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Flat cable alternative

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by chuckyHDDTV, Nov 6, 2011.

  1. Nov 6, 2011 #1 of 26
    chuckyHDDTV

    chuckyHDDTV AllStar

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    Good afternoon gents.

    Are there any alternatives to using flat cable? I have ran through 3 of them and getting annoyed every time they fail. I live in an apartment, can't drill, and can't get RG6 under the window sill or under the door (too thick). Refresh my memory but I through I saw a product simular to a car celluar antenna window mount that passed the signal through the glass without drilling for coax cable. Wish I could put my dish inside but I have no LOS. Any suggestion will be greatly appreciated.

    Chuck
     
  2. Nov 6, 2011 #2 of 26
    Kevin F

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    I have heard of a product that can wirelessly transmit over RF but I think I also remember hearing it won't transmit the whole spectrum required by SWM/DECA as it is too high. However I could be wrong though.

    Kevin
     
  3. Nov 6, 2011 #3 of 26
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I moved into an apartment a couple of weeks back. I too can't drill and have my dish on the balcony. I used a piece of wood 1"x2"x8' and drilled my hole through it, with the siding door closing on it. For locking the door, I need to now use "a broom handle", but both are win-win for me.
     
  4. Nov 6, 2011 #4 of 26
    Kevin F

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    This could work in a window too right? A board under where the window would new the bottom and drill a hole through the piece of wood.

    Kevin
     
  5. Nov 6, 2011 #5 of 26
    jdspencer

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    Maybe replace the glass window pane with a piece of plexiglass and drill a hole in that.

    When you move out, put the glass pane back.
     
  6. Nov 6, 2011 #6 of 26
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Don't know why not.
     
  7. Nov 6, 2011 #7 of 26
    AntAltMike

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    You can try using a short piece of really flimsy 300 ohm flat cable, like the kind that comes with an FM dipole antenna, and pigtail your coax onto that. It never failed me with Legacy (950-1,450 MHz) equipment.

    Channel Plus used to make a product called Glass Link that would transmit through glass, but it would be very difficult to incorporate into a Ku/Ka system, if it could be done at all.
     
  8. Nov 6, 2011 #8 of 26
    TBlazer07

    TBlazer07 Grumpy Grampy

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    How about a jumper made with mini-coax like RG-174? That should slip under a door.
     
  9. Nov 7, 2011 #9 of 26
    carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    Keep in mind the coax sends DC power to the LNB assembly, and there is no through-glass device that can do that. The suggestion to use a strip of wood either along a window or sliding door opening and drill through that for your coax is the best suggestion. Then all you have to do is rig up a method of securing/locking the window in that position (a bar or strip of wood that sits in the edge that braces the window against the wood strip).
     
  10. Lord Vader

    Lord Vader Supreme Member

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    What kind of flat cable did you have? When I moved to my renovated unit and didn't want to continue an on again/off again/on again battle with my landlord, DirecTV installed these 4 cables that run alongside the bottom side frame of my balcony's sliding glass door. So far, they're working fine.
     
  11. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

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    GlassLink does. It claims to furnish 10.5 to 21.0 VDC at 130 to 200 mA.

    http://www.linearcorp.com/pdf/manuals/1111.pdf

    While its specs say the RF bandpass is 950 - 1,450 MHz, there isn't necessarly a lowpass filter in it.
     
  12. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    This sure looks like it's for a single SD receiver.
    Not quite sure how they get DC between the two units, but would guess it's inductive requiring switching.
    Would be nice if they expanded this to work with SWiM.
     
  13. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

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    If I were really, really desperate, as I sometimes can be when working in a commercial environment, I think I could get it to work for Ku plus Ka upper using four of them, locking one on each polarity. I wouldn't have to pass SWM upstream that way, and the 22 KHz tones can be furnished using drop in tone generators, like a Spaun SG 22 S, which look like a drop in amps and only draws about 17mA.

    While I see no reason for the GlassLink units to have a 1,450 lowpass filter, I would wager heavily that they do incorporate a 950 MHz highpass filter, to block out broadcast TV signals.

    The last time I almost used these was during the NATO 50th Anniversary celebration. Either Secret Service or the FBI contracted with me to set up reception for the temporary facility they had to coordinate their security for that event. I guess they paid a two year subscription for two weeks of use. I thought that what I was doing was important since, if something happened, they would need to be aware of what the public knew, when, and how they were reacting, but I was assured that had nothing to do with it. I was told that nothing ever happens when they set up these temporary outposts and all they wanted it for was entertainment, so they wouldn't get bored. All they watched was HBO.

    I told the supervisor that it would take me a couple of days to get a GlassLink, so he told me to just drill through the wall. When I said that tenants aren't ordinarily permitted to do that, he replied, "What are they going to do to us?" and so I drilled away.

    I set up another one that never got used at all. One year, there were too many presidential primary candidates and they said that if the field didn't get pared down to a certain size by a certain date, then they were going to need an auxilliary office to meet their responsiblities, but a few candidates did withdraw, and so I never wound up even activating those receivers.
     
  14. Jodean

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    flat cables usually work in a window quite well, vinyl or other.

    Keep that window shut though.

    I usually find a designated window, have them leave that shut, tie into the cable jack in that room, find the splitter in the unit and go from there, even if this window isnt right next to the dish, works pretty good. You dont have to go in the closest door or window to the dish.
     
  15. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    So you are still using the dc voltage created through an inductive coupling in this case, right? It would seem to me if there were any source of power outside (not at all uncommon on patio or deck), then a through glass coupler would be easy to design that would pass the necessary rf.
     
  16. AntAltMike

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    Yeah, if you had patio power, then you could use a Sonora polarity locker outside and be left just dealing with passing the RF through the glass.
     
  17. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Nice. Odd, though, that they mention only that it works with Dish signals. You'd think Marketing would want to add DIRECTV®.
     
  18. Lord Vader

    Lord Vader Supreme Member

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    Well, I didn't get these exact ones; rather, the ones provided by the DirecTV installer were exactly the same type of flat cables in terms of color, length, etc. BTW, it doesn't say these are for DISH only; it says that these "also work for DISH signals."
     
  19. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Here's the main blrub:

    Eagle Aspen FC-300LX Slimline Flexible 8 Inch Flat RG6 Coax Window Cable (FC-300LX)

    Model: FC-300LX-8
    Availability: In Stock
    Requires no drilling.Use through windows sills and door wall frames for fast and easy installations. More >
    ● Passes 3-3000 MHz
    ● Perfect for Homes, Apartments, Cabins and Motor Homes
    ● Manufacturers may vary depending on availability
    ● Also works with DISH Network satellite signals
    ● Sweep tested at up to 3 GHZ


    Reading elsewhere makes it clear it works for DIRECTV®.
    My point was it wasn't good marketing copy or layout.
     
  20. Lord Vader

    Lord Vader Supreme Member

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    Huh? The product description is clear. It's for DirecTV satellite reception but also works for DISH Network. One doesn't have to "read elsewhere."
     

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