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DirecTV HR34-700....Certified

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by codespy, Feb 12, 2011.

  1. Feb 12, 2011 #21 of 106
    inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    Actually, last report was that it will work with existing hr's with mrv... Until its out, I won't believe either way...

    But you are right, thats a non starter for it for me...
     
  2. Feb 12, 2011 #22 of 106
    TXD16

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    The additional DECA hardware is superfluous in a properly functioning Ethernet networked environment, as is the required "professional" DECA installation.
     
  3. Feb 12, 2011 #23 of 106
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Easy for you to say! You're probably among the million or so (only 119,560, more or less of whom are subscribers!) :lol: folk in the US who're very comfortable and proficient in doing their own LAN, troubleshooting and maintaining. Long may y'all live!

    I don't mean this as sarcastic; my hat is off to those who do it. While I probably could, when I went whole home, I was mostly wireless anyway, so DECA made a lot of sense to me, esp. when my router florerablated a few weeks ago.
     
  4. Feb 12, 2011 #24 of 106
    junzi

    junzi Cool Member

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    My HR20 rocked over my obstinate HR23...It seems all their new receivers are designed to limit your use...I will consider it when it has 5 tuners and can handle more than 2TB fast and reliably
     
  5. Feb 12, 2011 #25 of 106
    TXD16

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    I am not at all suggesting that the DECA option be removed, but, rather, that the Ethernet option should not.
     
  6. Feb 12, 2011 #26 of 106
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    So in your opinion, the cost for the Ethernet components should still be incurred for the extremely small percentage of users that would choose that option? Given that DECA is the default, and is the installer trained installation method, that eliminates the vast majority and complexity from a DIRECTV support model.
     
  7. Feb 12, 2011 #27 of 106
    David MacLeod

    David MacLeod New Member

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    yes ??
    :) :)
    I know its the right decision but still.... sigh...
     
  8. Feb 12, 2011 #28 of 106
    Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    NY Hudson...
    I truly expect a premium charge for this one.
     
  9. Feb 12, 2011 #29 of 106
    Doug Brott

    Doug Brott Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    I do to .. especially in the beginning. That being said, I have no insight on the pricing model for the HR34.
     
  10. Feb 12, 2011 #30 of 106
    TXD16

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    Obviously, unlike you, I am not privy to what may currently constitute this "extremely small percentage," nor do I have the apparent forecasting ability that you seem to believe you possess, but I am not one for removing or limiting choices that already exist. Doing so will put off a certain part of that "extremely small percentage," and that's what I am against.

    Additionally, since the Ethernet as an option is officially "unsupported," I am a bit surprised to learn that it significantly contributes the the DIRECTV support effort, but, again, I will defer to your ability to avail yourself of information to which I simply do not have access.

    And "default" is certainly not cost-free as there is additional cost involved with DECA, including your aforementioned training, installation, support, and equipment costs, so it's obviously not a case of low-cost or free DECA versus costly Ethernet. In fact, with the Ethernet option, the entirety of the cost is borne by the customer, save the hardware cost of the receiver port, which the customer is also subsidizing via initial and recurring lease fees, so my guess would be that the overall cost to DIRECTV would be far less with "unsupported" Ethernet versus "default" DECA.

    The fact of the matter is that the Ethernet connectivity ability of its receivers contributes, however slightly, to the competitive advantage that I believe DIRECTV currently has over its rivals, and I hate to see the bean counters, in the name of short-term gain, continually chipping away at that advantage as it appears has been happening since the good Dr. Malone began exerting his influence (but that's another thread altogether).
     
  11. Feb 12, 2011 #31 of 106
    houskamp

    houskamp New Member

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    I think your missing that deca IS an ethernet connection.. nothing is lost by using deca over ethernet.. with deca built into the newer recievers there in much less cabling to be done to fully connect all recievers in a house..
     
  12. Feb 12, 2011 #32 of 106
    Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    Given the number of times I have to go to my mothers house to reset her router, or her dsl modem because no matter how many times I tell her how, or write down how, she never seems to know anything except to call my number and tell me AOL isnt working again. Since DirecTv is marketing whole home to people like my mother, who I am sure constitute a lot more of their customer base than we on this forum do, I can see why they would not want my mother calling them twice a week because her "shows" wont show up on her tv anymore...because the router crashed.
     
  13. Feb 12, 2011 #33 of 106
    houskamp

    houskamp New Member

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    plug router into lamp timer.. shut it off every late night for 10 minutes. I have one that's been running that way for years :D
     
  14. Feb 12, 2011 #34 of 106
    dsw2112

    dsw2112 Always Searching

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    Yep, at this point the argument is really an argument about what "connector" to use (pure ethernet vs DECA.) D* has stated that they want to get as many customer's receivers connected to the internet as possible. When they start providing broadband DECA's (including the installation) free of charge the ethernet argument will really be moot.

    I was a fan of keeping the ethernet jack some time ago, but with all new receivers having built-in DECA I no longer find the ethernet argument to hold water.
     
  15. Feb 12, 2011 #35 of 106
    TXD16

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    Again, no one is suggesting that the DECA option be removed for people like you, your mother, or anyone else who chooses to avail themselves of the service. I am simply arguing that it needn't necessarily be an either-or situation.

