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Directv via a hotel sd tv's internal tuner

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by ciurca, Apr 30, 2010.

  1. ciurca

    ciurca Godfather

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    Apr 14, 2009
    I was recently at a hotel, and I'm sure I was watching Directv via the hotel's sd tv tuner. There were Directv screen savers on a channel that was not broadcasting.

    Is this common? How do they convert to the NTSC tuner (I think that is what it is)
     
  2. Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

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    I've seen this frequently in hotels in Las Vegas. I can only presume they have a bank of D11 or D12 type receivers hooked to RF modulators.
     
  3. ciurca

    ciurca Godfather

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    FWIW, channel changing was as fast as with cable tv. Of course, I spent most of the free time at the hotel that night looking for a dish and a wiring closet.
     
  4. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    That's called a Head-End system, being fed with DirecTV receivers. I install these using both DirecTV and DishNetwork.

    [​IMG]

    This is a 36-channel system with 35 D12s and a combo DVD/VCR feeding the 36th channel. This is for a convelescent hospital. This pic was taken as the system was near completion; a system monitor TV is on the open shelf on the right, and we did some further cable neatening.

    Here's a Dish-based head-end for an office building:

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

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    The channel changing was fast because it was all pre-modulated. Each receiver is tuned to one channel 24x7 and the whole thing is translated to essentially basic cable.
     
  6. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    Correct. It's just a simplified version of what your local cable company has in their office, to take signals from various sources and assign each one to a cable channel.
     
  7. Valve1138

    Valve1138 Legend

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    My college had one of these setups installed back in the day. DirecTV as the source.

    It was so much better than the antenna/c-band dish combo they had been using.
     
  8. Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

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    I'm guessing that day was at least 15 years after I left college, as DBS hadn't been invented yet when I was there. We didn't even have cable. I got one channel in my room.
     
  9. 2dogz

    2dogz Godfather

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    Do I assume correctly that they have HD versions of these head-in setups by now?

    Also, what are the power requirements of say that three rack setup in the first picture above?

    Knew they existed, thanks for the pictures.
     
  10. ndole

    ndole Problem Solver

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    Old fart! :lol:
     
  11. robq391

    robq391 Legend

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    Nov 6, 2007


    1.21 gigawatts :lol:
     
  12. Valve1138

    Valve1138 Legend

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    Stuart, This was in '98 or '99
     
  13. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    ATSC modulators exist in the commercial world but are very expensive.

    Each receiver draws about 24 watts peak. I would expect the modulators are in the same general area. So round it off to 50 watts per channel. For 35 channels that would be 1750 watts.
     
  14. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    Yes, they do, but they cost 10 times as much and require certain models of TVs that will accept a Pro-Idiom decryption module. The Pro-Idiom headend RF is encrypted QAM and requires the module in the TV to work. Content providers will not allow unencrpyted QAM.

    Roughly 10-11 amps. I require a dedicated 15 amp circuit for the system.
     
  15. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    [​IMG]

    Here's a 49-channel system (48 sat channels plus a DVD player). 20 amp circuit for this one.
     
  16. bb37

    bb37 Godfather

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    I did some work in a hospital in Terre Haute, Indiana, over the winter that had a set-up that looked just like that. The hospital has over 200 patient rooms. My company was the temperature controls contractor and the satellite guys kept complaining about it being too hot in the IT closet where their rack was located. This was before the air handlers were running reliably and before our system had been checked out. I had to explain to the satellite guys that no air meant no cooling. It's a simple concept.

    If that rack is burning 10-11 amps in a room that's roughly 10 feet by 5 feet, it's gonna get warm in there.
     
  17. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    You bet. My bids always include a number of disclaimers, and one of those is that additional room cooling is strongly recommended and is not included or provided by me.
     
  18. TheRatPatrol

    TheRatPatrol Hall Of Fame

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    Just curious, if thats the case, would it be any cheaper to just put an HD receiver in every room?
     
  19. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    These are custom installs for a reason; every one is different. But for most commercial installs, you wouldn't want to put a receiver in a guest's room. They'd be stolen, damaged, have their access cards removed, etc. They'd need to be locked up in metal lock boxes or something. And if the number of rooms was large, it would be too costly anyway.

    A Pro-Idiom system is expensive but doable IF you haven't already bought a bunch of non-compatible HDTVs. But what happens is that a hotel/motel will decide to buy new TVs, and so they buy 200 40" HDTVs and get them installed, and hook them up to the SD headend system that looked fine on the 20" CRTs they used to have.

    Naturally, the same signal looks like crap on the new HDTVs, and guests complain, so the management starts calling around trying to find out about HDTV. Then you explain that HDTV has lots of additional requirements, and that their brand new TVs aren't compatible with Pro-Idiom, and right there, most customers hang up and decide to stick with their old SD head-end.

    http://www.lgcommercial.com/proidiom/
     
  20. bb37

    bb37 Godfather

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    And how many times do you think that disclaimer gets back to the consulting mechanical engineer who designed the HVAC system? It takes a pretty sharp engineer to see loads that will increase two years after he designed the building. Of course, that's why we get change orders.

    You might be interested to know that we put wireless thermostats in this hospital using the ZigBee protocol. Our channels fit in the spaces between Wi-Fi channels.
     

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