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DirecTV PQ questions recent installation done

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Nocturnal, Oct 3, 2010.

  1. Oct 3, 2010 #1 of 19
    Nocturnal

    Nocturnal New Member

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    I just got DirecTV installed this past Tuesday. I have the HR24 HD DVR connected to a Vizio SV370XVT via HDMI.

    As I watch HD channels I notice that they don't appear that great. I have some pictures I took with my Panasonic LX3 camera. I am not sure if this helps at all.

    Another thing is my signals to the 99c satellite are all in the 70s with some in 69.

    Here are some screen shots.

    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Is this decent quality? Do you think my signal to the 99c satellite is affecting the PQ? I sit roughly 2 ft. away from the television set as it's near my computer monitors. Thanks in advance :)
     
  2. Oct 3, 2010 #2 of 19
    Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    Press the FORMAT button on the remote and make sure you are not stuck on 480.
    You need to go into setup, and select the resolutions your TV accepts, or the DVR will just output 480.
     
  3. Oct 3, 2010 #3 of 19
    Nocturnal

    Nocturnal New Member

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    Sorry I forgot to mention that I already did that and made it so that it only shows 720p and 1080i/1080p.
     
  4. Oct 3, 2010 #4 of 19
    Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    Well, if the format is showing it is outputting 720p or 1080i, and you are using HDMI, then you will have to modify the PQ with your monitor. It may still be set to defaults, i.e. sharpness turned up to high, brightness to high, etc. The 69-70 signal is a bit low for a new install (shouldnt have passed the QC tests) but wont affect the picture. It will cause you to lose the signal a little faster during a rainstorm.
     
  5. Oct 3, 2010 #5 of 19
    Kevin F

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    Fox is notorious for using 720p which is not very good for sports. CBS is better for that because they use 1080i. If you want me to explain more I can.
     
  6. Oct 3, 2010 #6 of 19
    dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    I thought it was the opposite, 720p better for fast action, and that was why ESPN uses 720p.
     
  7. Oct 3, 2010 #7 of 19
    Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    Guess it depends on whether you want a somewhat blurry picture without motion artifacts or a sharp picture with some motion artifacts...
     
  8. Oct 3, 2010 #8 of 19
    Kevin F

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    720p is better for action but terrible for detail.
     
  9. Oct 4, 2010 #9 of 19
    johns70

    johns70 Legend

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    Signal strengths don't have anything to do with picture quality.

    It's on, or it gets pixelated, or it's black. Lower signal strength doesn't mean lower and lower picture quality.
     
  10. CCarncross

    CCarncross Hall Of Fame

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    If you have a picture, without breakups, then a signal strength of 60 or higher will look identical to one of 90 or higher, this is digital, not analog...signal strength does not affect PQ unless the signal actually starts to break up.
     
  11. Dazed & Confused

    Dazed & Confused Godfather

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    So which is it?:lol:
     
  12. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    All broadcast HD, including OTA, is heavily compressed. Heck, even Blu-Ray is heavily compressed, and in all cases, "lossy" compression is used.

    BUT... the compression algorythms are good enough that with reasonably high bitrates, you can rarely tell the difference between the raw video and the compressed video. Blu-Ray, using MPEG4 (AVC/h.284) compression, with its ability to sustain 40 Mb/s and burst up to 50 Mb/s, looks fantastic.

    The broadcasters could use high bitrates like Blu-Ray, but they'd have to reduce their channel count by about 75%. Since everyone wants as much HD as they can get, the broadcasters are forced to squeeze their bitrates much lower, well into the range where PQ is affected. And while they all work hard to balance out their encoders' settings to minimize the effects on the PQ, there's only so much they can do.

    Every broadcaster makes different trade-offs. Some may lower the native resolution, or lose a bit more color depth, or a bit more contrast level, or allow more macroblocking. None are perfect, but some are perceivably better than others, at least by discriminating viewers.

    In the end, you can control your provider, but not the various sourced that they get their content from, and that's another big factor. You could have the best system, but if you're watching a show that uses lousy cameras or poor production, it may still look bad.

    Many networks are very aware that they have issues, and are working on them, but many of those problems require lots of money to fix, and like everywhere else, money is tight.

    Just be happy that you have lots of HD available. You could still be stuck with SD...
     
  13. Surveyor40

    Surveyor40 DBSTalk Club Member

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    As Davenlr suggested have you attempted to adjust the picture & digital mode settings on your TV? I would suggest turning off any digital processing, noise cancellation, mpeg correction, etc in the picture menu of the TV. If these settings are on, they tend to make the picture quality even worse. Visit Cnet and AVSforums to find calibration settings for color, brightness etc posted from other Visio SV370 owners. By making some fine adjustments to your TV settings you may find the picture quality more to your liking - even with the broadcast resolution limitations.
     
  14. tonyd79

    tonyd79 Hall Of Fame

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    You can make those claims and yet the OP is complaining about PQ with three of his pictures being the supposedly superior CBS.

    As to the original question. Make sure your TV thinks it is seeing 720 or 1080. That is the real test for the settings being correct.

    How are your non-local channels? Locals could have an issue.

    Hard to judge PQ from a photo.

    Oh. And it may be silly but make sure you are watching HD. I do not see any logos on your pictures. SD and HD channels are on the same numbers and either can be hidden by setups.
     
  15. guffy1

    guffy1 Legend

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    Its neither..lol

    720p can look every bit as sharp, detailed and jaw dropping as 1080i when done properly. There are so many factors within the distribution chain that come into play when it comes to HD PQ. 720p vs 1080i really isn't of them in my book. That's just a stale and really old myth that's embraced by rookies...lol
     
  16. Nocturnal

    Nocturnal New Member

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    My TV is a 37" TV and I'm watching from 2.5ft away -- could this have any effect on the PQ?
     
  17. CCarncross

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    Yes, 2.5ft away from any size tv is just too close. Have you always watched from 2.5ft away?
     
  18. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I don't see any of that on my plasma TVs. Perhaps you only see them on LCDs? Never had one (well, I had a Vizio and a Sammy LCD for a couple hours and took them right back to the store).

    I did see major differences in PQ until the BRIIPS were cured and now I get a pretty good picture on Fox and ABC.

    Rich
     
  19. Manctech

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    720p is better for fast moving action movies/sports. ESPN only broadcasts in 720p.

    To confirm, just set your receiver to Native -> ON.

    It will auto adjust the resolution to whatever the show was filmed in. ESPN is always 720p.

    Progressive means that each line is painted starting at the top to the bottom. Once it reaches the bottom it starts over at the top.

    Interlaced means that it paints half the lines, in half a second left to right, then the other half in half a second going right to left. This does not refresh as fast as progressive and therefore causes more artifacts with faster moving objects.
     

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