    Additionally, the Ethernet option is, and always has been, unsupported by DIRECTV, so the support burden on them is minimal to non-existent at worst.
     
  16. Feb 12, 2011 #36 of 106
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    Seriously now... check the attitude at the door. It won't get you very far in a constructive discussion on the matter.

    I an not "privy" to any special matter, but it doesn't take rocket scientist (which I know a few of) to apply pratical logic to the situation.

    As pointed out by MANY MANY of the users of this forum, hardwired solutions for home networks is not that common. My home is an anonmoly in my newly developed subdivsion, because frankly... I am a tech geek, and knew what my communciation needs were for my house.

    DECA, is a hardwired solution.. USING the required hardwire, for the SAT signal. Period. With the standardization of DIRECTV to the SWiM architecture, DECA comes native to it. With ZERO additional hardware with the H24, HR24, H25. Those boxes will be able to communicate with one another, with nothing else needed.

    For the other H2* and HR2* (except the H20's), you can add a DIRECTV DECA box, and they then can communicate... .nothing else needed.

    For those that WANT to have an ethernet connection, as pointed out by Doug, you can spend your money and get a single DECA box, and put your DECA network on your ethernet... For those that don't want to do that... you can go ahead and get any of the last 4 years of hardware (sans the H20) and have what you want.

    As for Unsupported... that is exactly it. Why should DIRECT add hardware to their boxes, which costs them money which they have to recoupe due to subsidation... for something they will not support for Whole Home. ?

    Sorry to say.. your argument that Ethernet by the customer is cost-free to DIRECTV. It isn't. Why? First the intial cost of having the components in the unit. Second, how many people have a "buddy" hook them up via this method, then it breaks... and their buddy isn't around, or can't solve it.

    Who do they call? 1-800-DIRECTV which just by dialing costs DIRECTV Money, and then if tech goes out... yep, costs.

    The sheer number of combinations for home networking is a complex mess.
    Look at the threads here in this forum, of people trying to help those that have ethernet headaches with MRV... look at the comlexity of different connection methods.

    DECA by far isn't a short-term solution. It is "the" solution that makes sense for a new install, and someone that isn't well verse in networking. The SWiM has proven itself already in reduce the complexity of a DIRECTV install. With the introduction of the SWiM-16 module, it can now support 8 DVRs on one dish. I will argue (no hard numbers to back it), that it covers well more then 95% of DIRECTV's residential customer base.

    All those systems can then talk to the other systems on that SWiM. DIRECTV then can support that install via the phone or techs because:
    1) The communication path is known
    2) The connection method is known
    3) There are diagnostic methods and tools developed to assist with that structure.

    Then... you are adding a SINGLE network connection via DECA module, to a users home network... Which that network connection can be taught and trained for the VAST majority of home networks, or as you put it... someone who has their custom network can go that one extra step, to put that DECA cloud on their network to get internet functionality to the DECA cloud.

    As for the comment regarding BEAN counters... it's called common sense.
    Why include equipment, that won't be used by the designed for user base.. which if there is a chance that it is needed by "one-off" needs, there is an alternative.

    --
    Switch it over to a different feature, that has been removed from the entire series.

    Should DIRECTV re-add the RF Modulated output to all these boxes?
    Gives people the option..
    Or for the deminishing number that need that type of input, they can purchase an RF-Modulator?

    And for the record, I am one of the later ones.
    I have two 4-port switches that push out an RF-Modulated signal, to my older CRT TV's that I have an R22 and HR23 connected.
    (which also gives me the ability to connect DVD players, and other component output devices too).
     
  17. Feb 12, 2011 #37 of 106
    dsw2112

    dsw2112 Always Searching

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    Future receivers are likely to function only on a SWM system and will contain DECA. I have also heard that D* will be providing a broadband DECA on an HR34 install (in addition to the necessary SWM infrastructure.)

    At this point the connection type doesn't really matter does it? The argument for ethernet was a cost argument; folks didn't want to pay D* to install the necessary SWM/DECA components when they had a perfectly functioning ethernet network (and the receivers had ethernet ports.) As a result we have unsupported MRV which remedies that problem.

    The argument for ethernet connectivity going forward is a bit confusing. D* is going to provide all the necessary elements for connectivity (at no additional cost.) TCP/IP is TCP/IP regardless of the connection type. If D* is going to provide the necessary components what would the argument be to select your connection type (and why would you care what medium the TCP/IP took?)
     
  18. Feb 12, 2011 #38 of 106
    Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    NY Hudson...
    Of course the HR34 being a MRV, would include a client and any additional clients should be cheap. How cheap depends if they have a tuner.
     
  19. Feb 13, 2011 #39 of 106
    TXD16

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    Quite simply because if anyone who currently has a pure Ethernet configuration desires to add a new receiver/DVR without the Ethernet capability, they will have no choice at that point but to add the DECA hardware.
     
  20. Feb 13, 2011 #40 of 106
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    How is adding the dec adapter any different then adding, say a USB dongle to add networking?
    Or adding a wifi access point, to support devices that only have wifi options?
     

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