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DirecTV Making All Subcribers Pay For NFL ST - Dish Claims

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by RACJ2, Jun 24, 2009.

  1. Jun 27, 2009 #61 of 128
    Ken S

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    I can tell their advertising seems to be working to some extent in my neighborhood I've seen a slew of Dish installs lately and in more than a few cases DirecTV dishes coming down. I'm sure DirecTV isn't going to be filing in bankruptcy court anytime soon, but Dish has and continues to be a pretty resilient competitor.
     
  2. Jun 28, 2009 #62 of 128
    gphvid

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    Thousand...
    That it, until the promotion period ends, and they see their actual bill.

    Hard to calculate anyway as the regular rate card appears to be missing from their web site. Only the promotional rate.
     
  3. Jun 28, 2009 #63 of 128
    Ken S

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    I just went to their site and it listed the promotional rates with the regular rates right underneath them...pretty standard...cable and DirecTV do the same thing.
     
  4. Jun 28, 2009 #64 of 128
    wmj5

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    I think D* should have a package with no sports in it, you know all people don't like sports and I don't have any use at all for any espn channel, I'm not running anybody down for watching sports, its everbody to his on, but if they had a package like that it might fool you how many customers they would pick up
     
  5. Jun 28, 2009 #65 of 128
    RACJ2

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    They already have the Family Package, which has no sports. Personally, I would like a package w/o kids channels and they don't even offer that. It would actually be nice if they had an "A La Cart" option where you could pick and choose channels. Although that probably won't happen since it would complicate billing. Since they seemed to be focused on adding sports enthusiasts, I doubt they will add any other packages w/o sports.

    From my past correspondence with a marketing director at TW cable, sports channels are the most expensive (that’s why they won’t carry NFLN and NHLN). By offering them in packages, D* can disperse the individual channel costs across more subscribers.
     
  6. Jun 28, 2009 #66 of 128
    DodgerKing

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    There are more than that in my area of LA, OC, RS, and SB county alone. And I am not talking about the whole county, I am only talking about this little part of the Inland Empire.

    LA county alone, I am sure, has more than 750 business with ST.
     
  7. Jun 28, 2009 #67 of 128
    RACJ2

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    I hear you, there are plenty down here in the Dallas/Fort Worth area as well. You have to take into consideration the less populated states that may not have near as many. So the 750 is an average/state, but I still think they are making a killing on businesses alone. The individual subscriptions are gravy.
     
  8. Jul 16, 2009 #68 of 128
    RACJ2

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    Now I'm convinced that D* breaks even on NFL ST with bars, restaurants and casinos alone. The rates start at $945 for an occupancy of up to 50 people and ends with $48,000 for 10,000+ occupancy.

    View attachment 19055
     
  9. Jul 16, 2009 #69 of 128
    mreposter

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    How do you manage to connect two TVs in two different rooms to one box and have each TV changing channels independently?
     
  10. Jul 16, 2009 #70 of 128
    evan_s

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    A lot of Dishes DVRs have 2 independent outputs allowing you to watch 1 thing on the main tv in hd and second thing on a different tv in SD. They are still limited to only 2 sat tuners tho so depending on how much and when the 2 tvs see use it can be a big issue.
     
  11. Jul 16, 2009 #71 of 128
    RACJ2

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    You can't do that with one receiver. Shades228 mentions "1 receiver covering 2 rooms isn't an issue for a single person as they won't watch both at the same time"
     
  12. Jul 16, 2009 #72 of 128
    mreposter

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    Back to the main topic... although I'm not much of a sports fan, I think Directv's NFL Sunday Ticket exclusive contract is likely a profit generator for the company. As many have said in this thread, it draws people to the service and increases overall revenues. The bar business is also huge.

    What I do get annoyed over about sports programming are channels like NFL Network and the dozen or so ESPNs that all subscribers are forced to pay for. These aren't free shopping/religious channels, Directv pays a per-subscriber fee for all of them, and the sports channels are some of the most expensive in the lineup.

    Others might complain that they don't want to pay the "Lifetime" tax or the "MSNBC" tax or the "Military Channel" tax, but none of these come close to what all subscribers are paying for the sports channels.

    Hate me if you want, it's probably my fault for being a New York Jets fan. ;)
     
  13. Jul 16, 2009 #73 of 128
    duffytoo

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    I would gladly pay 30 % more for Direct instead of Dish
     
  14. Jul 16, 2009 #74 of 128
    RACJ2

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    You are absolutely correct about the cost of sports channels. I had a connection with the Marketing Director at TW Cable. I suggested they do à la carte pricing. I would drop all the kids programming and many others and mainly subsribe to sports.

    He said its the most expensive and probably wouldn't save me anything, just less channels. Since the price per subscriber is high, thats probably why cable companies want to add NFL Network to their sports tier, instead of standard packages.
     
