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Dish Needs to Get Moving on 3D

Discussion in 'DISH™ High Definition Discussion' started by Michael1, May 18, 2011.

What is your current interest in 3D?

  1. I own a 3DTV and am anxious for more 3D content

    28 vote(s)
    25.0%
  2. I don't yet own a 3DTV but am planning to buy within the next 6 months

    11 vote(s)
    9.8%
  3. I own a 3DTV but am not really interested in 3D content

    19 vote(s)
    17.0%
  4. I don't own a 3DTV and am not planning on investing in 3D in the near future

    54 vote(s)
    48.2%
  1. Feb 8, 2012 #341 of 616
    Michael1

    Michael1 Legend

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    I did see your link. That would explain why 3D demand is still low. We've only got another 19 years to go before we have even 50% demand.:)

    Direct having fewer HD channels than most cable companies, is one reason why I am with Dish. Movies especially look awful in standard definition these days.

    Michael
     
  2. Feb 8, 2012 #342 of 616
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Most cable companies? Do you have more than one to choose between where you live?

    Surprising that cable, wherever, has better movie selection than the sat providers.
     
  3. Feb 8, 2012 #343 of 616
    Orion9

    Orion9 Legend

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    My parents also watch nothing but noisy analog cable stretched to 16:9 on their HDTV. It gives me headaches but they feel it's fine. Some of my early Tivo-adopting friends have bought HDTVs but still have only SD service because of the old TiVos.

    I wonder how far off the 4K channels are? ;)
     
  4. Feb 9, 2012 #344 of 616
    inazsully

    inazsully Icon

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    I guess that Dish should certainly have a feel for the demand of 3D, but, in looking at the 2012 TV offerings I see that Panasonic will roll out 16 3D plasma models. Not sure about Sony, Samsung, LG, Vizio, Sharp etc but it seems to me that Dish should be involved in the 3D game. When you buy a new TV in 2012 the odds are it will be 3D capable (42"+). As an existing Dish customer I expect my provider to offer at least some 3D viewing options? I don't expect it for free and I'm sure "D" is not offering it for free. I would like to think that my provider is the leader in the industry, not the "lets wait and see how it shakes out" provider.
     
  5. Feb 9, 2012 #345 of 616
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Yeah... but those 3D TVs are also HDTVs... and still 40-50% or customers seem to be connecting SD services to their HDTVs today... Dish still has more SD receivers in the field than HD receivers by a long shot I believe... so just because everyone kind of gets forced to buy a 3D TV these days doesn't mean they have any interest in it.
     
  6. Feb 9, 2012 #346 of 616
    inazsully

    inazsully Icon

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    Very true for sure. But don't you think that curiosity alone will cause most to at least want to check 3D out after they've purchased the set? I'm more concerned about the folks that are looking for a provider and thinking that if the price is the same or close why not go with the company providing 3D. If Dish eventually begins offering 3D, and I think they will, why come in on the back end? It's no big deal to me because it will be a couple of years before I'm ready for a new TV but in my large retirement community I am often asked what TV to buy and what service to use. Most have cable which I never recommend so it's usually Dish. Not sure what to tell them if they buy a 3D TV, especially since I'm seeing a lot of these TV's including a free 3D player and a movie or two.
     
  7. Feb 9, 2012 #347 of 616
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    IF I had a compatible 3DTV, I would be curious... but I wouldn't be looking to pay a lot, especially if I had to subscribe to a 3D add-on or pay for premium content... so curiosity doesn't necessarily translate into reliable revenue for Dish yet.

    I grant you that it behooves a company like Dish to test the waters (like they did with HD) and try to be a little bit ahead of the curve... but I think they are probably hedging for the same reason the other providers, 3D Blu-ray, and everyone else is... because there hasn't been a huge jump by consumers indicating that they are willing to pay more for 3D on a regular basis.

    IF that shift starts... then I have no doubt we will see more 3D on Dish... but until then, I would hate to see customer bills going up to pay for 3D investments that Dish isn't able to sell well enough to pay for themselves by subscribers.
     
  8. Feb 9, 2012 #348 of 616
    tampa8

    tampa8 Godfather/Supporter

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    Sure,many places have more than one Cable choice. In Florida at my house it would be Brighthouse or FIOS, even in rural Ct. Charter or Uverse.
     
