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DIRECTV Offers New Expanded Technology Protection Plan

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Richierich, Apr 17, 2012.

  1. hilmar2k

    hilmar2k Hall Of Fame

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    So I signed up for this yesterday. Plan covers all aspects of anything you can watch DIRECTV on. So beyond TV's and computers, A/V receivers, speakers, powered subwoofers, cabling, monitors, keyboards, mouses, and tablets are all covered. Plus, if you get the ADH add on, the screen of your smartphone is covered.

    Covers enough stuff that I own that I deemed it a good value. Plus, I have that wonky stuff I mentioned before that can now be serviced. ;)
     
  2. ATARI

    ATARI Hall Of Fame

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    Let us know what happens when you make your first damage claim on the wonky stuff.
     
  3. hilmar2k

    hilmar2k Hall Of Fame

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    Well, that'll be in 28 days. ;)
     
  4. gator1234

    gator1234 AllStar

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    I also signed up. I have used Square Trade and Mack Warranty in this past. In the long run this will be much cheaper.
     
  5. Jacob Braun

    Jacob Braun King of Awesome

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    The way it's worded I believe my 11 year old PowerBook G4 (it shipped with 10.1 or 10.2 but I have 10.5 running on it) seems to be covered in addition to my six year old MacBook running 10.7. Hrm.
     
  6. gator1234

    gator1234 AllStar

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    You would be correct.
     
  7. bikemanAMD

    bikemanAMD AllStar

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    Would my 55inch HDTV CRT be covered? or our DLP Television?

    Don't really watch much Directv on the computers at the moment, though i might when i get my faster AMD A8 APU System more often

    Model of my TV is Mitsubshi WS-55315 55 inch CRT
    Model of upstairs DLPH is WD-65731, Mitsubshi DLP 65 inch
     
  8. RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

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    Dripping...
    From what I've seen in the service coverage document they specifically mention flat panel LCD, LCE and PLASMA, no others, as being covered.
     
  9. DodgerKing

    DodgerKing Hall Of Fame

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    I read a study that listed the items of which people purchase that do not give you the best return on investment and protection plans were on the top of the list. On the average, the biggest waste of money is on protection plans in general. The average amount spent on protection plans in general is much more than the average that is spent on fixing the items.

    Let me put it this way. I have had an HR20 for I believe about 5 years now (it could be less or more). 5 x 12 x $6 = $360. I would have never come close to spending that amount to replace equipment or to get an alignment (which I never needed and I can do myself anyway).
     
  10. RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

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    Normally I agree, but for a person that has a larger the average number of devices that would be covered it might make financial sense.
     
  11. eric57

    eric57 New Member

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    I love DTV, but these plans generate revenue for them--because the plans are insurance policies. I'm not saying that the plan is worthless, but why not ensure you don't lose equipment in the first place? The plan makes DTV money because most folks protect their equipment and enough people live where lightning-induced surges are minimal.

    Anyway, the main causes of electrical equipment loss are power surges and sags. Most damage to electronic equipment--especially motors and power supplies--is due to repeated power sags and returns to normal voltage and watts levels. Sags are caused by excessive power draws to your electric grid segment. The less frequent surges can (rarely) be caused by the electricity provider but are most likely due to outside sources, like lightning or Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) from our sun.

    First, check with your utility provider to see if they have a "whole house" protection for surges. Basically, they'll just put a surge protector between the transformer line drop to your house and your circuit breakers.

    Second, to protect against surges originating from within this external protection, you can install UPS devices. I suggest using UPS instead of only surge suppressor strips because a good UPS system will also provide "line leveling" which boosts the voltage to your devices when it detects a power sag from the outlet source.

    Third, ensure your UPS system boosts electric output to the correct voltage using capacitors and not the battery. Both approaches work, but there is much more lag time using the UPS battery. Capacitors are just electrical components that can hold and release an electric charge.

    Fourth, you can attach power strips to your UPS for more available outlets--but they really should be the kind that can properly distribute power among all attached devices--even when one device turns on a motor.

    Last, if you get a lot of lightning, consider a lighting rod system to ensure lighting grounds away from your house. The setup described above may save your electronics, but it won't prevent a lightning strike to the house which could start a fire and destroy your AV stuff--or kill someone.

    Finally, I'd be remiss if I didn't further discuss Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) from our sun. These are huge charged hunks of plasma particles carrying trillions of volts, which are blown from the sun at about a million miles per hour. This plasma is usually deflected by the earth's magnetic field (responsible for the beautiful lights at our polar regions). The largest CME on record occurred in 1859, when trillions of volts made it through our magnetic field and crippled the only electronic system at the time--the telegraph. Aurora's were seen as far south as Florida. The system above can handle almost all CME events. However, a major CME could cripple satellites and electric grids. Of course, then the last thing to worry about will be our AV systems :D

    In our home, we have the power company's surge suppression, and UPSes for all computing equipment (including router, switches, broadband cable "modem"), AV equipment, and security system. None of this stuff has ever been damaged, even when neighbors lose devices during a thunderstorm.

    I know this post is long, but I thinks it's better to be proactive than reactive. Then you can better decide if there is any value regarding the protection plan, given that fixing things is a large part of it.

    No affiliation, but I recommend APC equipment--and their website has all sorts of white papers about electrical stuff and configurator tools to help you decide which devices would be best for your environment. Plus, prices are good.

    Regards, Eric.
     
  12. May 1, 2012 #112 of 178
    bungi43

    bungi43 Mentor

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    If it's not been mentioned, check with your homeowners insurance company. Some of these items (not all) may be available to add to a personal articles policy/floater...and at the cost for that much cheaper (depending on what all you want to add).


    I know with State Farm (at least in the State I write in) you can add laptops/computers at a cost of 2.20 per 100 dollars insured. No deductible and all risk perils.

    So if you only have a few items you'd want to protect, that might be a better option.
     
  13. May 7, 2012 #113 of 178
    Satelliteracer

    Satelliteracer Hall Of Fame

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    Click on the banner between channels 354 and 355. 1 minute commercial explains a bit more
     
  14. May 7, 2012 #114 of 178
    alv

    alv Godfather

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    This one price fits all policy might be a good deal for people with expensive equipment. THe flip side is people with less expensive equipment (or older stuff) would subsidize them.
     
  15. May 7, 2012 #115 of 178
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Yes it does. Why is the banner only located there?
     
  16. gator1234

    gator1234 AllStar

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    Directv advises you have to add all your equipment within 30 days of taking the service. I assume if you purchase a new item after this 30 days, you can add it if it is a covered item. In fact if you have this service you can add items a year from now. Is this correct?
     
  17. TBlazer07

    TBlazer07 Grumpy Grampy

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    I have no banner there. (HR34) :confused:
     
  18. I WANT MORE

    I WANT MORE CowboySooner

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    Nor do I. HR34.
     
  19. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Just checked both my HR24-500s. The banner between channels 354 and 355 is no longer there. It was when I posted on 7 May 12.
     
  20. hilmar2k

    hilmar2k Hall Of Fame

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    I was originally told that all existing equipment needed to be added within 30 days, and new equipment can be added as it's purchased. However, I had some other reason to be on the phone with them, and asked about that and was told that anything can be added at any time.

    To be safe, however, I got all of my existing stuff added within that first 30 day window.
     

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