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Francis: How will the hurricane affect Dish Network?

Discussion in 'General DISH™ Discussion' started by alebowgm, Sep 4, 2004.

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  1. Sep 4, 2004 #1 of 24
    alebowgm

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    Hey,

    I am wondering what channels may be transmitting out of Flordia and may experience some down time in the next day or so. Even though I don't live in the sunshine state, I am wondering about national/conus possibilities.

    Although you can figure that anyone in Flordia currently isn't getting any useable signal and that anyone in the Spotbeam probably isn't getting any transmission from any of the local stations...

    I was away during the last hurricane so this may have come up a few weeks ago, but I would figure that Sky Angel may have some trouble as they are out of S. Flordia.

    Any other channels?

    BTW, OT: FTA, anyone know where some raw feeds are for the hurriance?
     
  2. Sep 4, 2004 #2 of 24
    scooper

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    Actually - My experiance with hurricanes is that it is possible to receive, but signal drops get rather annoying. Kind of like having a big thunderstorm around. If the drops get too bad, I switch back to OTA antenna. The best thing about DBS / storms is that as soon as the storm is gone - your reception is back again (possibile dish re-points)- unlike some cable companies :) .
     
  3. Sep 4, 2004 #3 of 24
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    With Charley the Tampa stations left the air and E* got permission from those to substitute other network stations during the outage. (One Tampa station stayed on via a fibre link.) If E*'s POPs lose signal everyone loses signal.

    Losing channels really depends on the backhaul. Most markets have a set of local TV tuners at a "POP" (point of presence) that can pick up that market's signals OTA. Some stations provide a direct feed to the POP that isn't OTA. From the POP to E*'s uplink they usually use fibre, not a direct uplink. But those circuits do go down during severe storms.

    SkyAngel does have a lot of Florida sourced programming, but the uplink to E3 is not in Florida. Again, it depends on the backhaul. If E*'s uplink gets the signal via satellite from Florida SkyAngel could see outages. The channels that are not created in Florida should have no outages at all.

    Frances is a weak storm but very wet and sustained. Most places will just see it as a long duration rainstorm, not the riproaring destruction of Charley. Not that Frances can't be a bigger pain than Charley, but it will hurt in different ways. Most likely in ways that will not touch satellite broadcast. Those send antennas are pretty good.

    JL
     
  4. Sep 4, 2004 #4 of 24
    stonecold

    stonecold Banned User

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    I live in Florida and charley hit right below me. I happen to live in sarasota which is just north of port charlotte and punta gorda. Never lost tv signal my tampa locals had issues but other than that . But again I really have never had an issue with rain fade. As anything I think it comes down to the quality of the install. they way the cabling was handled and where there are runned.
     
  5. Sep 4, 2004 #5 of 24
    SimpleSimon

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    Much more important than the cabling is how much effort went into peaking the dish. :) There's way too many installers out there that will get 80 and call it good when another few minutes of work will yield 100.
     
  6. Sep 4, 2004 #6 of 24
    stonecold

    stonecold Banned User

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    Well i kinda lumped peaking the dish with the quality of the install...

    I had a great installer all transponders are in the 120-125 range. Wehen I was talking about cabling. I seen some installs where they use pos cabling as in the cheapest bargin bin stuff they could buy. My installer was nice put out nice RG-6QS

    also made sure things liked the switch and connectors where out of direct rain.
     
  7. Sep 5, 2004 #7 of 24
    TomCat

    TomCat Broadcast Engineer

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    Quad shield cable will make no dif, except to make you feel better. The chief advantage is improved shielding. Since there is no terrestrial in that frequency band (at least that might be strong enough to interfere) any ingress/egress issues are moot. Good RG6 will be just as good. On short runs, the cheapest RG59 out there will work just as good and probably last just as long if the installer took care to keep it out of sunlight and other elements.