  9. RasputinAXP

    RasputinAXP Kwisatz Haderach of Cordcuttery

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    I keep trying out those 3D TVs when I'm at Best Buy. It looks like a moving Viewmaster and isn't very "real" to me. I tried a few different sources, too: ESPN 3D, Avatar 3D Bluray...*shrug* I get it. I just don't...'get' it.
     
  10. Michael1

    Michael1 Legend

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    Feb 24, 2010
    Actually, Direct includes 3D free with HD.

    The poster has a good point. Whether Dish likes it or not, they are in the technology industry. You can't wait to see what happens. Microsoft hesitated with the phone and tablet markets. Big mistake. Look where they are now. Waaaaayyyyy behind, and playing catchup, if they can ever catch up.

    Michael
     
  11. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    The wide availability of hardware is no assurance that a technology is going to ultimately appeal to the masses. Consider HD DVD.

    Perhaps the 3D of today is yesterday's VCR+ -- a stepping stone to the real thing.
     
  12. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    It isn't that Microsoft wasn't trying to compete. They were just marketing their mean old porcupine as a hedgehog.
     
  13. inazsully

    inazsully Icon

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    HD DVD (Toshiba) had direct competition from a bigger player Blu-Ray (Sony). Today's 3D technology not only has no competing technology but has the backing of every TV manufacture in the world as well as every movie studio in the world not to mention ESPN, ABC, Disney etc. Journey 2 opens today using the same 3D cameras Cameron used in Avatar. Wait and see how it does in theaters. That could be a good barometer for the future acceptance of well done 3D. The key word is WELL DONE 3D. If it knocks your socks off people will want it, especially if it's a free HD option as it is with "D". One thing I know about the American consumer, they like free.
     
  14. david_jr

    david_jr Godfather

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    To further the point that many feed an HDTV an SD source, a local hospital near me just outfitted their entire hospital with all 32 in HDTVs in every room, but are feeding them with the worst SD cable signal imaginable. I seemed to be the only one in the hospital who really cared. Unfortunatley was there every day for a couple of weeks with a sick relative. I pointed it out to a few others who visited and to some of the staff that I met, but noone seemed bothered by it at all. All of this makes me tend to believe that demand for 3D just isn't that high among the masses when a lot aren't even bothered by SD on HDTV.
     
  15. inazsully

    inazsully Icon

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    I think that most would be bothered by a SD signal into their home display, especially if it was 42"+. But who knows, there are an awful lot of TV watchers out there. I assume that "E" has a pretty good idea based on what equipment they have in the field.
     
  16. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    But today's 3D does indeed have competition in the form of something that we hope must be coming: glasses-free 3D.

    My point with HD DVD was that even owning a majority on the brands and models doesn't insure success with an even chance. 3D that requires glasses doesn't even have an even chance against what we hope can be glasses-free in the long haul.
     
  17. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    What is the difference in the signal or in transmission between 3D sent to a 3D TV set that requires glasses vs a 3D TV that is glasses-free?

    DISH delayed their launch of 3D in 2010 because better transmission technology and processor chips were coming. DISH did not want to launch a 3D service around 2009/2010 technology and be stuck supporting that level. (Much like the introduction of NTSC color television was stuck supporting NTSC black-and-white television until both technologies were replaced by ATSC.)

    But the difference between glasses and glasses-free? That is all in the set. That is part of the competition between set makers, not 3D broadcast technology. If you're looking for an excuse why DISH hasn't done 3D, don't blame glasses-free.
     
  18. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    We don't know if a different technology (perhaps checkerboard) will lend itself better to the rigors of glasses-free.

    My point is that most people don't want to watch 3D with special glasses on and that's why so many are holding out for something better.
     
  19. inazsully

    inazsully Icon

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    Not wanting to wear glasses is the biggest reason by far for people not interested in watching 3D followed by people getting headaches because their brain doesn't handle the visual signal. Glasses free 3D TV's are now on the market in Japan but I have no idea what kind of technology is being used accomplish this. It's hard for me to wrap my mind around the delivery technology of glasses free 3D. I hope they are a raging success. It will take stunning 3D at no extra cost to convince people that wearing inexpensive stylish glasses is acceptable. By the way, HD DVD blew away Blu-Ray for PQ. I still have my Toshiba sitting under my Panasonic Blu-Ray. My wife made me buy "Twilight: Breaking Dawn Part 1" today.
     
  20. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    The glasses-free 3D sets I saw at CES were so-so at best.

    And by what measure was HD DVD better than Blu-ray?
     

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