1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

DirecTV to offer Broadband and VoIP services

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by cforrest, Aug 15, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. MikeR

    MikeR Hall Of Fame

    1,157
    0
    Oct 5, 2006
    +1. Just do a quick google and see the hits with Amateur Radio BPL. It appears that Current Group is one of the few (only?) that is being proactive and meeting with Amateur Radio groups.

    Found this presentation from the Current group. It appears they may have touting their success eliminating the interference issue. (Page 8)

    Current avoids issues by using low-band VHF (30-50 MHz) instead

    Current Group also sells "smart monitoring" equipment that is their entry into using the powerline.

    from another article
    this comment From the trials in Cincinnati (Dec '05)

    DS2 is the leading equipment supplier, providing 200mbps modems for the backbone.

    White paper- Broadband technology overview from Corning ('05) - they love fiber;)...with good reason.

    Edit: State of NJ BPL White Paper

    from reading the NJ paper...looks like Wi-Max could be implemented in the last mile, particularly attractive (read: $$) in rural markets.
     
  2. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

    21,192
    182
    Jun 14, 2003
    Salem, OR
    And after it was DirecWay, it became HughesNet.
     
  3. Spanky_Partain

    Spanky_Partain Active Member

    5,500
    0
    Dec 7, 2006
    Sure hope it comes to the Austin area as well.
     
  4. spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone

    12,561
    61
    Nov 16, 2005
    Wylie, Texas
    Wonder how far out in DFW their abilities reach? Entire DMA or just the basic Dallas and Ft. Worth areas?
     
  5. Bijou Media

    Bijou Media Mentor

    47
    0
    Jul 28, 2007
    What will happen with D* s deal with the telocos? Just curious I know it's only one DMA, but if profitable they will be looking to move into other markets quickly.
     
  6. Meklos

    Meklos Legend in his own mind...

    324
    0
    Nov 7, 2006
    What is the definition of a transmitting antenna? RF energy at 'some' frequency fed into the end of one or more unshielded, unbalanced wires of sufficient length (related to the frequency).

    What is BPL? Feeding data via an RF signal over various frequencies across (long, unshielded) power lines.


    From an RF perspective, BPL is basically an RF transmitter that transmits digital signals (viewed as noise from those who do not want to receive it) utilizing frequencies that they do not have 'license' to broadcast on. Cable systems use some of the same frequencies... except their systems are shielded so as not to let any RF energy be transmitted from their systems. They are required to keep RF from transmitting out of their lines.

    Power companies are currently being given a pass to broadcast 'trash' across vast swaths of frequency ranges, including military, public service (fire, police, etc), weather service, amateur radio, FAA air coordination, commercial, international short-wave and others. Anyone who is authorized by the FCC to be on these frequencies will find themselves partially or totally unable to communicate once these systems are turned on. And yes, there are mechanisms by which they can have the system 'not' transmit on certain frequencies to try to limit the interference, but it does not eliminate it.

    If BPL is sending data, it is radiating that data as an RF transmission. Whatever frequency is being used by BPL will be trashed by it. Cutting certain frequency ranges out of the system lowers the overall data rate of the system (since you can transmit more data if you have more frequency range available to you, thus a 'wider' signal). So it isn't 'eliminating' the interference, it's just picking and choosing who to interfere with.

    And no, there are *no* "unused" ranges of frequencies, even up to 300 GHz. In addition, many of the frequencies used (those below about 30Mhz) are frequencies capable of going all around the world on very low (1-5 watt) power levels. These frequencies are not 'owned' by anyone, but are part of international treaties negotiated to keep the radio world from being an unusable chaos of jamming and noise.

    I sincerely suspect that if the frequencies being used by these systems were in the same range as the downlinks from the satellites used by D*, and if the downlinks were being interfered with by RF radiating from house wiring from every house attached to the power company (not just every house that actually receives service), then D* would be first in line saying "No Way!!" to BPL.

    But they're not being interfered with, so I guess it's fair game. But the next time your police or fire department isn't able to communicate due to all the noise on the frequencies they use, just sit back and enjoy that high-speed BPL connection.

    For those that are interested, here is a link to an archive of test results from live BPL systems, showing exactly what the noise sounds like, how badly it creates interference, how far from the power line the noise travels, and what kind of effect it could have on anyone who uses radio signals in the range they use. The FCC has gotten caught breaking their own rules when it comes to BPL, and they've been brought before a judge to defend their actions. They're sticking their head in the sand, saying that it either doesn't cause interference, or it doesn't cause "that much" interference. They're changing the method by which they measure the interference, and completely ignoring actual recorded evidence that has been presented to them of live interference from BPL systems.
     
  7. mtnagel

    mtnagel Hall Of Fame

    2,019
    0
    Sep 18, 2006
    Yep, I remember seeing something about this at least 5 years ago in just a couple neighborhoods. You'd figure in that long they'd be in most of Cincy, but I just checked my address and it's not yet available! And I'm not too far outside of the city.
     
