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DirecTV with a Generator

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by llupin, Oct 29, 2012.

  1. Dec 8, 2012 #241 of 369
    sbl

    sbl Icon DBSTalk Club

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    I fitted the GenTent on my Briggs+Stratton today. Very nice design.
     
  2. Dec 8, 2012 #242 of 369
    Sixto

    Sixto Well-Known Member

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    Leaning towards TED 5000-G. Just also found a few great looking iPhone Apps for TED.

    And convinced of portable inverter generator more then ever now. Also added one more item to my pro's column ... thinking it's much better to be able to store a portable unit in the garage and keep it out of the weather while not in use, vs whole house standby that will get weathered over the years.

    Purchase list:
    1. Portable Invertor Generator
    2. Tri-Fuel Kit
    3. GenTent or build some cover off house
    4. 4 prong 240v electric cable for generator to inlet port
    5. 4-prong 30A inlet port (backyard wall)
    6. 10-guage wire from inlet port to electric panel
    7. 30A backfeed circuit breaker (takes up two slots)
    8. InterLock Kit for electric panel
    9. Natural gas line outside - piping & gas port (backyard wall)
    10. Natural gas hose for generator to gas connector
    11. Possible gas meter upgrade
    Portable Inverter with Tri-Fuel connector - Pro's:
    • Small
    • Quiet (50-60db)
    • Clean power (UPS' will be fine)
    • Easy maintenance, no need for generator home maintenance contract
    • When used with InterLock Kit, should be able to power all of the essentials in the house with no extension cords
    • Natural gas, no need for gasoline if gasoline is constrained, but also still could be powered by gasoline or propane in case of a natural disaster that disables the natural gas line
    • Portable, can be stored in the garage and protected from weather when not in use
    • Portable, can take with me if ever I move, and no need to permanently connect to home and avoids any construction and permits that may be needed for large Generac/Kohler unit. Also no need to permanently dedicate backyard space.
    • Much less natural gas needed, less then 100CFH, as compared to big whole home unit
    • Less overall $, both upfront and ongoing
    This is all one person's opinion ... for this one home owner situation ... certainly understand that others may want a true whole home permanently mounted automatic standby unit. :)
     
  3. Dec 9, 2012 #243 of 369
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I really got a thing for meters. I do wish I hadn't seen that. Now I want one. I think I only saw 2 Teds that were for single phase.

    Yeah, you need that in writing. Suppose the guy that told you that died. I have over $10,000 in plastic fencing around my property and the guy that installed it all guarantees his work for life. Unfortunately, and very sadly, I really like this guy, he has cancer, so the lifetime warranty dies with him and his company when he passes. Seemed pretty healthy the last time I saw him.

    We used to use them in our plant and most contractors that we employed used them. Very dependable.

    Rich
     
  4. Dec 9, 2012 #244 of 369
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Bit of a PITA, but with PVC rather than conduit, it's much easier. Thing about that interlock kit is you have to be there. My main concern during storms is my three sump pumps. I have two fireplaces and access to a gully full of blown down trees, so heating the house isn't a problem. A/C is another story, both my wife and son have terrible allergies and we need the A/C for health reasons.

    I kinda doubt the code inspector would let you do that. I know our power company wouldn't.

    Rich
     
  5. Dec 9, 2012 #245 of 369
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I think I'd go with the 5000-C. For $40 more it looks neater.

    If you do go with a portable genny, what kind of disconnect do you get for the NG?

    Rich
     
  6. Sixto

    Sixto Well-Known Member

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    Nov 18, 2005
    The more I investigate the TED, it does have it's issues. It uses X10 to communicate and I see lots of comments of people with issues, may need inline filter to eliminate interference, not sold on it yet.

    Now leaning towards getting the inverter working first with gasoline, test everything out with inlet/wiring/interlock, and then after success then convert to tri-fuel and do that myself which will allow me to understand the conversion, test everything before any modification, and have the option to switch back if I need to since I'll have both methods tested.

    Now have everything figured out mostly, expect this will take a couple of months, hopefully no storms in the meantime!
     
  7. jkbird59

    jkbird59 Cool Member

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    Dec 22, 2006
  8. Sixto

    Sixto Well-Known Member

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    Nov 18, 2005
    Personally ruled them out due to noise (72 dba) and non-inverter, but others may be interested.
     
  9. Vin

    Vin Legend

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    Mar 29, 2004
    Yes, this is the $64,000 question.


    I can't argue with this logic or Rich's but based on my personal experience I'm just 'not there yet' so I will take Tom's approach for now....only time will tell if I need to take it to the next level. :grin:


     
  10. alnielsen

    alnielsen Godfather

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    Dec 31, 2006
    ...- .....
    Any one in the northern 2/3rds of the country, as long as they have overhead power lines, has a chance on seeing a moderate power disruption. Mainly due to ice storms. Then theirs always the more local disruptions due to a transformer blowing out or a tree limb knocking out a line. These are usually fixed within 24 hrs, but it will be nice to have the luxury to mostly go on without feeling the affects.
     
  11. BlackDynamite

    BlackDynamite Legend

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    Jun 5, 2007
    This sounds pretty much perfect to me. Thanks for doing all the leg work!

