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Electric Car Batteries Breakthru

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Dave, Jan 30, 2011.

  1. Dave

    Dave Icon

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    Today I was looking around on the web and rememebered some articles about the next great breakthru in electric car batteries. If it ever comes to pass there are (2) TWO companies who claim to have solved the electric car problem for distance and a fast recharge time. They say it is a Carbon-Flouride battery. Suppose to take you 300 miles between charges and a quick (5) minutes to recharge. The companies are Contour Energy Sytems in California and EEStor out of Texas. This does sound like something that would hold my interest in a electric car. If it ever comes to pass. Maybe progrss can be made for the driving public with these batteries.
     
  2. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    :confused: How many watts are there during that "five min recharge"? :eek2:
     
  3. Dave

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    Niether company gets into specifics about that or how may watts is needed for this quick charge. I do know they, both companies have been working on the problems for at least (3) or more years. I guess we just have to wait and see, if they can produce the end product.
     
  4. Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    Enough to spin the electric meter wheel off its bearings.
     
  5. matt

    matt New Member

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    Who cares? Just use this "stealth electric car charging kit" and slip in on the line side. ;) (I know it's only one pole, I have to find my other clamps to make a complete set.)

    :lol:
     

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  6. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    I find it amazing how many press clips about "you need to be worried about not getting where you want to go and have to recharge" we're getting. . .

    and in full disclosure- we have a Nissan Leaf on order but it'll probably be Fall before we see it. We have a Highlander Hybrid and very pleased with it.
     
  7. 4HiMarks

    4HiMarks Hall Of Fame

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    That's the way the American public drives. Most electric cars I've heard of will only go between 40-100 miles on a charge. My first question is "In what kind of traffic/at what speed?" I don't know what the exact efficiency function is, but I can't believe that you use the same amount of energy driving 40 miles at 5 mph as you do at 55 mph. Yes you use less energy per minute, but you are driving for a lot more minutes.

    My work is about 17 miles from my house, almost all of it on I-95. When there is no traffic (e.g. late at night or mid-day), I can make the trip at highway speed, in about 20-25 minutes. During rush hour, it takes more like 35-45 minutes, and a lot of that is below 20 mph. And I have a relatively short commute compared to most other people in the DC area. If I had a car with a 40 mile range, and it dropped off much at all in heavy traffic, I would not be able to make it to work and back on a single charge. If I had to run an errand after work that took me more than 3 miles out of the way, again I would not be able to make it home. If I wanted to visit my sister, I couldn't even make it one way to the other side of the DC Metro area where she lives. And even if I could stretch it that far, how long would I have to stay there recharging before venturing home, and how much of her electricity would I use?

    An electric car might be fine if you are a retiree, or live in a small town where your commute is 5 minutes, but around here they need to have a much longer range, or a much shorter recharge time, or both.
     
  8. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    GM made an all electric car back in the '90s. They leased it in the LA area.
    These aren't to be your "one and only" car, but most found they would do 90% of what they needed.
    I doubt the "mileage" drops off going slow.
    Where a gas engine would be "idling" these simply turn themselves off.
    Add to this the faster you go the more resistance you need to overcome, driving slow should get better range/mileage.
     
  9. BattleZone

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    Electric cars are actually more efficient than gas in stop-and-go traffic and at low speeds. Traveling at constant high speed is where a gas engine excells.
     
  10. davring

    davring Hall Of Fame

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    Tha battery cost will need to come down drastically for the consumer to ever realize any savings operating an electric car. What value will a 5-7 year old Leaf have when the replacement battery pack costs more than the car is worth?
     
  11. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Constance speed helps, but "high" isn't good for either, as the force required goes up by the square.
     
  12. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    Sure, but we're talking about driving 60 MPH vs stop-and-go.
     
  13. RobertE

    RobertE New Member

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    1.21 jiggawatts or gigawatts depending on who you ask. :D
     
  14. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I would think that 5 minute charge wouldn't be a full recharge. To dump that much juice to fully recharge the battery, you'd need a huge cable to carry that much amperage. I can get a "quick" recharge of my razor in about 5 minutes, but it just lasts long enough to finish a shave.

    Rich
     
  15. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I think that's the reason most Prius cars (I didn't know the plural of Prius) are leased now. I have a friend who bought one when they first came out and I don't think he had the option to lease it then. He does like it, tho. And he's getting close to the eight year limit, but he owns an auto repair shop and I suppose he can get the batteries cheaper and install them himself.

    Rich
     
  16. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    The Prius has been in the US since 2000. I haven't seen any reports of bad experiences in having to change batteries and I'm sure many are exceeding 100K miles.

    I'm approaching 70K on my 2006 Highlander. I asked the service manager last trip if I should start planning anything for the batteries. He quickly said no.

    And I think with the improvements in batteries (and charging circuits) over the last 10 years, we're going to see some longer life and higher capacities.
     
  17. houskamp

    houskamp New Member

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    would take the power of a few city blocks to charge a battery like that in 5 min :eek:
     
  18. Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    NY Hudson...
    Yeah, that five minute recharge got me too!
     
  19. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    Perhaps someone lost one zero ? Should be 50 minutes [to 80% ?].
     
  20. Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    NY Hudson...
    The time to eat a decent lunch would double the distant you could drive on a trip.
     

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