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Every Channel in HD

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Programming' started by phatmatt1215, Feb 17, 2008.

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  1. Tom Robertson

    Tom Robertson Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    I don't see a full replacement in 5 years (and I kinda think of that as a long-ish time) but I do agree that 10 years is quite reasonable.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  2. cartrivision

    cartrivision Hall Of Fame

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    I’m not saying that MPEG4 receivers will be ubiquitous within 5 years, only that within 5 years from the time that DirecTV starts deploying only MPEG4 receivers, the overwhelming majority of their installed receivers will be MPEG4 capable. That said, I think that DirecTV's MPEG2 SD mirrors of existing HD channels will be history at a time considerably shorter than 10 years from today. Forget depending on churn to get MPEG2 receivers out of circulation, within 5 years, very significant numbers of DirecTV customers are going to have done voluntary upgrades to MPEG4 HD capable receivers.
     
  3. Tom Robertson

    Tom Robertson Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    Yes, we know that MPEG2 HD will be going completely away within a year or two. That has been made pretty clear, tho the exact timelines depend on MPEG2 HD receiver replacement rates. :)

    For MPEG2 SD to transition, you know the first sign will be a D13/D14 or D15 and R17or R18 SD receivers that are MPEG4 compatible. That will start the clock, I think. (Or the complete stop of the D and R series.) Five to 10 years after that point, MPEG2 will disappear. :)

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  4. cartrivision

    cartrivision Hall Of Fame

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    Yes, there is little doubt that the MPEG2 HD channels will be gone from DirecTV within a year or so. In the above posts however, I was talking more about the eventual demise if the MPEG2 SD mirrors of the MPEG4 HD channels. Once everyone has an MPEG4 capable receiver (even if some of them are SD only receivers), there is no need to broadcast all the SD channels that have a corresponding HD channel.

    Do we know for sure that the R16s can't decode MPGE4 SD?
     
  5. Tom Robertson

    Tom Robertson Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    From the R16 First Look thread.
    So my guess is that MPEG4 decoder chips are still too expensive to put in every receiver at this point. So the clock hasn't started yet. :)

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  6. GrumpyBear

    GrumpyBear Hall Of Fame

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    From Wiki

    NBC provided the catalyst for rapid color expansion by announcing that its prime time schedule for fall 1965 would be almost entirely in color.[38] All three broadcast networks were airing full color prime time schedules by the 1966–67 broadcast season, and ABC aired its last new black and white daytime programming in December 1967.[39] But the number of color television sets sold in the U.S. did not exceed black and white sales until 1972, which was also the first year that more than fifty percent of television households in the U.S. had a color set.[40] This was also the year that "in color" notices before color television programs ended, due to the rise in color television set sales.

    Interesting that it took 7 years before Color TV's, were over 50% of sales, even though all the primetime TV shows had converted over to Color, for most of that time.
     
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