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DIRECTV Plans Online Services

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Athlon646464, Sep 27, 2013.

  1. Athlon646464

    Athlon646464 Gold Members DBSTalk Gold Club

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    DIRECTV Plans Online Services

    Recently, DIRECTV, the largest satellite TV operator in the U.S., has indicated that it might introduce online video streaming services.

    However, the initial offering will be at a much smaller scale than the existing service providers Netflix, Hulu and YouTube.

    Initially, the company will offer this service for selected contents.

    Full Story Here

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Tubaman-Z

    Tubaman-Z Godfather

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    When I can cancel the satellite service but keep D* for streaming and they are cost competitive with Netflix - let's talk.
     
  3. tonyd79

    tonyd79 Hall Of Fame

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    Nowhere near enough information in that article to comment on. What type of services? Movies and On Demand content like Netflix and/or live streaming? Is this expanding out their existing structure for things like Audience to other channels or a subset that aims at Netflix and Amazon Prime?

    If they are talking taking what they can do in your local LAN out to the world, then that is something. If movies and on demand only (a la Netflix), there are so many in that field now (Target just joined) that it is a waste of time to try and sort them out.
     
  4. Athlon646464

    Athlon646464 Gold Members DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Some sort of bundle would make sense. Convenient for subs, and could keep folks from migrating away.
     
  5. jerrylove56

    jerrylove56 Godfather

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    DTV strategy to obtain a streaming option to stop customer lost doesn't seem practical. Netflix charges $ 8.00 a month for a handful of new movies and lots of reruns of US and Brit shows, how does DTV think they can get rich on that.
     
  6. synpse

    synpse Cool Member

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    makes me think of Xfinity online
     
  7. Satelliteracer

    Satelliteracer Hall Of Fame

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    Netflix sure isn't. Barely making a profit.
     
  8. Athlon646464

    Athlon646464 Gold Members DBSTalk Gold Club

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    I'm thinking it's more about churn than profits, of course in the end less churn equals more profits. D* needs a streaming service to keep cord cutters from leaving. Some analysts say sat/cable providers have reached their peak in the U.S. in terms of numbers of subs.

    D* can't do something like a 'triple play' to keep subs in house, but streaming as an added value might.

    They already have relationships with content providers that can be leveraged for content for such a service.
     
  9. Drucifer

    Drucifer New Member

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    It's about keeping their customers on DirecTV instead of using another service. Kinda like a supermarket that has a pharmacy and a hardware dept. in it. Hell my supermarket has even started selling big screen TVs.
     
  10. Athlon646464

    Athlon646464 Gold Members DBSTalk Gold Club

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    ^^^

    Didn't you just re-word what I said?
     
  11. Drucifer

    Drucifer New Member

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    NY Hudson...
    But with an visual image most of us are familiar with.
     
  12. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    A year or more ago, I happened to see a bunch of icons on one of the screens. Don't remember which one, but it had something to do with the Guide Options box. One of the icons looked like a NetFlix icon. I posted about it and was told that D* would never have such a thing. And here we are. I could never get that to come up again, but I was pretty sure I saw that NF icon.

    Rich
     
  13. SledgeHammer

    SledgeHammer Icon

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    Its likely to be priced absurdly expensive. You know... going by $7.99 for a 1.5hr HD PPV movie and $20 for an hour of softcore porn. Just sayin'.
     
  14. acostapimps

    acostapimps Hall Of Famer

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    If Directv can make an app for in home live streaming of a few channels, I don't see why not out of home live stream not tied to your home network, They need to start thinking outside the box, and cut down on restrictions with viewing recordings, Make it a truly Directv Everywhere. online streaming is nice but seriously work on what they have and capable of doing, Just my 2 cents.
     
  15. jerrylove56

    jerrylove56 Godfather

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    Just thinking, and maybe someone else has already made this comment, but this seems to be connected to Goggles interest in the NFL ST package. Perhaps DTV needs its own streaming option to prevent losing parts or all of the ST to a competitor. With that in mind now it makes sense all of the interest in Hulu.
     
  16. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    Maybe also because the nfl has made threats to leave broadcast tv. That would have to have an effect, and they wanting to expand Thursday night football.

    Sent from my Z10 using DBSTalk mobile app
     
  17. Drucifer

    Drucifer New Member

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    NY Hudson...
    Televisions today need more than just access to broadcasts. Internet, home security, video communications, just to name a few.

    The method of how is the game everyone is trying to get into. And this includes DirecTV.
     
  18. peds48

    peds48 DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

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    anything that involves more than plugin in to an electric outlet is not going to fly.
     
  19. Diana C

    Diana C Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    I think Google and Roku are heading in the right direction with small devices that plug into the TV. The problem with "smart" TVs is that the lifespan of a TV is too long. There is no way that 2013 TV will be feature competitive with a 2023 TV, no matter how many software updates the manufacturer puts out. Having streaming and other functions on a "stick" that plugs into the TV makes more sense...it can be upgraded and replaced at far lower cost.

    Linear broadcast TV will not be totally replaced by on-demand streaming alternatives, anymore than MP3 players have replaced radio (in fact, Pandora and iTunes Radio are replicating linear broadcast of music). Video is clearly heading in the same direction. Viewers want the option to watch what they want to see on their own schedules. This is what lead the popularity of DVR technology. Eventually, virtually every program will be available on-demand, just as today you can hear virtually any piece of music whenever you want it. The big money will go to the people that figure out how to package such an offering, pricing it at an attractive price point and still be able to make money. The biggest obstacle at the moment is that to get anything approaching "full" access to content you need to subscribe to Netflix, Hulu Plus, have Amazon and Vudu accounts, and still subscribe to a service that includes access to broadcast TV, HBO, Showtime and a few other linear channels (if for no other reason than to allow you access to the channels' online service).

    If somebody manages to offer access to all the major broadcast and cable networks' libraries (and these libraries are truly robust) for something like $50/month, with no traditional cable or satellite subscriptions required, they will clean up. Without the need to build a distribution network (since it will be delivered over the internet), it should be possible to make a profit at around that price point. The content could even be tiered, with recent movies and premium content in a higher tier, or on a PPV basis. But effectively, you'll have eliminated the need for cable or satellite, and DVRs, with a service that delivers whatever you want, where and when you want it, on almost any viewing device with an internet connection.
     
  20. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    That'd work for the populous areas of the country, but there are still many who do not have the bandwidth to support either the speed or capacity needed for such.
     

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