    The connectors, and the installer's skill at installing them, is more of an issue. Bad connector technique on the best cable is always trumped by good connector technique on cheap cable. Unfortunately, the problems that come from bad connector technique might take months or years to present themselves, which is why replacing connectors is the first thing most good techs do when troubleshooting a signal problem that can't be tweaked out.
     
  8. Sep 5, 2004 #8 of 24
    JohnH

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    Yeah, the satellite receiver loves to see the local UHF TV signal running around inside it, not.

    Throw away the signal with lossy RG 59! WOW!!
     
  9. Sep 5, 2004 #9 of 24
    SimpleSimon

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    Hey John! I thought the low-band of satellite feed was 950-1450MHz and UHF ended around 850MHz?

    As for RG-59 - the only thing it's good for is receiver to TV runs. Especially if your setup is DishPro - then even older RG-6 (not rated to 2150MHz) is no good.
     
  10. Cyclone

    Cyclone Hall Of Fame/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    When hurricane Isabella hit us last year, I was able to watch Dish during the entire "event". Cable was out for two days (and longer for some others). I guess that the Hurricane clouds don't reach the same height as some of the summer thunderstorms that we can get around here.
     
  11. Marcus S

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    Local cable companies will see this as an opportunity and quickly advertise that DBS owners are reckless and endangered their family and neighbors. "You and your neighbors would have been able to watch important network broadcast events if you had cable." Coming soon to Time Warner, Comcast, & Charter; "our new programming package includes a diesel powered generator to power your TV and cable set top box."

    Disclaimer; Not available in all areas. Failure of our batteries in our distribution network and/or downed distribution poles/points may result in a recording when you call us. "We have the finest technicians working on the outage in your area and we appreciate your business, but enjoy the power generator and it will at least keep the porch light on for you tonight". -click

    Funny, my cousin lives in Brandon. Their power & DBS are back and their cable neighbors have been told it could take days before cable TV is restored. Humm... I thought that was just the typical cable service call response. Who is popular tonight?

    Channel 8 showed a disheveled individual with the roof ripped from his home. Pointed his dismounted dish at the heavens using cinder blocks, got a lock, and sat in a patio chair under a make shift canape and watched on his 20" (former) kitchen TV.
     
  12. JohnH

    JohnH Hall Of Fame

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    Yep, it is that way, but when both are in there who knows what intermodulation products you might get or how much the front-end might get overloaded. :)
     
  13. SimpleSimon

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    I would say ZERO. :D

    We diplex VHF & UHF signals directly onto the satellite feed cable all the time. The leakage beyond the diplexer is probably a lot more than would penetrate any coax shield. ;)
     
  14. JohnH

    JohnH Hall Of Fame

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    Yep, you designed a perfect amplifier, not.

    Might as well wrap the cable around the microwave oven a couple of times. just to make sure the signal is less than optimal. :D
     
  15. Big Bob

    Big Bob Godfather

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    FWIW

    My brand new SW64, straight from E*, supplied a short length of RG59 as a patch from the power inserter to the receiver.
     
  16. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    The...
    Be sure to remove the cat first! :eek:

    :lol:
     
  17. SimpleSimon

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    I think you miss my point. Of COURSE, there's some crap signal getting in. I'm just saying it doesn't matter with a properly operating satellite receiver.
     
  18. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    The cleaner you can get the signal the better. Leaky cable picking up UHF and losing E*'s downconvert is different than a properly working antenna properly diplexed to the feed.

    Garbage in, Garbage out. Clean signal in, a better chance of clean signal out.

    JL
     
  19. Mickdog

    Mickdog Godfather

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    And throw some Terminators in to boot!!!! :eek2:
     
  20. SimpleSimon

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    Yes, of course, but IIRC the discussion was about the difference between standard RG-6 vs. quad shield as relates to OTA UHF signals finding their way into the signal path. It just ain't that big a deal.

    My point was that the UHF passing the diplexer would be greater than the OTA UHF getting through a standard properly installed RG-6.
     
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