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Fall Solar Outage

Discussion in 'General Satellite Discussion' started by timothylego, Sep 23, 2007.

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  1. timothylego

    timothylego Cool Member

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    May 8, 2007
    Does anyone have any information on when the fall solar outages will occur? I had channels on the 110 go off for a few minutes today around 5:30 PM. I live in Pittsburgh, PA and I would hate to have them happen when I'm watching my Steelers or Penn State games.
     
  2. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

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    Mar 25, 2002
    http://theclassicalstation.org/solar_outage.shtml
    More.... I am sure there is a better site to explain this as they got the equinox dates wrong, but the outage days right. The equinox is today, outages occur a bit after the equinox in the fall and before the equinox in the spring. If we were watching from the equator today would be the day. Since we don't live in Brazil we have to wait a few days. :D
     
  3. EVAC41

    EVAC41 Legend

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    Jun 27, 2006
    Here is another site that explains the solar outages

    Click here...
     
  4. aim2pls

    aim2pls Icon

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    Jun 18, 2007
    roughly mid oct starting in the south first and moving north as the month progresses
     
  5. Oct 2, 2007 #5 of 18
    Chris Blount

    Chris Blount Creator of DBSTalk Staff Member Administrator DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Jun 22, 2001
    Here is more information:


    Location Outage Time (EDT)

    Alaska (Anchorage) October 12–14, 2:09 p.m.

    Alaska (Barrow) October 13–15, 2:13 p.m.

    Alaska (Fairbanks) October 12–15, 2:11 p.m.

    Alaska (Southern) October 10–14, 2:10 p.m.

    Alabama October 4–8, 2:31 p.m.

    Arkansas October 5–9, 2:28 p.m.

    Arizona October 5–8, 2:16 p.m.

    California (Northern) October 7–10, 2:12 p.m.

    California (San Francisco) October 6–10, 2:12 p.m.

    California (Los Angeles) October 5–8, 2:13 p.m.

    Colorado October 7–10, 2:21 p.m.

    Connecticut October 7–11, 2:36 p.m.

    District of Columbia October 6–10, 2:35 p.m.

    Florida (Miami) October 2–5, 2:36 p.m.

    Florida (Tallahassee) October 4–7, 2:33 p.m.

    Georgia October 5–8, 2:33 p.m.

    Hawaii Sep 30–Oct 2, 1:56 p.m.

    Iowa October 7–11, 2:26 p.m.

    Idaho October 8–11, 2:15 p.m.

    Illinois (Chicago) October 7–11, 2:29 p.m.

    Illinois (Springfield) October 7–10, 2:29 p.m.

    Indiana October 7–10, 2:30 p.m.

    Kansas October 6–10, 2:24 p.m.

    Kentucky October 6–10, 2:32 p.m.

    Louisiana October 4–7, 2:29 p.m.

    Massachusetts October 7–11, 2:36 p.m.

    Maryland October 6–10, 2:35 p.m.

    Maine October 8–12, 2:37 p.m.

    Michigan October 8–11, 2:31 p.m.

    Minnesota (St. Paul) October 8–11, 2:26 p.m.

    Missouri October 7–10, 2:26 p.m.

    Mississippi October 5–8, 2:30 p.m.

    Montana October 9–12, 2:19 p.m.

    North Carolina October 5–9, 2:34 p.m.

    North Dakota October 9–13, 2:22 p.m.

    Nebraska October 7–11, 2:24 p.m.

    New Hampshire October 8–11, 2:36 p.m.

    New Jersey October 7–10, 2:36 p.m.

    New Mexico October 5–9, 2:20 p.m.

    Nevada October 7–10, 2:14 p.m.

    New York October 7–10, 2:36 p.m.

    Ohio October 6–10, 2:31 p.m.

    Oklahoma October 5–9, 2:25 p.m.

    Oregon October 8–11, 2:13 p.m.

    Pennsylvania October 7–11, 2:34 p.m.

    Puerto Rico September 28–October 1, 2:46 p.m.

    South Carolina October 5–8, 2:34 p.m.

    South Dakota October 8–12, 2:22 p.m.

    Tennessee October 6–9, 2:31 p.m.

    Texas (Austin) October 3–7, 2:25 p.m.

    Texas (San Antonio) October 3–7, 2:24 p.m.

    Texas (Amarillo) October 5–9, 2:23 p.m.

    Utah October 6–10, 2:17 p.m.

    Virginia October 6–9, 2:35 p.m.

    Vermont October 8–11, 2:36 p.m.

    Washington October 9–12, 2:13 p.m.

    Wisconsin October 8–11, 2:28 p.m.

    West Virginia October 6–10, 2:20 p.m.

    Wyoming October 8–11, 2:19 p.m

    Source: http://www.prss.org/tech_support/fall_so.cfm
     
  6. Oct 2, 2007 #6 of 18
    turbrodude

    turbrodude AllStar

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    Sep 18, 2006
    Don't the outages happen at different times depending on which satellite you are looking at? 101W should have an outage before 103W as the sun moves across teh sky, right? So what are the above times for?
     
  7. Oct 2, 2007 #7 of 18
    Chris Blount

    Chris Blount Creator of DBSTalk Staff Member Administrator DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Jun 22, 2001
    True. My above post does only reflect one satellite but it was something quick just to give some general times.

    Here is a page with a calculator which might help. You can manually enter whatever satellite you want and your area for more accurate info for each satellite.

    http://www.intelsat.com/resources/satellitedata-pas/calc-sun-outages.asp
     
  8. Oct 2, 2007 #8 of 18
    ATARI

    ATARI Hall Of Fame

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    May 10, 2007
    Nice link, thanks!
     
  9. Oct 2, 2007 #9 of 18
    tkrandall

    tkrandall Hall Of Fame

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    Oct 3, 2003
    Try this site for details for your location. Also very useful for checking line of site if you have trees or other obstructions.
    http://gjullien.fr/satellite.htm
     
  10. BobaBird

    BobaBird EKB Editor

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    Mar 30, 2002
  11. Rosco

    Rosco AllStar

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    May 27, 2007
    I thought that some of the outages were on the directv uplink end also because sometimes you would receive a message on your screen instead of programming
     
  12. mocciat

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    Oct 17, 2006
    How long is the outage?
     
  13. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

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    Mar 25, 2002
    Actually, outages can occur from the uplink. The uplink is, afterall, a very large downlink also.
     
  14. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

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    Mar 25, 2002
    It's just a few minutes over a period of 3-4 days at your location. Of course, when the outage gets to the uplink center's lattitude you will potentially notice outages on throughout the day on different channels as the sun tracks behind the satellites supplying the signals to the uplink center.
     
  15. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

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    Mar 25, 2002
    In the old c-band days a person could track the sun across the sky and have a solar outage last throughout the day (I don't know why you would want to do this though). :D On the big dishes this is also the time of the most danger to your receive components at the dish since the energy from the sun is being bounced off the dish surface directly, at full force, into the LNB and it's housing. If you had a dish that was highly reflective it could damage your LNB. I once did a service call at Prince's house because of this. His very smooth surfaced (purple) solid fiberglas dish melted the LNB cover and damaged the LNB to the point that it had to be replaced.
     
  16. arxaw

    arxaw Icon

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    Jul 13, 2003
    Is this also when someone can check for LOS by looking for a sunny spot on the ground or roof?
     
  17. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

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    Mar 25, 2002
    Yep. As long as you know the proper time for the satellite you will be aiming for.
     
  18. arxaw

    arxaw Icon

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    Jul 13, 2003
    Richard,
    Thanks.
     
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