  8. paulman182

    paulman182 Hall Of Fame

    4,839
    3
    Aug 4, 2006
    Meklos, what a great description of the situation.

    BPL is failing in the locations where it is being tried. It is a good example of how hype can drive an inferior product, but even the false momentum created by the FCC cheerleaders will eventually run out under real-world conditions.

    Let us also not forget, the services with which BPL interferes, will also interfere with BPL.
     
  9. jwd45244

    jwd45244 Hall Of Fame

    1,510
    0
    Aug 18, 2006
    While I cannot comment on people and areas where BPL has failed or is failing. In the Cincinnati limited roll-out, it is a complete success, the customers that have it love it and would not go back. I don't know what the roll out here is doing but the HAM operators and others in Cincinnati are satisfied that BPL is not a problem here.

    The problem here is that the power company that started it: Cinergy was purchased by Duke Energy and Duke has not said one way or the other abut plans to continue the roll out.
     
  10. Meklos

    Meklos Legend in his own mind...

    324
    0
    Nov 7, 2006
    Very true about the Cincinnati rollout. It appears there are several different technologies related to BPL, and they act very very differently with respect to RF.

    A good brief explanation of the ARRL (ham radio) position is outlined here. It appears that they aren't using the long medium-voltage wires to transmit the data, and so the 'antenna' portion of the system is much smaller. Also it appears they only use a limited amount of frequency space on the very end of the line to feed the house instead of lots of frequency space to feed the neighborhood.
     
  11. MikeR

    MikeR Hall Of Fame

    1,157
    0
    Oct 5, 2006

    see post from "W1RFI" from the AARL


    Edit:
    Couple of other articles.....Google push

    Sprint WiMax now Xohm
     
  12. MikeR

    MikeR Hall Of Fame

    1,157
    0
    Oct 5, 2006

    CURRENT Communications Group, LLC was founded by Liberty Associated Partners, L.P., an investment partnership managed by principals with extensive investment and operating experience in telecommunications, media, Internet and related technologies. Through Associated Group, LLC, these principals, along with Liberty Media Corporation (NYSE: L), are the primary investors in Liberty Associated Partners. CURRENT is also backed by Duke Energy (NYSE: DUK), EarthLink, Inc. (NASDAQ: ELNK), EnerTech Capital, General Electric Co. (NYSE:GE), Google Inc. (NASDAQ: GOOG), Goldman Sachs & Co., The Hearst Corporation, Sensus Metering Systems (Bermuda 1) Ltd., and TXU Corp. (NYSE: TXU).
     
  13. jwd45244

    jwd45244 Hall Of Fame

    1,510
    0
    Aug 18, 2006
    Yep, Current is backed by Duke cause Duke bought Cinergy and Cinergy backed Current. There has been nothing from Duke about current in a long time. I am a Duke customer and they have not gone beyond the few areas in over 2 years.
     
  14. MikeR

    MikeR Hall Of Fame

    1,157
    0
    Oct 5, 2006
    I see.

    Looks like Duke has partnered with Ambient in other areas, which may explain some of the delay in the Cinergy legacy areas.
     
  15. chicagojim

    chicagojim Legend

    231
    1
    Sep 13, 2006
    Will be around $225 with internet and VoIP?

    Wow - that's the biggest vendor I'll have next to my mortgage! :lol:
     
  16. doodlemebug

    doodlemebug Duplicate User (Account Closed)

    11
    0
    Aug 31, 2007
    problem with this, look in california, the heat has taxed the power grid so much, parts are shutting down and the whole nations power grid has been rated a "D"

    so how do they expect for us to accept internet and VOIP phone over a power grid that is inqdequate even for just our nations power needs ?
     
  17. doodlemebug

    doodlemebug Duplicate User (Account Closed)

    11
    0
    Aug 31, 2007
    anybody have comment on those issues ?
     
  18. Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

    30,092
    3
    Nov 15, 2005
    You are not "forced" to accept anything...

    It is just a service that you are being offered... you can use any other options for your phone and your broadband.
     
  19. rkjg24

    rkjg24 Legend

    133
    0
    Apr 23, 2007
    this is actually another internet service DTV is trying to produce. They also have partnered with Earthlink in Anaheim, New Orleans, and Philadelphia for WiFi service.

    Also, D* is getting back into the satellite internet business.
     
  20. Brandon428

    Brandon428 Hall Of Fame

    1,129
    1
    Mar 21, 2007
    WiFi and VOIP is a good idea but Satellite internet isn't a good investment at all. FAP and latency alone kill it. Not even mentioning no service during a storm. Wifi on the other hand sounds like a great idea. I think I should buy up some stock with D* it looks like their making their way to front of the line here. ;)
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page