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DirecTV will sell HR 44s to Solid Signal and Weaknees - but not me

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by FarNorth, May 29, 2013.

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  1. May 30, 2013 #81 of 263
    gio12

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  2. May 30, 2013 #82 of 263
    gio12

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    You just showed compliment ignorance. Whats NOT serviceable on a iPhone? Nothing obsolete about a S2 even though Samscum and Google do screw you! Know who many iPhone 3GS and iPhone 4 users are out there and happy?
    Man you guys crack me up!
     
  3. May 30, 2013 #83 of 263
    gio12

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    And ALL those prices have come down over the years. an iPhone 5 cost around $183 and I would bet an HR44 around $300-350 max! DIRECTV is making money on their $199 lease deals with a 2 year contact.
     
  4. May 30, 2013 #84 of 263
    bobcamp1

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    The first part I have addressed on previous projects by buying the unique parts for the manufacturers. This enables me to get volume pricing on those parts. But D*'s volume is still really high, even when it's divided across 3 or 4 mfrs., so it may not even be necessary for them to do that. There's only one "unique" expensive part -- the main chip.

    I agree with the second part, which is why I like FIOS's option of paying a one-time fee to be considered a "premiere" customer. That takes care of the people who DO care, which you have to address because they are also the most vocal. But by charging extra, it discourages the average Joe from demanding a new receiver just because they can.
     
  5. May 30, 2013 #85 of 263
    Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

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    Somehow I don't understand how making money is an issue. DIRECTV is first recouping their costs and then, yes, probably making money.
     
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  6. May 30, 2013 #86 of 263
    bobcamp1

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    Nothing is really serviceable on a cell phone except the display. It costs more to troubleshoot the phone and repair the defective part than it does to throw out the whole phone and replace it.

    Prices have come down, and do in general for electronics, but you're quoting the subsidized price for an iPhone 5. I agree that prices for the DVRs have never come down, which is rather odd, because if the HR21 has gotten cheaper to make and/or has depreciated, why doesn't D* share that savings with their customers? To be fair, their competitors do it too. But it's still very shady.
     
  7. May 30, 2013 #87 of 263
    gio12

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    I have no problem with them making money on these boxes and never said that. But to claim it cost them $700 a box is crazy. Or saying they are losing money at $199.
    Not my point. Stuart was mention how much they use to cost and I said they cost less nowadays and DIRECTV is making money on them now.

    So yes, making money and locking you into 2 years at the same time. Never said its a bad thing or wrong.
     
  8. May 30, 2013 #88 of 263
    gio12

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    What? Are you nuts? I have replaced glass, home buttons, batteries, etc on iPhones and others, but thanks for playing. Hmm, $45 home button repair out of warranty or $649 new phone.


    Nope, the cost for APPLE to make an iphone is $189. they sell them to a large carrier in the $600 range. then you pay $199 to get locked into a 2 yr contract but you OWN the phone, unlike DIRECTV.

    Please guys, dont argue a point unless you KNOW what your talking about.


    EDIT: I will agree it's a bit Shady on DIRECTV and Disk's part, but they are a duopoly and can get away with it. The saving should be passed on when these are leased and they tech is no longer new.
     
  9. May 30, 2013 #89 of 263
    unixguru

    unixguru Godfather

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    Cell companies are far from perfect.

    However, if I had an iPhone 5 that I got last summer and they come out with a 5S or 6 this summer and I wanted to upgrade they WILL let me do that if I pay the ETF. Not saying it's cost effective but it IS doable and relatively easy.

    I have an HR34 that I got last summer. IF I badly wanted an HR44 could I get one? Not without canceling service, paying ETF, returning everything, wait awhile and resubscribe (probably having to do it through SS to make sure I get an HR44).

    It's all relative and DirecTV is worse.

    We have 2 iPhone's that went out of contract with AT&T. Unlocking them was trivial (yeh, after April 2012). Still on AT&T network via AirVoice. I own the phone even though AT&T subsidized it (which is really a farce because they just financed it by charging me every month).
     
  10. May 30, 2013 #90 of 263
    gio12

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    Yep and at least AT&T will let you upgrade after 18 months and you get to KEEP the old phone. That whole business about unlocking is a load of CRAP!

    Summer of 2011 I had an iPhone 4 and traveled to Costa Rica. I asked AT&T to unlock it so i could use a local SIM. I had 6 months left on my contract and AT&T unlocked it. No questions asked as said I was an outstanding and loyal customer.
     
  11. May 30, 2013 #91 of 263
    unixguru

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    A DVR is only slightly more serviceable. Power supply, disk drive, and logic board. I doubt they service anything other than a power supply or disk drive.

    They don't service anything on a logic board - just like a cell phone or notebook computer or tablet.

    People repairing commodity electronics are far too expensive to spend much if any time on them.

    That is why a flaky logic board can be marked as good and put back into the spares pile. Problems aren't always black and white.
     