    How much does this cost? Do you have links to where it can be purchased?
     
  12. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    I haven't looked over your list in detail, but I have to say, I think you might want to think about the interlock kit a second time. With it, you won't have a way to reliably know your power came back on without shutting stuff off. Its forcing you to choose all or nothing. I think the unit that someone else linked to earlier may be a better solution. One of those that can drive most circuits but not all would allow you to pick and choose some and leave others untouched. Plus its also completely fool proof as well so you never have to worry about a line being fed by both sources at the same time, just as the interlock does.

    Here is the link he posted, and it looks like they have several different products that are in the same category.

    http://www.reliancecontrols.com/ProductDetail.aspx?51410C

    Just thought you might want to look at it...

    I'll have to research this whole tri fuel thing. Guess I'm not sure who that works with a regular generator, and I wonder what kind of affect it has on a units noise levels.
     
  13. Vin

    Vin Legend

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    Having lived in NJ my whole life I can attest to everything you've stated but having a chance is not the same as what typically occurs at any given location, which is what my course of action is being based on.
     
  14. Tom_S

    Tom_S Icon

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    Yeah, exactly. It is natural to freak-out when such a major disaster occurs, I know a few people that went all-out and spent thousands and that's fine. In probably 99% of the outages I think a smaller 7000 watt portable will more than suffice.

    I didn't account for gas being so scarce, I always figured If I had a few days worth that was more than enough, and it would have been fine except for the hundreds of people from NJ coming to my small town and draining our local station(s). But this was a storm that NEVER happened before. I consider that happening again very remote.
     
  15. Vin

    Vin Legend

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    Mar 29, 2004

    The http://www.interlockkit.com/ gives you the option to choose which circuits are on at any given time, unlike a transfer switch where those decisions need to be made upon installation. Also, a manual transfer switch like the one you linked to needs to be manually turned off before restoring utility power....same as an interlock kit.

    If someoned needed to know the moment the street power is back up, this device might be an option when using a manual transfer switch or interlock kit > http://www.homedepot.com/buy/reliance-controls-powerback-utility-power-return-alert-thp108.html.
     
  16. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    Correct me if I am wrong, but that interlock kit makes it so your main breaker for your entire main panel is either on, or off and the entire panel is then connected to the generator.

    That means if anything in your house is connected via the generator, everything in your house is connected to the generator. And saying its allowing you to choose which circuits are on the generator is a bit misleading. It allows you to choose which ones are on and off, simply by flipping circuit breakers, it does not allow you to choose which circuits are power by the generator, and which are left on the main service.

    The switch I linked to, that's not the case. Those switches allow you to bypass only certain circuits, while leavening the rest of the house untouched. This means if you are strategic, you can have half the house or so connected always to the main service, and half or so connected to the generator.

    That switch I linked to simply allows you to pick and choose upon installation what source an individual circuit gets its power from, where the interlock makes you choose for your entire system. Personally, I see more advantages of choosing certain key circuits in advance.

    Really the difference is personal preference to a great extent, but I think with a little pre planning, choosing circus in advance based on location and logical need may make more sense to me. Of course, some of that may also depend on how your house was wired, how many sub panels you have, and so on.
     
  17. Vin

    Vin Legend

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    The interlock kit gives you access to your entire panel at all times, however, you can still choose which circuits are on and which ones are off at any given time. Of course, you do have to be sure not to exceed the capability (wattage) of your generator but the worst that would happen is the generator would kick off, at which point you'd know you had too many circuits on.

    Not exactly. The main panel is always in control of all the circuits unless the transfer switch is manually engaged, then the pre chosen circuits are the only ones that can be on and powered by the generator. But like the interlock kit, when the power goes out it involves user interface and also will not allow the main panel to be fed by the utility power and the generator at the same time.
     
  18. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    Again, personal preference to me. The disadvantage to the interlock is that it does make you choose one source or the other for everything, period. Of course you don't have to have all the circuits on, but then in some houses that have multiple sub panels in differne threads, this is more of a hassle.


    I'll have to re read but the one I linked based on a quick view of how its wired, allows you to leave other circuits wired to the main service and turned on, because the transfer panel is wired in after the main panels circuit breakers, and there fore chooses a source for the circuit after the main panel circuit breaker for that circuit, and not a source for the actual panel.
     
  19. Joe C

    Joe C Godfather

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    Interlock kit is the way to go. Being able to use a light in any room is nice especially in the winter when it gets dark early. I have the Power Back unit listed above, it does work but the alarm is low. A portable baby monitor would help to hear the alarm especially if the main panel is far away from the main area of the house.
     
  20. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I bought my home in Piscataway in 1986 and for 10 years we had no problems. Then we had a "500" year storm. OK, we got thru that, I figured I might not live another 500 years, so we were safe. Next came a "1,000" year storm. Then, we got a "1,500" year storm and I stopped believing that stuff completely.

    Wonder what Sandy was? Was it just an anomaly or are we doomed to get these massive storms periodically now? I'm not really ready to take that chance. Not with the Raritan River just a few hundred feet from my home. I can run my sump pumps off my 5500 portable genny, that's not a problem. My mailman still doesn't have power and he's got a well and a septic system. Same town. That really bothers me.

    Rich
     

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