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DVR Playback: Viewers Watch More Ads Than Expected

Discussion in 'TV Show Talk' started by phrelin, Dec 17, 2007.

  1. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Northern...
    I surely can't relate to this story:
     
  2. Drew2k

    Drew2k New Member

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    I know since I got my HR20 with SLIP functionality that I've "seen" more commercials, but I still don't really watch them. I'm just more generally aware of which advertisers are on during the shows I watch ...
     
  3. Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

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    I think that the article makes it obvious that there are a lot of ways to use a DVR and we at DBSTalk don't have an exclusive on how they're used.
     
  4. dhhaines

    dhhaines Hall Of Fame

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    I guess I'm in the less than half and the one quarter minority. :)
     
  5. Terry740

    Terry740 AllStar

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    I find these conclusions to be suspect. I and my friends mainly have DVRs for that very reason ,to stop watching commercials.I fast forwarded even in the old vcr days. I think this "survey " was dreamed up to help with ad revenues.
     
  6. sean10780

    sean10780 Godfather

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    Is there another reason why we should have dvr's, besides skipping commercials and recording things when we can't watch them.
     
  7. Supramom2000

    Supramom2000 In Loving Memory of Onyx-2/23/09

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    My husband refuses to even watch any of his favorites on live tv any longer. He records everything and watches it later. He only watches live tv during the afternoon when he is watching Science channel or National Geographic.

    He cannot stand commercials. He even records the Seahawks and watches it later to fast forward through the commercials. :nono2:
     
  8. dhhaines

    dhhaines Hall Of Fame

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    So an NFL game FF through commercials takes him what? 30 minutes tops? :lol:
     
  9. sean10780

    sean10780 Godfather

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    A 30 min NFL game, boy would my wife LOVE that.
     
  10. dhhaines

    dhhaines Hall Of Fame

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    Do the math... cut out the commercials, the huddles.. the replays.. how much actual action is there??
     
  11. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Northern...
    Haven't watched NFL in the past five years, but as I remember there were 4 quarters of...oh say...15 minutes of real play or something like that. Or maybe that was NBA? I'm old and my memory isn't what it used to be.:confused:
     
  12. tomcrown1

    tomcrown1 Hall Of Fame

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    :icon_kiff I record on my DVR to ff through the shows and just watch the ADS I love the ADS by the way I own the Golden Gate Bridge and I have it up for sale on E-Bay
     
  13. dhhaines

    dhhaines Hall Of Fame

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    I like the Golden Gate Bridge.... what is the buy now price??? :lol:
     
  14. tomcrown1

    tomcrown1 Hall Of Fame

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    One Million Dollars(shagg me baby):eek2:
     
  15. Supramom2000

    Supramom2000 In Loving Memory of Onyx-2/23/09

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    Colbert, WA
    When you FF through the non-plays and commercials, I think it is about 36.5 minutes!!
     
  16. dhhaines

    dhhaines Hall Of Fame

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    I was close then... Years ago with VHS a friend of mine said he would watch a game in 45 minutes. Not sure if I believed him or not. :grin:
     
  17. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Northern...
    Hmm. Maybe I'll start watch NFL again if I can do it in 45 minutes. That's about one plate of wings and a beer. About right!
     
  18. frederic1943

    frederic1943 Icon

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    Enjoy skipping over commercials while you can.:D

    Officially called "Digital Broadcast Television Redistribution Control," the FCC's rule is in 47 CFR 73.9002(b) and the following sections, stating in part: "No party shall sell or distribute in interstate commerce a Covered Demodulator Product that does not comply with the Demodulator Compliance Requirements and Demodulator Robustness Requirements." According to the rule, hardware must "actively thwart" piracy.

    The rule's Demodulator Compliance Requirements insists that all HDTV demodulators must "listen" for a broadcast flag (or assume it to be present in all signals). Flagged content must be output only to "protected outputs" (such as DVI and HDMI ports with HDCP encryption), or in degraded form through analog outputs or digital outputs with visual resolution of 720x480 pixels (EDTV) or less. Flagged content may be recorded only by "authorized" methods, which include tethering of recordings to a single device.

    A broadcast flag is a set of status bits (or a "flag") sent in the data stream of a digital television program that indicates whether or not the data stream can be recorded, or if there are any restrictions on recorded content. Possible restrictions include the inability to save an unencrypted digital program to a hard disk or other non-volatile storage, inability to make secondary copies of recorded content (in order to share or archive), forceful reduction of quality when recording (such as reducing high-definition video to the resolution of standard TVs), and inability to skip over commercials.

    In the United States, new television receivers using the ATSC standard were supposed to incorporate this functionality by July 1, 2005, but a federal court struck down the Federal Communications Commission's rule to this effect on May 6, 2005. The stated intention of the broadcast flag was to prevent copyright infringement, but many have asserted that broadcast flags interfere with the fair use rights of the viewing public.
    It is possible that a higher court may overturn this ruling, or the United States Congress may grant such authority to the FCC. Some of the major U.S. television networks have stated in the past that they will stop broadcasting high-definition content if the rule does not go into effect.
     
  19. paulman182

    paulman182 Hall Of Fame

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    You'd better hope it works, then, or you'll be paying as much as we who watch only the premium channels!:)
     
  20. Sirshagg

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    For me one big plus is the ability to start watching a show from the beginning that is still recording. I still skip commerials too.
     

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