  15. Jul 16, 2009 #75 of 128
    hbkbiggestfan

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    The only thing that has me thinkning about switching to Dish (My D* Term is up) is TurboHD. It's seems like such a great deal for all the channels I really watch plus a couple D* does not have (WGN HD). Dish has a ton of fees however and it would cost me $200 to add a 2nd HD DVR with them. D* has offered me $99 for a 2nd HD DVR with $10 credit for 12/mo. Im still not sure if I will accept this offer or see If they will offer me more later on.
     
  16. Jul 17, 2009 #76 of 128
    jonkeee

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    I thought this was a really great article when I read it a few weeks ago. It had a nice chart that unfortunately this lacks showing the cost of some of these channels per household, based on the fees paid vs. actual viewership. NFL Network was way up there at something ridiculous like $8k per subscriber.

    Time to Screen Out Unloved Channels

    There is only one word for the amount of choice on TV: eye-glazing.

    As the TV industry tries to come up with a new business model to deal with the challenges posed by online video, it should consider shrinking the number of channels.

    It is doubtful viewers want as many as they have. In 2007, the average household tuned into only 16 channels of the 118 channels available, estimates Nielsen.

    Indeed, the explosion of channels was driven by cable operators' need for a marketing tool to convince people to pay for more choice, given the presence of free broadcast TV. That gave rise to a system where channels developed for cable are paid affiliate fees by cable and satellite operators. Broadcast networks, which individually draw much bigger audiences, generally don't receive fees.

    But what really distorts the picture is the absence of correlation between the size of the fees paid to individual cable channels and their audiences. Viacom's Nickelodeon is the most-watched cable channel, averaging about 1.7 million households a day last year, according to Nielsen. Yet it ranked 10th among cable channels in terms of affiliate fees in 2008, excluding premium channels, estimates SNL Kagan.

    Kagan estimates Nickelodeon's annual affiliate revenue was worth $312 a household. In contrast, Discovery Communications' Discovery Kids earned affiliate revenue of $1,871 for each of its 20,000 average daily household viewers last year.

    Channels showing live sports, such as Walt Disney's ESPN, draw the most fees per viewer, closely followed by channels owned by cable operators.

    The industry can't solve the online-video challenge without dealing with the disparities in these fees. Because broadcasters miss out, cable operators can't stop them offering some of their best shows on the Internet, where they can seek an incremental audience. That has contributed to worries about people turning off their video subscription and using Internet TV instead.

    Industry executives like to claim that people watch TV shows online because it is convenient. Maybe so. But some people also want to spend less on their cable bill. And one big factor driving up that bill is programming charges.

    A first step toward reinventing the business model would be to link fees paid by TV distributors to viewership, with a minimum audience level set for any fees.

    Some niche networks would likely go out of business. That would be a good thing. The TV industry suffers from an excess of supply. Shedding little-watched networks would restore some semblance of economic reason.

    Money saved could be returned to customers through lower charges or redirected to broadcasters. That would level the playing field and make it easier for the industry to come up with a coherent approach to the Web.

    -- Martin Peers
     
  17. Jul 17, 2009 #77 of 128
    JLucPicard

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    So ESPN charges a lot more per subscriber than Nickelodeon does? Surprise!!! I would imagine the costs of running ESPN are also grossly larger than it takes to run Nickelodeon, too.

    If ESPN was targetted at such a limited audience as Nickelodeon is (mainly young children, I'm assuming) and had little to no actual live programming/broadcasts and if the athletes, etc. that ESPN carries made child wages, then I could see a comparison of the two actually meaning something.
     
  18. Jul 17, 2009 #78 of 128
    bonscott87

    bonscott87 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '07

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    Be sure to do the math. Last time I did that with the Turbo HD package it only cost $5 more to get the Choice Xtra with HD and DVR package and you get all the SD channels to should you need them. Dish's Turbo HD package is mostly marketing hype and only worth it to a few. But maybe that's you. Plus you don't get dinged by all of Dish's nickle and diming you to death with fees.
     
  19. Jul 17, 2009 #79 of 128
    mreposter

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    And maybe the reason some of these guys are paid 10's of millions of dollars a year is that it's so easy to extract that money from cable/sat viewer's wallets.
     
  20. Jul 18, 2009 #80 of 128
    CincySaint

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    That article seems a bit simplistic.

    For one thing, advertisers are not just interested in the total number of viewers. High demand demographics like young men tend to watch programming like ESPN which leads to its higher rights fees.

    For cable and satellite, the other factor is subscriber acquisition and retention. While I don't doubt that lots of people young and old enjoy Nick programming, I doubt there are many people that would have the inclusion of those channels drive their TV programming source decision. On the other hand, look at the fighting between D* and the cablecos over Sunday Ticket. Since ST has proven to be magnet for certain subs, the companies were willing to back up a money truck to the NFL and empty it.
     

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