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Food police confiscate 4-year old’s lunch, bill parents

Discussion in 'The OT' started by cj9788, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    Teays...
    I agree with you right up to the point where I am paying for it. Then the person paying for it has a say.
     
  2. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    They are still not. My daughter takes her lunch 4 days a week. She gets to choose the day she eats the school lunch. Why? Because the school lunches have 800-1100 calories. That is way to much for lunch.

    Not in my district, but in the district was part of Jamie Oliver's food revolution where he came in an "fixed" school lunches. Problem was the kids didn't want to eat them because they were nasty. Kids don't want to eat vegetarian BBQ. There has be a happy medium.
     
  3. BubblePuppy

    BubblePuppy Good night dear Smoke... love you & "got your butt

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    Except when it comes to something like the increase audio volume of commercials.. then it's when will the government do something about this. It really depends on what part of one's life, doesn't it? ;-)
     
  4. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    The...
    Not to take the conversation off-topic, but while we debate the merits of school
    lunches, millions of children around the world go without lunch altogether.

    Why is that?
     
  5. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

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    "Eat your vegetables! Children are starving in Europe!"
     
  6. cj9788

    cj9788 Hall Of Fame

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    Wow so it is okay to presume that all people on food stamps are low life scum without the common sense to to buy what they see fit for their families. I think people are upset that they are even food stamps, or free or subsidized lunches in school.

    Not every person on welfare is a drug addict, Florida recently began drug testing food stamp applicants with the presumption that all persons appling are on drugs and they need to prove they are not before they get the benefits. Great Idea right, imagine all the tax dollars that are going to be saved when they fail the test. BUZZZ WRONG. Over 95% of those tested passed. Florida had to reimburse hundreds of thousands of dollars to the applicants because they passed, and they are now on the food stamp rolls. The law is now on the back burner as the ACLU has brought a lawsuit against the state because it violates peoples fourth amendment rights.

    So some people think that's they have a say because it is taxpayer money being spent. That is ludicrous. Do we have a say when the Army spends 8000 dollars for a toilet seat? Do we have a say when the government spends any of our money? You may think we do but 99% of the time our say falls on deaf ears and the government spends the money any way they want.

    I for one see the big picture here, the government is slowly encroaching in our freedoms and they are using "safety" to do it. Yesteryear it was Seatbelt and speed limit laws, we sat back and we took it. Now it is the food we eat or buy and state government is using our schools to target us. Next it will be limiting what is bought with food stamps then an all out ban on food that is bad for you. When will it stop.
     
  7. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Those $8,000.00 toilet seats finance clandestine operations. ;)
     
  8. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

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    USDA: Preschooler’s meal was not ‘replaced,’ mom was never charged fee

    6:12 pm, February 15, 2012by Ryan Sullivan
    Christy Eldridge, the head of Brookhaven Day School in Greensboro, inspects a child's lunchbox. (WGHP Photo)

    GREENSBORO, N.C. — National attention has been drawn to a reported incident in which a North Carolina preschooler was given a cafeteria lunch because a state worker deemed her homemade lunch unhealthy.

    The Carolina Journal first reported the incident on Tuesday in an article titled “Preschooler’s Homemade Lunch Replaced with Cafeteria ‘Nuggets’.” The reported incident revolves around state regulation that requires all lunches in pre-Kindergarten programs to meet U.S. Department of Agriculture guidelines. It doesn’t matter if the lunches are packed from home or purchased in the cafeteria.

    The Journal initially reported that a state agent was inspecting lunchboxes in a West Hoke Elementary School ‘More at Four’ classroom. The report has since been edited and no longer reads that it was a state agent but a “person who was inspecting lunches.”

    The Journal reported the inspector decided that a girl’s lunch — which consisted of a turkey and cheese sandwich, a banana, apple juice and potato chips — “did not meet USDA guidelines.”

    The Journal reports the child was then provided with a full cafeteria tray, from which she ate three chicken nuggets. The Journal reported they spoke with the girl’s mother after her daughter returned home with her home-packed meal untouched. The mother has not been publicly identified.

    The mother told the Journal she received a note from the school explaining that children who “did not bring a ‘healthy lunch’ would be offered the missing portions, which could result in a fee from the cafeteria, in her case $1.25,” the Journal reports.

    Bruce Alexander, director of communications and governmental affairs with the USDA, said Wednesday the person inspecting lunches was a “North Carolina Education staff member conducting a review of the child care center.”

    The review, which took place on Jan. 30, was part of the state’s ‘Star Rated’ licensing program, Alexander said. The program is designed to provide parents with a rating of child care centers across the state, including the nutritional content of the meals consumed by children.

    “A teacher apparently was nervous during this state review and mishandled the situation,” Alexander said.

    Alexander also said the mother was never charged for the meal.

    “The school thought it had been resolved, apologized to the parent and never charged the parent for a school meal,” he said.

    WHAT CONSTITUTES A USDA-APPROVED LUNCH FOR PRESCHOOLERS?

    The state guidelines require that one serving of meat, one serving of grains, one serving of dairy, and two servings of fruits or vegetables are provided with each meal.

    “Which means the state can come in at any time to check and see if we are in compliance with the state guidelines — for cleanliness, sanitation reasons, what the children are doing or playing socially, what they eat,” said Christy Eldridge, head of Brookhaven Day School — a state-licensed pre-K school in Greensboro.

    If a teacher feels that a child’s home-packed meal does not meet the state’s requirements, the teacher is required to supplement the meal with whatever is missing to ensure the child is provided with a healthy lunch.

