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Dish Ground

Discussion in 'General DISH™ Discussion' started by ebox4greg, Feb 4, 2013.

  1. Feb 4, 2013 #1 of 12
    ebox4greg

    ebox4greg AllStar

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    Dec 2, 2012
    Couldn't find my old thread, but here's the ground re-work after they came back out. they connected the ground to the electrical box of the HVAC unit.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Feb 4, 2013 #2 of 12
    gov

    gov Legend

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    Jan 11, 2013
    LOL.

    One of my very first questions should I be so lucky to go to heaven when I expire is to ask for the real poop on grounding.

    I've seen electronics with 3 prong cords, and 2 prong cords, I've seen a very highly skilled sat installer blow up a receiver just by plugging it into a wall outlet, I've been shocked on antennas and different electronics in a variety of homes. I've seen an improperly grounded satellite system survive a lightning strike that hit a tree 5 feet from the dish, I've seen properly grounded coax turned inside out by lightning (seen the reverse of both of those too).

    I don't know that I would consider any 'universal' grounding strategy as 'correct', and sorry to say, but I roll my eyes when any installer cites any procedure as gospel.

    As for my business, I follow whatever the service provider wants. When it's up to me, I follow the 'octopus' theory (everything grounded to a single point) and I advise customers I really like to see a whole home surge on their electric panel. (Menards has them for around $60). I'd rather see that than a $200 outlet strip. (LOL, but I do have a $200 outlet strip in my home on the big plasma system).

    Hopefully (it's all we have) you get by and lightning doesn't pay a visit, and the light company does their job.
     
  3. Feb 4, 2013 #3 of 12
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    Jul 25, 2002
    Mediterranea...
    seems to me, for that very low position of your dish, chances of lightening strike is minimal ... perhaps induced voltage, but not direct strike; especially if you have on top of your home/chimney some metal connected to earth ground rod
     
  4. Feb 4, 2013 #4 of 12
    west99999

    west99999 Icon

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    May 11, 2007
    The AC unit is an appliance, like a freezer, microwave etc
    • The AC unit service enclosure is not compliant.
    o The AC service frequently uses a ground wire that is smaller than what is required by
    the NEC for DIRECTV.
    o The AC service ground is not designed to handle the additional voltages introduced by
    the DIRECTV, Inc. system.
    o A future change in AC wiring may eliminate our ground.
    o Metal boxes and conduit installed to support the AC unit may not be made electrically
    continuous to the service panel.
    o Use of an AC grounding wire introduces potential differences that could put an IRD at
    risk from unwanted AC unit induced voltages.
     
  5. Feb 4, 2013 #5 of 12
    ebox4greg

    ebox4greg AllStar

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    Dec 2, 2012
    So, experts, was this done correctly or not?

    If the dish had been installed on the side of the house where the electric meter was, it would have been attached to the ground block which does into the ground.

    LOS stopped that from happening
     
  6. Feb 4, 2013 #6 of 12
    ebox4greg

    ebox4greg AllStar

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    Dec 2, 2012
    This is a DISH NETWORK system, not DIRECTV, not that it matters.
     
  7. Feb 4, 2013 #7 of 12
    west99999

    west99999 Icon

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    It doesnt matter point is the ac enclosure is not a valid NEC ground no matter who your provider is. If the power is on the other side then the coax from dish should have been ran to that side and grounded and then to each room in your house.
     
  8. Feb 4, 2013 #8 of 12
    ebox4greg

    ebox4greg AllStar

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    Dec 2, 2012
    Guess that will be Dish network's issue if something happens...
     
  9. Feb 5, 2013 #9 of 12
    Grandude

    Grandude RichardParker II

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    Oct 21, 2004
    I'm happy with it. Gosh, it isn't POWER ground. It's STATIC ground designed to run any static electricity from nearby lightning to ground rather than into the house and into the tuner or whatever electronic device the shielded cable is going to from the ground block.

    If you live in lightning storm areas, pulling the plugs and cables from the equipment during storms is the most reliable way to protect your equipment.

    Ground LOOPS are another thing related to improper power grounding and not closely related to this grounding topic.

    Brian, GOS, TOTC.:grin:
     
  10. ebox4greg

    ebox4greg AllStar

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    Dec 2, 2012
    I thought it looked ok, but was just asking opinions.
     
  11. west99999

    west99999 Icon

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    May 11, 2007
     
  12. DoyleS

    DoyleS Icon

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    Oct 21, 2002
    El Dorado...
    Based on the link below it looks like your installation is fine in terms of grounding. The only thing your pictures don't show is whether there is actually a ground wire inside the conduit that is tied to the box. It would seem that is the case for an HVAC unit but opening that panel to confirm will answer that. The key risk with your installation is not so much lightning but static buildup from wind and that is easily conducted to ground with your ground wire to the box.
    Here is the link.
    http://ecmweb.com/qampa/code-quandaries-7
     

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