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Florida Ballot Initiatives...

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Richard King, Aug 3, 2004.

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  1. Aug 3, 2004 #1 of 29
    Richard King

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    Florida allows the citizen to petition to have items placed on the ballot to be added to the state constitution. The process requires the collection of soe 400,000 signatures for an item to be added to the ballot. The Florida constitution is probably the easiest in the country to ammend because of this process. In the past, through the wisdom of this process, the people of Florida decided that pregnant pigs should require a minimum sized pen to be kept in and this is now in the constitution. We also decided that classes in public schools should be limited to a specific size, while at the same time electing a Governor who was against the ammendment and rejecting the candidate who was in favor of it.

    Eight proposals make Florida ballot
    http://www.tcpalm.com/tcp/politics/article/0,1651,TCP_1023_3082876,00.html
    This year's initiatives:
    This was added after the Supreme Court of Florida decided that a 1999 law requiring doctors to notify parents was unconstitutional.
    Shortens the period for collecting signatures.

    This repeals an ammendment voted in a couple of years ago. Oh, the sillyness.
     
  2. Aug 3, 2004 #2 of 29
    HappyGoLucky

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    Yes, altering a Constitution, be it state or federal, for political points and whimsy is both insulting and dispicable.
     
  3. Aug 3, 2004 #3 of 29
    RichW

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    While I lived in Florida for a while, I never paid to much attention to its constitution. I found local politics to be quite unsophisticated compared to the midwest where I grew up. Sounds like they treat the state constitution there like a book of statutes rather than a broad set of governing principles.
     
  4. Aug 3, 2004 #4 of 29
    MikeSoltis

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    Number 7 is actually a pretty good idea, given that a patient recently died at a Sarasota hospital, and the hospital is hiding behind 'privacy' laws to not give any details, and I mean ANY details, such as...male/female? age? when? circumstances (how?)
    The only thing we know is the patient died after being given the wrong blood type.

    Would this be kinda like CarFax for health care?
     
  5. Aug 3, 2004 #5 of 29
    RichW

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    A side issue, but for those who rail about malpractice suits, you should realize that if malpracrice were classified as a disease it woul be the sixth largest killer in the USA. The results and bad consequences of malpractice continue to grow.
     
  6. Aug 3, 2004 #6 of 29
    Richard King

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    On that subject, I will probably go FOR Item #3 and #7, but against #8 since, if #7 passes #8 shouldn't be needed.
     
  7. Aug 3, 2004 #7 of 29
    RichW

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    The medical profession should be taking care of #8 anyway. If your state licensing board is so lenient to allow a number of such docs to remain in practice, then there is where the problem lies.
     
  8. Aug 3, 2004 #8 of 29
    Richard King

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    While I agree, sort of, but, I am not sufficiently educated on how many malpractice suits are filed against the typical doctor. A doctor in one field (pediatrician?) may be much more susceptible to malpractice than a doctor in another field (general practitioner? if there is such a thing anymore), so, having a right to practice revoked after hitting a fixed number is probably not appropriate.
     
  9. Aug 4, 2004 #9 of 29
    SimpleSimon

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    I have a cousin who is one of the top PIP-type lawyers in Fla. There's a LOT of malpractice going on - and I for one don't care about the specialty - 3 strikes and you're out sure sounds good to me.

    P.S. I'm a 2-time victim of medical malpractice.
     
  10. toenail

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    My recollection is that the U.S. Supreme Court has found unconstitutional statutes that require parental notification of an intended abortion, unless the statute provides for a "judicial bypass." That "bypass" allows the minor to get the abortion approved by a judge without having to let either parent know about it. If the folks in Florida believe this proposed Amendment will really accomplish anything, they are in for a suprise.
     
  11. RichW

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    Critics of a national health care system claim that US medicine is the best of the best and that such a system will destroy that status. But in reality the incidents of malpractice and medical mistakes in this country are higher than those industrialized nations with "socialized medicine". I just read an article from the NIH where the number of medical mistakes may have been understated by some 50 percent. My own father died due to a misdiagnosis (in Florida) but Mom never sued in return for the doctor dropping the $60,000 medical bill his (mis)treatment had run up.
     
  12. HappyGoLucky

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    Yes, when you get past the window-dressing claims made by the rah-rah team against universal health care, you begin to see that the health care system in the USA is NOT one of the best in the world. In some measures we're on par with third-world countries. Sure, if you can afford great care, it is available here. But that's where it gets tricky. In no other western country do you have so very many people, adults and children, who have no access to quality care.
     
  13. toenail

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    That's why our streets are strewn with the dying and the dead. Yeah. Right.
     
  14. SimpleSimon

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    While there ARE serious problems with our system as it stands - socialized medicine is MUCH worse. If I need an MRI on my knee to determine the need for surgery, I can get it TODAY - and the surgery first thing in the morning. Try that in Canada - you'll be in the 8-month wait right next to your wife waiting for her mammogram.
     
  15. Bogy

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    But if you don't have insurance or the money to pay for it out of your own pocket, or if your insurance company will not certify the MRI on your knee, you won't be getting that MRI, ever. And your wife will probably not be getting that mammogram either.


    BTW, just when did you live in a country with socialized medicine?
     
  16. SimpleSimon

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    Besides the many other things I've done in my life, I'm also a medic. I also know how to read, and I converse with people from all over the world on a regular basis. Most recently, just spent another week in Vancouver.

    And you're right - not having health insurance sucks - big time! However, I don't see any guaranteed right to health care written down anywhere.

    The example I give is from the National Post, September, 2003. It refers to issues in Nova Scotia. Sorry, I don't remember any more about it than that.
     
  17. SAEMike

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    You want to see how good socialized medicine is, go to an Air Force or Army base, try to make an appointment for 4 weeks later, and then show up and wait for the six or seven hours they are behind.
     
  18. Bogy

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    But that is a big qualifier. We have a pretty good health care system, as long as your insurance will cover it. I've always had pretty good health care insurance, but I'm noticing more and more items that they either will not cover, or will only cover after certification. As far as all those uninsured people in this country, you're paying for them in many ways. Lost productivity, increased insurance costs, higher taxes, the cost is there, we just aren't spending the money effectively as we might.
     
  19. Bogy

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    But I thought Bush was taking exellent care of our military?

    My daughter's employer recently changed insurance coverage, which means she now must change doctors. She has been waiting for weeks to get in. So what's your point?
     
  20. SAEMike

    SAEMike Banned User

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    PRESIDENT Bush is taking excellent care of our military, who just recieved a pay raise today. He cannot, however, fix a system that is inherantly flawed, and that has been bad for years, overnight. Nor is he in charge of the day to day operations of the many military hospitals around the country. (shocking, I know)
     
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