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DirecTV Not Providing HBO GO for Roku

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by oakwcj, Oct 29, 2011.

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  1. Drew2k

    Drew2k New Member

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    The original Roku was limited to 720p, but that's not been the case for a while.

    Roku Product Comparison: http://www.roku.com/roku-products

    Roku versus other Streamers: http://www.roku.com/compare_netflix_ready_devices
     
  2. oakwcj

    oakwcj Lower Echelon

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  3. Drew2k

    Drew2k New Member

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    Ah, yes I did. Got it... Thanks.
     
  4. ChicagoBlue

    ChicagoBlue Godfather

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    My opinion....your Roku is hooked up to your television. The iPad, the smart phone, the PC is not. That's the difference. DTV wants to own the television. Just my opinion.

    Then again, if they authorize for the Xbox but still don't for Roku then it obviously means something with Roku is going on.
     
  5. RickD_99

    RickD_99 Mentor

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    Wrong sir! My HTPC *is* most certainly hooked up to the same TV that my Roku is attached to. I can watch HBO GO on my TV any time I want via my HTPC. Remember that lots of folks are buying laptops these days with HDMI outs so they theoretically could access this service in the same manner. So if D*'s policy is truly to "own the TV" then why allow PC access and make the Roku the red-headed step child?

    What astonishes me about this whole episode is the lack of communication from D*. You would think that a company that is so dependent on customer satisfaction would at least make some sort of attempt to explain their decision to us. Their half assed email replies to our complaints to the President's Office hardly qualifies as communication IMHO.
     
  6. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Is this HTPC your daily driver or really more a part of your home entertainment system?
     
  7. RickD_99

    RickD_99 Mentor

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    It's more a part of my home entertainment system as is the Roku. My D*
    HR24 is and will remain as the daily driver.
     
  8. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    I'll bet that less people have a pc hooked up to their tvs than there is people who have a roku hooked up to their vs. Roku is meant to be a set top box only, and is its sole purpose. It is a direct competitor to Directv. PC's just aren't. The masses have never jumped on the bandwagon of hooking up their computers to tvs.

    As others have said, what happens when the xbox version goes live should be most interesting. Will they or won't they.

    You know, I read an article about why STARZ didn't re-up its streaming rights with Netflix, and it was the same concept here i think. In general, it now undercuts the value of their service. I imagine the same thing goes for Directv. They feel it undercuts the value of their services, and its difficult to disagree with that from a big picture kind of way, not a customer kind of way.
     
  9. RickD_99

    RickD_99 Mentor

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    Roku was introduced in 2008....and to date they have sold a million units total in those 3 years. Hardly Apple iPod or iPad-like numbers. I'm having a hard time understanding how DirecTV or any other MSO could view Roku as a threat.

    I'm betting it will be available on Xbox and I'm also betting we'll never know the real reason why.

    Well if that is true am I not "undercutting the value" of their service by watching HBO GO on the iPad, smart phone, or PC? And yet DirecTV seemingly has no problem making the service available on those platforms. Am I the only one seeing the inconsistencies here? :nono2:
     
  10. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    I thought i read somewhere they are expecting to have 3 million rokus in homes by the end of the year. I'll have to look sometime.

    Actually, no you are not at all undercutting the value by using an iPad or smart phone, or even computer monitor. That Is extending the experience to somewhere that you cannot otherwise get the service no matter what. A roku is trying to replace your current set top boxes hooked up to your tvs, which is the traditional viewing location. Big difference, and why The more I think about it, the less I think we will see it on the Xbox.
     
  11. Blurayfan

    Blurayfan Hall Of Fame

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    IMO DirecTV should allow access on any device that HBO Go or MAX Go are available to. After all DirecTV won't be losing subscribers by allowing this since to gain access you need to subscribe to the channels through your provider. On the other hand not allowing access may cause subscriber to leave for a provider who does allow the use on the preferred device.
     
  12. Devo1237

    Devo1237 Legend

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    That would be the logical opinion for sure. I guess they're scared of giving the customer too many options.
     
  13. ChicagoBlue

    ChicagoBlue Godfather

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    The way DTV adds customers each quarter, they aren't scared of anybody.

    They have a right to protect their revenue streams, that includes lease fees on receivers. They want to control the television. If people decide in the 3rd and 4th room they want to just have a Roku or Xbox instead of a DTV receiver, that hurts their revenue. That means higher prices for all of us.

    I have no problem with them wanting to protect their revenue streams, smart companies do that. The number of people that will leave is miniscule as it relates to Roku. Now, when Xbox functionality comes out, then they (DTV) has a much tougher decision to make.
     
  14. ChicagoBlue

    ChicagoBlue Godfather

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    You are the corner or corner cases. Most people do not hook up their PC to their television. Most people in this country don't even know how or that it's even possible. Those that do know it's possible, the vast vast majority don't bother too because they have a set top box that provides programming for their television.
     
  15. DawgLink

    DawgLink Woof Woof Woof

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    Roku would have absolutely zero to do with higher prices. DirecTV agreements, yearly increases, etc...are the common causes.
     
  16. RickD_99

    RickD_99 Mentor

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    OK let's assume you are correct and that D*'s decision is all about protecting revenue streams. Shouldn't Dish Network be equally concerned about protecting revenue streams? And yet Dish Network allows HBO GO on the Roku while D* does not. Do you have an explanation for this inconsistency?
     
  17. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    Have you read what Starz is about to do? Looks like they will offer streaming of their programming, a la hbo go style, and they might make it available to people directly as a streaming product, for a fee. They are going to let customers cut out the middle men, of cable and sat. Prices are about to sky rocket as others try this a la cart via streaming scenario. Yeah, I can easily see why DIrecTV doesn't want these services available in any way on TV screens.
     
  18. Chuck W

    Chuck W Icon

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    HBO wanted to do the same thing and the cable companies came back and said if you cut us out and offer it direct, then we drop your channels. That's why you have the HBOGO you see today. I'd be very surprised if Starz offers it direct.
     
  19. ChicagoBlue

    ChicagoBlue Godfather

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    My comment about higher prices is tied to a shortening of revenue from the set top boxes, not related simply to Roku.

    On average, DTV customers have about 2.5 receivers per account. That's the latest figure I'm aware of. That means they are making 1.5 X $6 X 18 million X 12 months (remember the first receiver is free). That's $1,944,000,000 in revenue every year give or take.

    That's a lot of money they are going to protect. Rest assured, if that revenue source drops, whether we like it or not, they will take up something else to make up for it.
     
  20. ChicagoBlue

    ChicagoBlue Godfather

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    Two different companies that have had different viewpoints on things all the time. Shouldn't DISH be concerned about carrying YES in New York? They don't, DTV does. Shouldn't DISH not allow deals like the FOX deal go on for 29 days and lose several hundred thousand customers while DTV cuts a deal before channels come down?

    There are obviously 100's of other examples. Are those not inconsistent as well?

    DTV's model of lease receiver revenue is different than DISH's. Dish has their two room receivers where one room serves two rooms and thus their revenue model on receivers is different. DTV relies on that revenue because one receiver is in each room. Different model, different reasons to protect those streams.

    As I stated earlier, you might see that DTV allows HBO GO on Roku eventually, perhaps they are just using this as a leverage tool to extract some concessions from HBO.
     
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