  12. May 30, 2013 #92 of 263
    rrbhokies

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    So if I pay $299 and buy an HR44 from Weaknees, I can add the HR44 along with my existing HR34 and have two genies, and I don't have to extend my contract at all. But it won't be covered under any protection plan so if it breaks, I'm out, correct? Yet, if I call Directv, they won't let me have a 2nd Genie anyways, so the only way is to go through weaknees, correct? What about installation? Do they just ship you the HR44 and you install it yourself? Directv will just let me authorize it when I call? As for warranty, I guess if I pay with my Amex card, it would be covered for a year by Amex. Am I missing anything?
     
  13. May 30, 2013 #93 of 263
    sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    You can't have 2 Genies.
     
  14. May 30, 2013 #94 of 263
    Blurayfan

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    DirecTV won't activate a second Genie no matter where you purchase from, yet anyway.
     
  15. May 30, 2013 #95 of 263
    Sixto

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    You most likely will not be able to activate that 2nd Genie. Beware.
     
  16. May 30, 2013 #96 of 263
    FarNorth

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    FWIW, I destroyed my 4 month old iPhone 5 when it was caught in the mechanism of my recliner. A T & T sold me a replacement for $650, still have a year and a half on my service contract.
     
  17. May 30, 2013 #97 of 263
    Jacob Braun

    Jacob Braun King of Awesome

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    You're missing everything here. If you pay $299 to buy an HR44 from Weaknees you would need to deactivate your HR34 before you could activate the HR44 (even if you found someone who would try to activate a 2nd Genie on your account the system wouldn't activate it).
    The HR44 would start a new two year agreement. Weaknees would ship it to you and you would self install it. As for a warranty you have a full 90 day warranty on it from DirecTV. Outside of the 90 days if you do not have the Protection Plan it would be $19.95 for s/h of a replacement. If you do have the Protection Plan the HR44 would be covered with it.
     
  18. May 30, 2013 #98 of 263
    slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    I don't buy that. Yeah, the power supplies and various other bits are different between the different manufacturers, but that is virtually certain to make them cost less, not more. Do you really think that a manufacturer the size of Samsung or Pace is creating a unique power supply that they only use for a particular model of receiver? Or are they re-using an identical (or nearly identical, with a few components switched to get the amount of power they design calls for) power supply used in other products? I'll bet if you tear open a receiver made by Pace, and one of the many cable receivers and DVRs Pace makes, you'll see a ton of the same components. They chose differently from what Samsung might choose because they're choosing the components they already buy a lot of.

    I still think the satellite tuner is the only non mass market bit of hardware in the entire product, whether you're talking H2x receiver, Cx1 client, HR2x DVR or HRx4 Genie. Everything else is a commodity off the shelf part. It doesn't matter if the production of the HR44 is split between three manufacturers and they aren't making them all with the same components. If Directv gave them a reference design and required them to use identical components, they'd end up costing more because the components Directv required wouldn't necessarily be the ones that manufacturer has volume pricing on due to their use in other hardware they make.

    Not to mention the risk of big problems if their reference design included something like the H20-600's power supply. The fact Directv had two manufacturers of the H20 using different components turned out to be a good thing, since the H20-100 didn't suffer from the problems the -600 did.
     
  19. May 30, 2013 #99 of 263
    Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

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    I tend to think that most of the hardware inside is relatively low-volume, from the tuners to the decoder chips to the CPU. None of it has a place in an average PC. Think of it this way... A good graphics card can run you $500... so can a cheap PC. Why? Volume.

    I will say that all the models of HR44 use the same power supply, unlike other models, and it isn't a terribly expensive one.
     
  20. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    The CPUs used in the receivers are not going to be specially made for Directv. You can probably find them in some outdated Android phones, or wireless routers, or smart TVs, and so on. Compared to the consumer electronics market as whole, PCs are a niche market. The PC market is outsold on a unit and dollar basis by cell phones alone, by quite a wide margin. Don't think that the PC market is the only place where Directv receivers are getting its components, or that it is the place with the most cutthroat margins.

    I stand by my statement that there is unlikely to be anything unique to a Directv receiver aside from the satellite tuner. If you think otherwise, point to a part number on a component and let's see how many different products Google can turn up that uses it. If it is used in a product that gets a 'teardown', we might even be able to get an estimate of its pricing (at least at the time the teardown was done)

    BTW, the reason the top graphics card costs $500+ is twofold. In order to get maximum performance they use one extremely large chip - typically nearly as big as it is possible to make a single chip. About 4-10x as large as the Intel CPU in a typical PC. The larger the chip, the more likely there are defects on it that cause it to be unusable, thus the cost shoots up the bigger the chip because a lot of the ones they produce are defective. Two, they charge what the market will bear, and as long as there is a segment of hardcore gamers, the market will continue the bear the prices they charge. Yes, they are low volume, but the high price is just as responsible for the low volume as the low volume is responsible for the price.
     
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