3227 of 4112
    maartena

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    Up until the late 80ies, most material for television series productions was shot on actual film, and a "resolution" really does not apply. Depending on what is being produced, material was shot in 4:3 for television, or either 1.85:1 or 2.39:1 for actual theater style movies.

    Material produced inside television studios, such as game shows, sit-coms, talk shows and whatnot were filmed using cameras that had cable feeds to a central processing station, where all the tracks were recorded on to magnetic tapes. (And/or sent to broadcast stations for live broadcasts of course).

    When these are "digitally remastered", the end-result of course depends on what the source was.... even a 1940's movie can look stunning in HD, because the resolution, if you can call it that, of a film is higher then current HD standards. However, you will never see a digitally remastered version of Archie Bunker or Cosby Show in HD, because it was recorded on a much lower standard.

    By the late 80ies, television studios started to go digital, and many shows were recorded in early forms of HD. A prime example is Seinfeld. Seinfeld's season finale was on TV when the first real HDTV wasn't even on the market, and NO stations were actually broadcasting in HD, except for a few tests and experiments through universities. However, the SOURCE was digitally recorded and high quality. As a result, we can now enjoy pretty damn goodlooking HD versions of Seinfeld episodes, even though the series ended in 1998.

    When a 4:3 show is broadcast on a HD station, and has black bars on the side, the signal is sent as 1920x1080 (1080i), but the bit-rate is a lot lower. Sometimes old shows are broadcast on HD stations, so you can see the quality is lower, but it is just layered under a 1080i feed. It can switch to a full-HD commercial without skipping a beat or changing resolutions.

    I think with some of the older shows, we get to "hung up" on modern tv buzz words such as resolution, 1080i/720p, etc.... while the show was originally recorded on a magnetic tape that wasn't really much more then a glorified VCR, but with tapes that hardly have quality loss.

    Amything television-pre-80ies, will never be "remastered" in HD.... old movies however, that is a different story, provided the original film is still in existence.
     
  8. Jun 2, 2011 #3228 of 4112
    maartena

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    It will be broadcasted as 1920x1080 to your TV, you just get a bunch of black pixels with it too. :D

    You won't have any resolution changes when a full HD commercial comes on in between your 1970ies sitcom. ;)
     
  9. Jun 2, 2011 #3229 of 4112
    Beerstalker

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    The actual area of the picture would be 1440x1080, but they would include black or grey pillar bars in the signal to make it 1920x1080. Just like how 2.39:1 movies are encoded as 1920x1080 but the picture is actually 1920x803.
     
  10. Jun 2, 2011 #3230 of 4112
    Beerstalker

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    I wouldn't say that. It has already happened. Hogans Heroes, Twilight Zone, and Star Trek are just a few I can think of off the top of my head. Any TV show that was shot on film can be re-mastered to HD. Some shows that were shot on film then scanned to video to add special effects etc, are much less likely to be done though (the special effecs either look bad compared to the film, or they have to be re-done).

    Shows shot on video will most likely not get remastered, as there won't be much of an improvement in the quality. They may eventually get upscaled/cropped/etc though so they look better on HD channels, and could possibly be released on Blu-Ray with a bunch of episodes on one disc (instead of a full season taking up 6 discs it might all fit on one).
     
  11. Jun 2, 2011 #3231 of 4112
    Laxguy

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    Winters,...
    But many shows put down on real film got telecined in lo-rez, so they'd have to be done over before we could see 4:3 HD. But it'd be great to see that happen.
     
  12. Jun 2, 2011 #3232 of 4112
    Laxguy

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    Winters,...
    Yeah, me too. In the mid-fifties to mid-sixties, we had a tall rotating antenna, ground mounted with plenty of guy wires. It was replaced by a huge local antenna which served much of the town of 3.000 folk in Illinois. We were connected to it by ..... a ..... cable. Clearer picture, and no more cursing at the rotator.;)
     
  13. Jun 2, 2011 #3233 of 4112
    Mike Bertelson

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    You are correct. Also, The Prisoner.

    I've even read about converting Star Trek to 3D.

    Mike
     
  14. Jun 2, 2011 #3234 of 4112
    ejjames

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    When I was 11, my dad brought home our first computer...a Commodore 64. For the first few months, we had it connected to a 19" B&W TV! :lol:

    Sitting for hours typing the BASIC programs from RUN magazine, usually missing a comma somewhere causing failure that haunts me to this day!

    Anyway, that tv made for a humorous looking workstation.
     
  15. Jun 2, 2011 #3235 of 4112
    zimm7778

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    WGN was cool back in the 80's and early 90's. Growing up I was able to watch most of the good cartoons like GI Joe and Transformers generally a half hour to an hour later than they aired on our eastern time zone channel. And I think everyone who had cable even one day of their lives watched Bozo on WGN.
     
  16. Jun 2, 2011 #3236 of 4112
    je4755

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    I'm late to this discussion but your comments bring back memories of childhood in Philadelphia. The first family on our block to own a TV had to place a large magnifying glass in front of the set because the screen was so small. There only were three channels – CBS, NBC and DuMont (later ABC) – but some of the local programming was outstanding, such as Ernie Kovacs. Our first independent channel was located in Wilmington, Delaware (subsequently a PBS station). Many years later my parents purchased an antenna with a rotor and we then were able to watch New York channels.
     
  17. Jun 2, 2011 #3237 of 4112
    RACJ2

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    Even though this thread has gone off on a tangent, its probably some of the most interesting nostalgic posts I've read. Bringing back memories of the the clicking and clacking of the rotary box as the antenna on the roof rotated. And on a clear day, aiming it across Lake Ontario and picking up CBC from Toronto. That was state of the art.

    Then when my uncle bought us the first home video console ever made, the Magnavox Oddessey [link], we thought we were uptown. Playing the first pong game at home. And taping the hockey overlay to the TV screen that had a goal at each end and still basically playing pong, how amazing was that. Those were the days!
     

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  18. Jun 2, 2011 #3238 of 4112
    carlsbad_bolt_fan

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    First computer I ever owned! Got it for Christmas, but no disk drive. Had to wait until new-years to get that.

    And RUN magazine...yes...guilty of typing in programs as well. :)
     
  19. Jun 3, 2011 #3239 of 4112
    Sea bass

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    Cheers episodes on HDNet is impressive. I've only seen the early episodes in HD 16x9 format. Very nice!
     
  20. Jun 3, 2011 #3240 of 4112
    ARKDTVfan

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    agree
    I'd love to see that show on Blu Ray


    hopefully D* adds the Encore channels when the HD comes:D
     
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