    Nothing from a home-packed meal is ever taken away and teachers cannot force a child to eat whatever supplemental servings are provided.
    (emphasis added by me)Eldridge said parents of her schoolchildren know and understand the state regulation. However, she said they are often adding something to a child’s plate.

    Eldridge feels the state is simply looking out for the health of schoolchildren and said she doesn’t mind having to add a fruit or vegetable to a child’s lunch if the state requires it. Some pre-K programs prefer to avoid the situation altogether by not allowing their students to bring a packed lunch, she said.

    At Brookhaven, where the 4 to 5-year-old classrooms are made up of between 12 and 18 students, children who ate in the cafeteria on Wednesday were served a lunch that consisted of fish sticks, corn, peaches, potatoes, and a small carton of milk.



    http://myfox8.com/2012/02/15/usda-meal-was-not-replaced-mom-was-never-charged
     
  9. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    Maybe not in south Florida, but here in Appalachia it is a different story. We have 3rd and 4th generation welfare recipients and most have no desire to get off the public tit. And most of them are uneducated and as a result raise uneducated kids. It is a cycle that is very hard to break.


    I do agree with you here. But the difference is the general encroachment of freedoms for everyone vs. the encroachment of freedoms to someone who is getting free money.
     
  10. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    We were given the "Children in Ethiopia" line in Elementary school. It didn't go over to well when we said we'd gladly donate our lunches.
     
  11. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    In my hometown, they started a summer lunch program as well as a breakfast during the school year because too many weren't getting enough meals at home.
     
  12. TXD16

    TXD16 Icon

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    It was the "starving children in China" when I was a kid. For poor kids, they sure do get around. ;)
     
  13. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    The point is that since people are receiving government assistance, the government has a right to require certain conditions be met. As a taxpayer, I am not saying that someone can and cannot purchase certain items with their food stamps. However, I see it understandable and not a imposition for the government to look at this way:

    We are giving you free money to purchase food for your family since you cannot afford it. However, since we are providing this to you for free, we will restrict you from purchasing certain things so that there is at least a chance that you will be providing somewhat healthy meals for you family.

    The idea of the assistance is to allow people that cannot afford to feed and support their families to do so. If you give someone free money and they decide to use it to just by cigarettes or alcohol, that family is not being helped.

    Remember, nothing is truely free. There is always a string attached. In this case, if you accept the food stamps, you are restricted as to what you can use them for.

    So, having people wear seatbelts and setting speed limits was the government encroaching on our freedoms? By the way, one of the main purposes of a goverment is to protect its citizens. While some people may argue over the maximum speed limits on highways, I think you will be hard pressed to find anyone that would object to the fact that all speed limits are bad.

    - Merg
     
  14. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    Whole story smacks of a school trying to up their school lunch budget and grants.



    "If you don't eat yer meat, you can't have any pudding.
    How can you have any pudding if you don't eat yer meat?"
     
  15. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    USDA "APPROVED" LUNCH vs MOM's LUNCH?

    1 serving of meat -- turkey
    1 serving of grains -- bread
    1 serving of dairy -- cheese
    2 servings of fruits/veggies -- a banana, apple juice, potato chips

    You decide. :scratch:

    The Journal reported the [strike]inspector[/strike] school employee decided that a girl’s lunch...“did not meet USDA guidelines.” The child was then provided with a full cafeteria tray, from which she ate three chicken nuggets.
     
  16. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    Follow up makes it sond like a teacher changed it because they didn't think it met the guidelines and didn't want to fail an inspection. If that's the case, that teacher needs to go back and take a health class. :lol:
     
  17. sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Yeah, that's what it probably was. From the article, "“A teacher apparently was nervous during this state review and mishandled the situation,” Alexander said." http://myfox8.com/2012/02/15/usda-meal-was-not-replaced-mom-was-never-charged/
    The Journal lied, it wasn't a state inspector, it was an overzealous and incorrect teacher. The inspector was there to check things, however it's the educator who took early and improper action.
     
  18. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

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    I have read a little more about this than the rest of you may have because I first saw it in another forum. It was speculated that an insecure teacher who was concerned that she or he school might get reamed by the inspectors for permitting substandard meals had concluded - possibly correctly, perhaps incorrectly - that the "2 servings of fruits/veggies" requirement might not have been met and provided the extra nutrition that would assue that it had been met. One source of confusion may have been that the teacher didn't realize that a meal could have two fruit portions and no vegetables, rather than one and one, and another may have been they she thought, correctly or incorrectly, that the potato chips might not satisfy a portion requirement, either qualitatively or quantitatively.

    The student's grandmother explained that they don't pack vegetables in her lunch because they are concerned that she wouldn't eat them, which seems a reasonable concern in light of the fact that she didn't eat them when they were placed in front of her on the cafeteria tray, but that they basically force feed them (my term, not theirs) to her at dinner.
     
  19. photostudent

    photostudent Godfather

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    Well I for one congratulate the school for trying to do what was best for the child, (in loco parentis). As noted above most of the original details were overblown. They had someone from the school on TV. They had just sent the little girl to get herself a carton of milk and there was a misunderstanding. You have to live in this part of the country to understand what a plague childhood obesity is. I know there are complex cultural reasons for this but I am old enough to remember when it was not the case. You would have to have your head up the rear of the fast food industry to think the change is a good thing. If you want to fault someone it would be the Media for jerking everyone's chain without getting all the facts.
     
  20. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    If only that were true. The last article I read (From FOX 8) led me to believe the school was in the process of being evaluated by the state and had an evaluator there that day. A teacher wanting to make sure the school passed decided to go around checking lunches to impress the evaluator. It was this teacher who acted in the best interest of the school. Not the child.
     

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